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Two local attorneys facing criminal charges

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Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry has filed charges against two Indianapolis lawyers following grand jury investigations, his office announced Friday afternoon.

David F. Rees, who has already given up his law license, is accused of stealing from a client's estate, in which $400,000 went unaccounted, according to Curry's office.

Rees drafted the will and served as executor for the estate of the late Benjamin Roberts. Eight years after Roberts' death, $400,000 turned up missing, and Rees acknowledged diverting $270,549 to his own bank account. He faces a Class C felony charge of theft.

Rees also has been charged with obstruction of justice related to a final accounting of the estate, which he filed in January 2012, indicating all the money was still there. He has agreed to enter a guilty plea to both charges with a sentence to be concurrent on the two counts. He faces a maximum penalty of eight years in in prison, $20,000 in fines and restitution of $270,549.

The Indiana Supreme Court accepted Rees' resignation from the bar in a Jan. 28 order. As a result, ongoing disciplinary proceedings were dismissed. Rees will be ineligible to practice law for five years, according to the order.

Curry also charged Steven B. Geller with five counts of tax evasion, a Class D felony. He failed to file state tax income tax returns for the years 2007 through 2011, a probable cause affidavit alleges. Geller was arrested March 7, Curry's office said.

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  1. Once a Marion Co. commuter tax is established, I'm moving my organization out of Indianapolis. Face it, with the advancement in technology, it's getting more cost effective to have people work out of their homes. The clock is running out on the need for much of the office space in Indianapolis. Establishing a commuter tax will only advance the hands of the clock and the residents of Indianapolis will be left to clean up the mess they created on their own, with much less resources.

  2. The 2013 YE financial indicates the City of Indianapolis has over $2 B in assets and net position of $362.7 M. All of these assets have been created and funded by taxpayers. In 2013 they took in $806 M in revenues. Again, all from tax payers. Think about this, Indianapolis takes in $800 M per year and they do not have enough money? The premise that government needs more money for services is false.

  3. As I understand it, the idea is to offer police to live in high risk areas in exchange for a housing benefit/subsidy of some kind. This fact means there is a choice for the officer(s) to take the offer and receive the benefit. In terms of mandating living in a community, it is entirely reasonable for employers to mandate public safety officials live in their community. Again, the public safety official has a choice, to live in the area or to take another job.

  4. The free market will seek its own level. If Employers cannot hire a retain good employees in Marion Co they will leave and set up shop in adjacent county. Marion Co already suffers from businesses leaving I would think this would encourage more of the same.

  5. We gotta stop this Senior crime. Perhaps long jail terms for these old boozers is in order. There are times these days (more rather than less) when this state makes me sick.

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