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Sky Zone trampoline center bounces into Fishers

December 12, 2011
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Sky Zone, a franchised all-trampoline indoor recreational complex, is making the leap to the Indianapolis area.

A local center is set to open Monday in 25,000 square feet of space near Cumberland Road and East 121st Street just south of Interstate 69 in Fishers.

The facility features five all-trampoline areas—three so-called “foam zones” where jumpers can bounce from trampolines into foam pits to perform tricks, two dodge ball courts, and a 7,500-square-foot open jump section. Some of the areas feature basketball goals.

Two private-party rooms and a concession area complete the space.

“Here in the winter, there’s not a lot to do,” franchisee Jeff Mast said. “It’s a really unique combination of family fun and indoor recreation and fitness.”

Mast, a veteran Stanley Steemer executive who spent 19 years with the Dublin, Ohio-based company, moved from Columbus to Noblesville to open the Indianapolis area’s first Sky Zone.

He invested $1.2 million in the concept and is projecting first-year revenue of $1.5 million.

Sky Zone was launched in 2004 in St. Louis. The company has eight franchised locations: two each in Boston and Minneapolis, in addition to others in Columbus, Houston, Orlando and Ontario, Canada, according to the company’s website.

Franchises are set to open in Atlanta, Dallas, Memphis and Phoenix, too. Company-owned sites are in Las Vegas, Sacramento and Chesterfield, Mo.

Mast said he’s hired about 40 employees to staff the facility.

Sky Zone's hourly rate is typically $10 to $12 per person, which includes special shoes to wear on the trampolines.

Sky Zones typically host birthday parties, fraternity and sorority parties, corporate events and bar mitzvahs. But Mast said most of the revenue will be generated from general-admission customers.

“The thing that is not a big selling point is the health benefit, the fact that you get the kids away from the video games,” Mast said. “Even though it’s a great workout, they have an unbelievable time.”

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