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New IU program lets students invest $100,000

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Students in a financial management class at Indiana University will get a chance to invest real money as they handle a $100,000 account.

Kelley School of Business Dean Dan Smith said a $100,000 donation from two IU alumni will provide a hands-on learning opportunity for students. IU students in their junior year can apply to be analysts for the fund, and those chosen will manage and invest the money.

IU says a review board made up of faculty, professionals and alumni will question students about their choices, but the investment decisions will largely be left in the hands of students.

The Knall-Cohen Investment Fund is being established through a donation from IU alumni David Knall and Jeff Cohen, managing directors of Stifel Nicolaus' Indianapolis office.

Knall is one of the nation’s top-producing investment brokers. The Carmel-based advisory team he and Cohen lead oversees billions of dollars on behalf of many of the state’s wealthiest businesspeople.





 

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