KurtWiegand

Recent Articles

WEIGAND: Reinvesting in neighborhoods is essential

July 31, 2010
Our city is about to engage in a high-stakes gamble to avert a death spiral—or accelerate it and make it much more of a certainty.
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WEIGAND: Let's rethink fixes for urban poverty

March 27, 2010
The message to neighborhoods couldn’t be clearer: It’s absolutely essential to attract and retain middle-class homeowners with the resources to invest in—and maintain—their own homes, as well as support surrounding businesses.
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WIEGAND: Who's monitoring home construction?

January 30, 2010
About 18 months ago, I watched as the entire exterior of an expensive condo on the Central Canal—originally built in 1996—was rebuilt. Among the issues: There was no building paper (Tyvek) under the siding, treated lumber wasn’t used on the exposed porches, and neither was there any drainage.
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WIEGAND: School competition good for community

December 5, 2009
It’s vitally important to have innovative, competitive and successful school options available to attract and retain middle-class families in the neighborhoods.
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WIEGAND: Does Indianapolis suffer from 'economic apartheid'?

October 17, 2009
I see Mayor Greg Ballard’s plan to demolish abandoned homes as a sign of failure, an acknowledgment that our leaders—those whom we elected, business leaders, policy people, and leaders of not-for-profits—have failed us, much in the same way leaders dramatically failed the auto companies, investment banks and mortgage companies.
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  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

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