IBJNews

New rules taking effect despite Pence moratorium

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Dozens of new rules and regulations have been implemented in Indiana in recent months despite an executive order Gov. Mike Pence signed on his first day in office creating a moratorium on them to allow his administration time to weed out unnecessary policies.

That's because Pence's order allowed any rules agencies had already started to continue through the approval process and granted exceptions for matters of safety, health or emergency or to meet federal requirements.

State Budget Director Chris Atkins tells The Journal Gazette that although the Office of Management and Budget has approved about 30 new rules and regulations, many agencies haven't tried to implement new rules this year. The notices of intent to file a new rule dropped 72 percent in the first five months of 2013 compared with the same period in 2012.

Some of the rules that have been approved this year include one allowing a dog park in Fort Harrison in Indianapolis and another allowing alcohol sales within the Indiana Dunes State Park pavilion.

Requests that have been rejected include a plan to increase tolls on the Wabash Memorial Toll Bridge in southern Indiana and a Department of Natural Resources rule that would have added provisions regarding notice to adjacent landowners for game bird shooting preserves.

Atkins says work has begun to review the state's 11,000 pages of administrative rules to identify those that are unnecessary or are burdensome. The state plans to set up a website to collect opinions and will examine the permitting processes residents must follow. Public input will help guide the review process.

Sen. Mike Young, R-Indianapolis, former chairman of the Administrative Rules Oversight Committee, said rules are necessary but that he thinks the review is a good idea. He said some rules licensing various professions can become onerous and limit competition.

"Once these rules go in, unless it's really outrageous it's really difficult to get them out," he noted.

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Strange but true
    Sometimes businesses want rules from government, particularly when a statute produced by our awesome legislature is vague or leaves important questions unanswered. It helps resolve uncertainty and done properly can seriously limit the discretionary/arbitrary power of bureaucrats.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. I still don't understand how the FBI had any right whatsoever to investigate this elderly collector. Before the Antiquities Act it was completely legal to buy, trade or collect Native American artifacts. I used to see arrow heads, axes, bowls, corn grinders at antique shops and flea markets for sale and I bought them myself. But that was in the late 60's and early 70's. And I now know that people used to steal items from sites and sell them. I understand that is illegal. But we used to find arrow heads and even a corn grinder in our back yard when I was a child. And I still have those items today in my small collection.

  2. I lived in California and they had many of the things noted in the proposed suggestions from the "Blue Ribbon Panel". California is near financial collapse now. Let's not turn the great state of Indiana into a third world dump like California.

  3. The temporary closure of BR Avenue will get a lot of attention. But, one thing reported by the IndyStar really stands out to me, and is extraordinarily depressing: “Police also have agreed to crack down on noise violations, traffic violations and public intoxication.” In other words, the police have generously agreed to do their jobs (temporarily, at least), instead of just standing around waiting for someone to call 911. When is someone in this department going to get off their fat arse (looking at you, Chief), get their minds out of 1975-era policing and into 2014, and have his department engage in pro-active work instead of sitting around waiting for someone to be shot? Why in the hell does it take 7 people getting shot in one night in one of the city’s biggest tourist destinations, to convince the police (reluctantly, it would appear) that they actually need to do their f’n jobs? When is the Chief going to realize that there’s a huge, direct, proven correlation between enforcing the law (yes, all laws, especially those affecting quality of life) and preventing larger crimes from occurring? Is it racial BS? Is that what this extraordinary reluctance is all about? Is the department and the city terrified that if they do their jobs, they might offend someone? Whom, exactly? Will the victims of violence, murder, assault, rape, robbery, and theft be offended? Will the citizens who have to tolerate their deteriorating quality of life be offended? Will the businesses who see their customers flee be offended? Or, is it simple ignorance (maybe the Chief hasn’t heard about NYC’s success in fighting crime - it’s only the biggest g*&#am city in the country, after all)? Either way, Chief, if you don’t want to do your job, then step down. Let someone who actually wants the job take it.

  4. I thought Indiana had all the funding it needed for everything. That's why the state lottery and casino gambling were allowed, as the new tax revenue would take care of everything the state wanted to do.The recommendations sound like they came from California. Better think about that. What is the financial condition of that state?

  5. I was a fan of WIBC in the morning, Steve was the only WIBC host that I listened too, he gave the news with so much flare that I enjoyed listening to him on my way to work. Katz is no Steve. Sadly, I will not be listening to WIBC anymore.

ADVERTISEMENT