ChrisO'Malley

Reporter
Media, advertising, banking, finance, insurance

O’Malley joined IBJ in October 2004, after 16 years of business reporting at The Indianapolis Star and The Indianapolis News.  He moved here from southern Florida during a sub-zero snap in Indiana and tried to quit three days later. O'Malley now regrets leaving Stuart, Fla., where some of the nation’s big business big shots and smart reporters spend the winter. Before his stint in south Florida, he filled the front page of the Evansville Press with stories about Kentuckians who sold Elvis paintings and sorghum syrup out of their car trunks. A geographic anomaly, O’Malley grew up in Indiana, Pa., went to college at California University of Pennsylvania and his three daughters were born in southern China.

Phone:
(317) 472-5235

Recent Articles

Banks beckon wary millennials

August 2, 2014
Institutions have uphill climb to build trust with generation scarred by financial crisis.
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Investor reimbursement fund off to slow start

August 2, 2014
Time required for investigations, prosecutions caused delays.
More

Competition soars at Indianapolis-area airports

July 19, 2014
An airport near Zionsville is upping the ante for Indianapolis International Airport reliever fields.
More

INDIANA 100: Indiana public companies turned in contrasting performances

June 21, 2014
Profit shot up for some, while others fought setbacks.
More

Banks scrambling to find experienced workers

May 17, 2014
Many banks let training languish in an era when consolidation made it easy to snap up veterans. Now, with boomers starting to retire, banks want to pass the baton smoothly.
More

Credit unions back to normal following unusual 2012 high

May 17, 2014
Net income growth among nine big credit unions serving the metro area moderated in 2013 after record earnings for the industry locally and largely across the nation in 2012.
More

Angie’s List namesake extends company brand with nationwide how-to segments

May 17, 2014
Chief Marketing Officer Angie Hicks-Bowman spends an hour and a half each month recording consumer-advice segments hat are downloaded by more than 100 television stations around the country and incorporated into their own consumer news segments.
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BMO Harris shaking up rules of game for car loans

May 17, 2014
BMO Harris Bank’s dealer compensation change—to a flat-fee based on a vehicle’s purchase price—brings to light how consumers have for years unknowingly footed a payment to dealers through higher interest rates on their car loans.
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  1. I could be wrong, but I don't think Butler views the new dorm as mere replacements for Schwitzer and or Ross.

  2. An increase of only 5% is awesome compared to what most consumers face or used to face before passage of the ACA. Imagine if the Medicaid program had been expanded to the 400k Hoosiers that would be eligible, the savings would have been substantial to the state and other policy holders. The GOP predictions of plan death spirals, astronomical premium hikes and shortages of care are all bunk. Hopefully voters are paying attention. The Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare), where fully implemented, has dramatically reduced the number of uninsured and helped contained the growth in healthcare costs.

  3. So much for competition lowering costs.

  4. As I understand the proposal, Keystone would take on the debt, not the city/CRC. So the $104K would not be used to service the $3.8M bond. Keystone would do that with its share.

  5. Adam C, if anything in Carmel is "packed in like sardines", you'll have to show me where you shop for groceries. Based on 2014 population estimates, Carmel has around 85,000 people spread across about 48 square miles, which puts its density at well below 1800 persons/sq mi, which is well below Indianapolis (already a very low-density city). Noblesville is minimally less dense than Carmel as well. The initiatives over the last few years have taken what was previously a provincial crossroads with no real identity beyond lack of poverty (and the predictably above-average school system) and turned it into a place with a discernible look, feel, and a center. Seriously, if you think Carmel is crowded, couldn't you opt to live in the remaining 95% of Indiana that still has an ultra-low density development pattern? Moreover, if you see Carmel as "over-saturated" have you ever been to Chicago--or just about any city outside of Indiana?

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