IBJNews

Union Station gets new scrutiny after spate of repairs

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

A portion of the brick wall on the south side of Union Station collapsed late last year during a wind storm. The city spent $290,000 on repairs.

Last month, a piece of the 127-year-old building’s ceiling fell, costing the city another $60,000 to fix.

The city is spending $600,000 to replace an escalator with an elevator to meet code requirements, and renovate the lobby.

rop-union-station-121613-15col.jpgPieces falling from Union Station have prompted city officials to mount the most comprehensive inspection of the building in several years. (IBJ photo/Eric Learned)

Seeing small projects pile up, city officials have launched an effort to assess the building’s condition with the most thorough inspection in several years.

The study, started by Browning Day Mullins Dierdorf Architects earlier this month, should take 30 to 60 days to complete at a cost to the city of $110,000. CSX, which operates the rail line running through Union Station, separately is gauging the condition of the tracks and is doing its own pricy inspection.

No one from the city is suggesting Union Station is due for a major overhaul. But some basic upkeep and tuck pointing likely is in order, said Adam Thies, director of the city’s Department of Metropolitan Development.

For all its historical significance, the building is getting more expensive for the city to maintain. The tab was $1.7 million in 2012.

“The building takes 24 trains a day and it’s 100 years old,” Thies said. “It’s going to have issues at times, and this is part of that.”

union-station-factbox.gifThe iconic structure that houses the Crowne Plaza Hotel, which is undergoing its own $8 million renovation, actually predates the 20th century. It opened in 1886.

Browning Day’s inspection will attempt to determine areas where repairs might be needed most, architect Greg Jacoby said.

“We felt that we ought to look at the whole structure and see if there’s a bigger problem or if it’s just isolated,” he said.

The inspection will be confined to the rail line portion of the station where tenants are located and will not include what’s known as The Grand Hall, the piece of Union Station that holds the most historical importance.

The building is in no danger of making Indiana Landmarks’ annual list of the state’s most endangered landmarks, mainly because of the city’s ownership and involvement in managing the property, said Mark Dollase, the not-for-profit’s vice president of preservation services.

Yet it still demands Indiana Landmarks’ full respect.

“Union Station is one of the most important historic landmarks in downtown Indianapolis,” he said.

It was designed by Pittsburgh architect Thomas Rodd in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, an offshoot of Romanesque Revival architecture named after Henry Hobson Richardson, who designed Trinity Church in Boston in the 1870s.

Completed in 1886, Union Station by the turn of that century serviced more than 200 trains a day, forcing the construction of an elevated platform to avoid interfering with street traffic. As travel by train began to wane following World War II, the train station fell into disrepair.

Adam Thies Thies

It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 and, four years later, was converted to a marketplace containing a collection of restaurants, nightclubs and specialty stores. That’s probably the last time the building has undergone a comprehensive rehab, Dollase said.

The last retail tenant, Hooters, left in 1997. A small collection of offices and not-for-profits occupies the space now, which boasts a healthy 98.7-percent occupancy rate. The Crowne Plaza that anchors the west end is still its largest tenant, occupying almost 154,000 square feet of the 275,000-square-foot station.

Former tenants include the Mexican consulate, a go-kart track and the 21st Century Charter School.

Reclaiming Union Station as a transportation hub, servicing more than a few Amtrak routes, would be ideal, Dollase said.

“With all the conversation going on in the city right now about transit and the need for mass transit, if properly designed and planned,” he said, “Union Station could again be a center for transit in Indianapolis.”

That’s probably not going to happen. City and local mass transit leaders reached consensus last year on a site for a $30 million downtown transit center funded mostly by a federal grant.

The preferred location is a half-block, city-owned surface parking lot along Washington Street between the City-County Building and Marion County Jail that would serve IndyGo buses and future transit offerings.

Whatever the future holds for Union Station, its importance to downtown is not lost on Browning Day’s Jacoby.

“Very few cities have a building of that quality of architecture,” he said. “It’s a gem that every now and then we need to invest some money in.”•

ADVERTISEMENT

  • CSX?
    If CSX spends anything it will be a first. They can't/won't maintain standard grade crossings and forget about the 100+ year old crumbling rail overpasses with exposed rebar and crumbling concrete!
  • Get it off the city's books
    I've said this for years: Union Station needs to be turned into a casino. That's the only way to save it. Even at a 98.7% occupancy rate, when repairs come in at $1.7M a year, no amount of rent will cover that. The city isn't in the landlord business, and should get out of it ASAP.
  • Contract
    The Grand Hall is part of the Crowne Plaza space. It is under contract and used for events, most of which are weddings. While it may be a romantic thought to have yesteryear travelers roaming the Grand Hall and walk up the stairs to the elevated tracks to take a light rail line, it's highly unlikely. It also would take the Grand Hall from a revenue producer to a liability for the city.
  • Recycling Infrastructure
    Why would we not use a grant to renovate and restore Union station to be used as a transportation hub? That building predates most of contemporary Indianapolis - it would be great to have it serve as the center of Indy's inevitable improved mass transit system.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. Now if he'd just stay there...

  2. Daniel - what about the many US citizens who do NOT follow what the Bible teaches? The Hindus, Jews, Muslims and others who are all American citizens entitled to all rights as Americans?? This issue has NOTHING to do with "What the Bible says..." Keep all Churches separate from State! Pence's ongoing idiocy continues to make Indiana look like a backwards, homophobic state in the eyes of our nation. Can't we move on to bigger issues - like educating our kids?

  3. 1. IBJ should link to the referenced report. We are in the age of electronic media...not sharing information is lazy. Here is a link http://www.in.gov/gov/files/Blue_Ribbon_Panel_Report_July_9_2014.pdf 2. The article should provide more clarity about the make-up of this panel. The commenters are making this item out to be partisan, it does not appear the panel is partisan. Here is a list of the panel which appears to be balanced with different SME to add different perspectives http://www.in.gov/activecalendar/EventList.aspx?view=EventDetails&eventidn=138116?formation_id=189603 3. It suggests a by-pass, I do not see where this report suggests another "loop". 4. Henry, based on your kneejerk reaction, we would be better off if you moved to another state unless your post was meant as sarcasm in which case I say Well Done. 5. The article and report actually indicates need to improve rail and port infrastructure in direct contradiction to Shayla commentary. Specifically, recommendation is to consider passenger rail projects... 6. People have a voice with their elected officials. These are suggestions and do not represent "crony capitalism", etc. The report needs to be analyzed and the legislature can decide on priorities and spending. Don't like it, then vote in a new legislature but quit artificially creating issues where there are none! People need to sift through the politics and provide constructive criticism to the process rather than making uninformed comments in a public forum based on misinformation. IBJ should work harder to correct the record in these forums when blatant errors or misrepresentations are made.

  4. Joe ... Marriage is defined in the Bible ... it is mentioned in the Bible often. Marriage is not mentioned once in the US or Indiana Constitution ...

  5. Daniel - Educate me please: what does the Bible have to do with laws? If the government wasn't in the business of marriage to begin with, then it wouldn't have to "define" marriage at all. Marriage could be left as a personal, religious, or otherwise unregulated action, with no ties to taxes, legal status, etc. Then people could marry whomever they want, and all this silliness would go away. Remember to vote Libertarian in November.

ADVERTISEMENT