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Indiana's life sciences resources to be catalogued:

July 23, 2007
An idea fermenting for some time in the minds of several Indiana Health Industry Forum insiders has solidified into a plan to catalogue all life sciences-related resources across the state. The not-for-profit group, which promotes economic development in the health care and life sciences industries, will use the information to create strategies for communities, regions and the state to boost Indiana's growth in the industry. Companies including Eli Lilly and Co., Roche Diagnostics and Zimmer Holdings have put the state...
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Reinbold to sell Chinese autos in Indianapolis: Affordable luxury line likely to hit the streets in 2008

May 22, 2006
Local car dealer Dennis Reinbold, well-known for selling high-end German and Japanese automobiles, will add Chinese vehicles to his lineup, possibly by the end of next year. Reinbold will be among the first dealers in the United States to sell cars made in Wuhu, China, by the state-owned Chery Automobile Co., one of that country's fastest-growing automakers. Reinbold, who is also an Indy Racing League team owner, paid $2 million to sell the Chinese cars, which will be distributed by...
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Ahnafield helps disabled achieve self-dependence: 34-year-old firm makes high-tech mobility products

October 24, 2005
Driving a road sweeper when he was 18 years old, Ryan Kruse never saw the train that slammed into his vehicle and turned him into a quadriplegic. College and other plans for the future seemed out of reach for Kruse, who was paralyzed from his chest down that day 13 years ago. But recently, Kruse, who is working on a second bachelor's degree at IUPUI, traveled to Georgia to celebrate his grandmother's 80th birthday. He drove. With only limited use...
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Premiums continue to climb: Rate increases may dip, but not by very much

October 17, 2005
After four years of double-digit rate hikes, average health care insurance premiums rose less than 10 percent in 2005. And they're expected to rise less than 10 percent again in 2006, according to several national surveys. But excuse employers if they don't get excited about the trend. They are still faced with having to pay much higher prices or trimming benefits-or both. Health care insurance premiums this year increased 9.2 percent, a 2-percent drop in the average increase from the...
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Apartment industry embracing Ball State graduates: Program makes property management a career goal

October 10, 2005
During the 1990s, a booming Indianapolis apartment market was becoming increasingly competitive. About 10,000 units were added to the market in the second half of the decade and professional, well-educated managers to run them were in short supply. Enter the Apartment Association of Indiana, which figured the best way to find the professionals apartment owners needed was to grow their own, so to speak, by creating a post-secondary education degree program for the industry. At that time, Virginia Tech was...
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Parents banking on storage of umbilical cord blood: Founder keeps research alive through Genesis Bank

October 3, 2005
Blood from the umbilical cord of a baby expected to be born in Indianapolis later this month will be collected after her birth and saved for her 5-year-old sister, who has been diagnosed with cancer. The stem cells extracted from the baby's umbilical cord blood might someday save the life of her sibling. While doctors at Riley Hospital for Children wait and see if the young cancer patient responds to standard treatment over the next couple of years, the stem...
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Flexible spending extension expected to be little-used: Planners say total elimination of use-it-or-lose it rule would increase participation, make plans more useful

September 26, 2005
A new Internal Revenue Service rule relaxes the "use it or lose it" rule in flexible spending accounts by extending the period during which expenses may be incurred beyond the end of the plan year. Health care flexible spending accounts allow participants to set aside at the beginning of the year a predetermined amount of pretax money to be used for medical, dental and vision expenses not covered by insurance. Dependent care spending accounts do the same thing for child...
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Late taxpayers get break with state's amnesty plan: Reprieve likely a good opportunity, planners say

September 26, 2005
Individuals and companies that owe taxes to the state are being given a chance to pay up without interest, fees or penalties during a two-month amnesty window opened by the Indiana Department of Revenue. The tax amnesty-the first one offered by Indiana and unusually generous compared with other states' programs-is touted as a way to add an estimated $65 million to the state's coffers and provide delinquent payers with a way to clear debt off their books. More than $1.3...
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IPS seeks property swap: School district will trade prime Mass Ave land if deal is right

September 12, 2005
But an unusual component of the soon-to-be-released request for proposals by Indianapolis Public Schools, the property's owner, has many wondering if anyone has what it will take to win the coveted piece of real estate. What it'll take is the offering of a replacement facility where IPS can move its central transportation facility and other school district operations. "That's the general concept," said SteveYoung, chief of facilities management for IPS. "We're not looking to sell it. We would have to...
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Pervious concrete usage expected to rise in Indiana: Product touted as friendlier to environment, developers

September 5, 2005
"That's called bioaugmentation," said Pat Kiel, executive director of the Indiana Ready Mix Concrete Association. "Concrete science meets bioscience." Nearly 90 percent of pollutants are typically carried by the first 1-1/2 inches of a daily rainfall into rivers and streams, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA requires that the first threefourths of an inch of rain each day be maintained on site until treated. Typically, most of that water, which includes "first flush" contaminants, is collected in...
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Architects from 3 states to showcase work at event: City welcomes AIA's Ohio Valley Region convention

September 5, 2005
The convention kicks off with a shotgun golf outing Sept. 14 at Pebble Brook Golf Club. After golf, attendees can tour five downtown architectural firms. Workshops that begin the next day will follow three tracks of programs-design, community projects and professional development, Kunce said. They will cover a variety of topics including starting a practice, building code requirements, civic initiatives and design- About 250 architects from Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana will converge downtown Sept. 14-17 when Indianapolis hosts the American...
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Insurers thinking younger: Healthy, uninsured and 20? WellPoint, Golden Rule, others would like to sell you a policy

August 29, 2005
WellPoint Inc. and other insurers think they've found a hot new market-offering high-deductible individual health insurance policies to uninsured people who are young and healthy. It's a market insurers historically may have overlooked, based on the misconception that uninsured people are poor and in bad health, said Dana McMurtry, vice president of health policy and analysis at WellPoint. Nationally, more than half the 45 million uninsured earn more than $25,000 a year and more than one-quarter top $50,000 annually, according...
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Student teachers get taste of urban schools: Ball State lets future educators spend semester in IPS

August 29, 2005
For many students majoring in education at Ball State University, thinking about teaching in an urban elementary school conjures up images of unruly students, apathetic parents and old, rundown buildings. These and other similarly negative perceptions are generally inaccurate, say BSU educators, but they are gathered in surveys conducted each year. So the BSU Urban Semester Program places students in an Indianapolis Public School for 16 weeks in the hope they acquire more positive-and accurate-images. "We find students have horrible...
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Sourwine planning to sweeten its local office offerings: Second-generation real estate firm has two new buildings in the works that could nearly double its holdings

August 15, 2005
When Jim Sourwine was 4 years old, he would sit outside the closed door to his father's home office and play with his toy cars. Barred from entering the adult-only world, sounds of paper shuffling and adding machine clacking piqued his interest in his family's real estate business. "I wanted in," Sourwine recalls. By the time he was old enough to file and wash windows for the firm, his father had moved Sourwine Real Estate Services out of his home...
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All-in-one discount pass sells well in opening year: Park officials hope to boost sales of child tickets

August 1, 2005
Nearly a year after White River State Park created a seven-venue park pass, the group is deeming the program a success. The pass provides one-time admission to White River Gardens, the Indianapolis Zoo, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, NCAA Hall of Champions, the Indiana State Museum, an Imax movie and an Indianapolis Indians game. The park sold 518 adult passes at $38 each and 42 child passes at $27 each. It sold out its original number...
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Smaller-sized meetings bring in big bucks for city: Hospitality group sees value in events of all scales

August 1, 2005
Even event planners hire event planners. When Cynthia Howell needed to plan an event in the city for a state health care organization, she called Betsy Ward, a member of the meetings team at the Indianapolis Convention and Visitors Association. With what Howell calls minimal effort on her part, the Indiana Primary Health Care Association Inc. will stay in 50 rooms for two nights at the Sheraton Indianapolis Hotel and Suites at Keystone at the Crossing this fall. The group...
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Cook County jail contract gives local firm big boost: Government Payment Service could double business

July 25, 2005
Government Payment Service Inc.'s credit-card-based jail bond service has proven to be a successful alternative to traditional cash transactions. Now the Indianapolis-based company, which has experienced tremendous growth since its founding in 1997, could double in size, having secured a contract with the country's largest jail system in Cook County, Ill., home to Chicago. Cook County, with 5.3 million people, is the second-most populous county in the nation, topped only by Los Angeles County in California. Processing credit card bail...
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Program hopes to boost women in science: IUPUI to put female science students under one roof to nurture their interest in field often dominated by men

July 18, 2005
The "girls aren't good at science" myth still exists, according to many science educators. That is why a new School of Science program at IUPUI hopes to do its part to dispel the label many say is created as early as elementary school. IUPUI's Women in Science House will literally house together women studying science, providing a nurturing environ ment for female students who often feel isolated, a factor that can cause them to change majors, said Pam Crowell, director...
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Education programs provide job opportunities: Career Connections aims to curb turnover at entry level

July 11, 2005
When Luvinia Hollis moved to Indianapolis from Kentucky about five years ago, the then-42-year-old had few skills, so landing a job was difficult. She lived with her sisters and got some help from her ex-husband, but trying to make ends meet on $100 a week was nearly impossible. "It was so horrible for me, you wouldn't believe," Hollis said. She worked odd jobs for the next few years, making barely more than minimum wage. Eventually, she found her way to...
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Growth in big supply at 3-year-old Milor: Entrepreneur taps experience to land big clients

July 4, 2005
Michelle Taylor's first customer was a north-side hotel that ordered 3,000 janitorial gloves a month. She got up at 3 a.m., processed the order out of her garage, and delivered the gloves in her car. Less than three years later, Indianapolisbased Milor Supply Inc. delivers 36,000 gloves a month, plus janitorial equipment and supplies and safety equipment, to universities, city and state governments, hospitals and a host of other industries across the country. The 35-year-old black female entrepreneur has moved...
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Schools follow different flight paths: Aviation programs see contrasting demand

June 27, 2005
Two aircraft maintenance programs in close proximity to each other are far apart when it comes to successfully filling classrooms with budding mechanics. Times are so tough for Vincennes University's struggling aircraft maintenance program at Indianapolis International Airport's Aviation Technology Center that it asked for permission to conduct three non-aviation degree programs there. The aviation program, which enrolled about 300 students in the mid-1990s, now has about 75. Vincennes officials blame the United Airlines Maintenance hub closure, which displaced 1,200...
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Not-for-profits affect state's bottom line: Health organizations account for more than half of state's not-for-profit workers

June 6, 2005
From 2000 to 2003, a period during which the state experienced an overall decline in jobs, employment in the notfor-profit sector grew. That finding, among others, is part of a study of not-for-profit employment in the state, and an update of a report issued two years ago, by Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy, IU's School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and Johns Hopkins University. The 5-percent increase in not-for-profit employment, compared with a 6-percent decline in the for-profit sector, suggests...
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  1. These liberals are out of control. They want to drive our economy into the ground and double and triple our electric bills. Sierra Club, stay out of Indy!

  2. These activist liberal judges have gotten out of control. Thankfully we have a sensible supreme court that overturns their absurd rulings!

  3. Maybe they shouldn't be throwing money at the IRL or whatever they call it now. Probably should save that money for actual operations.

  4. For you central Indiana folks that don't know what a good pizza is, Aurelio's will take care of that. There are some good pizza places in central Indiana but nothing like this!!!

  5. I am troubled with this whole string of comments as I am not sure anyone pointed out that many of the "high paying" positions have been eliminated identified by asterisks as of fiscal year 2012. That indicates to me that the hospitals are making responsible yet difficult decisions and eliminating heavy paying positions. To make this more problematic, we have created a society of "entitlement" where individuals believe they should receive free services at no cost to them. I have yet to get a house repair done at no cost nor have I taken my car that is out of warranty for repair for free repair expecting the government to pay for it even though it is the second largest investment one makes in their life besides purchasing a home. Yet, we continue to hear verbal and aggressive abuse from the consumer who expects free services and have to reward them as a result of HCAHPS surveys which we have no influence over as it is 3rd party required by CMS. Peel the onion and get to the root of the problem...you will find that society has created the problem and our current political landscape and not the people who were fortunate to lead healthcare in the right direction before becoming distorted. As a side note, I had a friend sit in an ED in Canada for nearly two days prior to being evaluated and then finally...3 months later got a CT of the head. You pay for what you get...

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