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Lilly to move 1,000 from Faris campus

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Eli Lilly and Co. will move all the employees at its Faris campus on South Meridian Street in Indianapolis to its Lilly Corporate Center complex on South Delaware Street, the company announced today.

Lilly’s ongoing staff cuts are rendering some of its downtown office space unneeded, and the company wants to locate its employees on the same campus as part of a new business structure.

IBJ reported on Lilly’s relocation discussions in August, after the company hired CB Richard Ellis to lease the 465,000 square feet on the Faris campus. The office complex opened in 2002, costing $58 million.

The site is listed as still available on CB Richard Ellis’ Web site. Lilly said it would not be finished moving its employees until mid-2010.

First, Lilly will renovate a building on its corporate campus to house the Faris employees. The renovation will do away with cubicles and include more open work settings and common areas. Lilly hopes the new office environment will help its employees collaborate better as they work to launch and market new drugs.

In September, Lilly formalized that strategy under the name Development Center of Excellence. It also said it would cut 5,500 jobs worldwide in the next two years.

“Collocating a critical mass of our Indianapolis-based Development Center of Excellence employees, discovery & clinical research teams, and business unit employees will better enable us to deliver improved outcomes to individual patients as soon as possible,” said Lilly CEO John Lechleiter in a statement.

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  1. It is nice and all that the developer grew up here and lives here, but do you think a company that builds and rehabs cottage-style homes has the chops to develop $150 Million of office, retail, and residential? I'm guessing they will quickly be over their skis and begging the city for even more help... This project should occur organically and be developed by those that can handle the size and scope of something like this as several other posters have mentioned.

  2. It amazes me how people with apparently zero knowledge of free markets or capitalism feel the need to read and post on a business journal website. Perhaps the Daily Worker would suit your interests better. It's definitely more sympathetic to your pro government theft views. It's too bad the Star is so awful as I'm sure you would find a much better home there.

  3. In other cities, expensive new construction projects are announced by real estate developers. In Carmel, they are announced by the local mayor. I am so, so glad I don't live in Carmel's taxbase--did you see that Carmel, a small Midwest suburb, has $500 million in debt?? That's unreal! The mayor thinks he's playing with Lego sets and Monopoly money here! Let these projects develop organically without government/taxpayer backing! Also, from a design standpoint, the whole town of Carmel looks comical. Grand, French-style buildings and promenades, sitting next to tire yards. Who do you guys think you are? Just my POV as a recent transplant to Indy.

  4. GeorgeP, you mention "necessities". Where in the announcement did it say anything about basic essentials like groceries? None of the plans and "vision" have basic essentials listed and nothing has been built. Traffic WILL be a nightmare. There is no east/west road capacity. GeorgeP, you also post on www.carmelchatter.com and your posts have repeatedly been proven wrong. You seem to have a fair amount of inside knowledge. Do you work on the third floor of Carmel City Hal?

  5. I don't know about the commuter buses...but it's a huge joke to see these IndyGo buses with just one or two passengers. Absolutely a disgusting waste of TAXPAYER money. Get some cojones and stop funding them. These (all of them) council members work for you. FIRE THEM!

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