Bandwagon Colts fans sell tickets

October 31, 2008
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ticketsThat thud you just heard was the sound of thousands of people falling off the Indianapolis Colts bandwagon. Yes, the argument of how soft—or hard core--this converted football town is, has begun anew. A 3-4 start to what was thought to be a promising season in a new stadium has sent more than a few ticket holders to the secondary market looking to recoup a few—hundred—bucks.

Unfortunately, the slow start coupled with a super slow economy has dried up demand for those once coveted Colts tickets. $75 tickets for this Sunday night’s Colts-Patriots games sold on eBay earlier this season for $450 each. I should mention that was before Patriots quarterback Tom Brady went down for the season with a knee injury. Similar tickets are now on sale for $110. I emphasize on sale, because they haven’t sold yet.

“We’re looking at the prospect of taking face value, maybe 10 percent above,” one ticket broker told me this week. “A month ago, who would have thought it would come to this?”

There’s an abundance of Colts tickets available on-line in the $40 range, in some cases at face value. Tickets for less desirable games such as the Houston Texans Nov. 16 are likely to slide below face value, especially if the Colts losing record persists, local ticket brokers said.

Let’s not start bashing fair-weather fans just yet. This could be part of a national trend that has more to do with the recent economic swoon than Colts fans’ true blue streak. eBay’s Stub Hub division reported a “significant slowdown” in the third quarter of this year, and officials for national ticket broker Ace Ticket reported that in some cases they had to drop the prices for tickets to Major League Baseball league championship and World Series games below face value.
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  • Let's make a rule - if you dump your tickets after a losing season, you can't buy season tickets again for 5 years. Indy is full of fair-weather fans, it's ridiculous.
  • Oh, please. Maybe nobody should buy season tickets if you know going in that you can't resell them without a penalty. The Colts are bad, and you will like it!
  • Talk about knee jerk reaction! Just the presence of an article, the headline of which conveys that fans are dumping tickets as a result of a disappointing 3-4 start is preposterous. Sure the team is trying to find itself. Yes there the economy is causing a reevaluation by fans on how to spend their disposable income. But, come on, get a grip. To infer that the local fan base is getting off the band wagon is both unkind and aimed at sensationalism. Everyone, breath in, breath out. No one said that all roads are without pot holes. But the last time I looked, the roads were still there. If we drive carefully enough, we'll get to where we're going.
  • The reality is out of 63,000 regular season ticket holders there are probably 2% to 3% (or 1,200 to 1,900) tickets coming available in various ways due to people lives changing. Between the time they purchase their tickts and the game life changes. It does not mean they have dumped there tickets it just means that can't go to that game or another one because somethin gelse has come up. Likewise, you don't think some of these ticket brokers employees are season ticket holders to help feed their business machine.

    Besides, if I had an item I could sell for a rate of return better than many other things available right now, I probably would sell them. We will never be Green Bay or Chicago but I think we do pretty darn good for our size. To have two professional teams in state of the art stadiums, 3 world class races in the premeire motorsports facility, and a minor league baseball team/stadium to die for - I think we are pretty lucky.
  • Very presumptious. Tabloid type headline. Not good news work. You should be ashamed. Find one fan to go on record and say their fair weather.
  • Starting to become typical of this blog. If you are going to run a headline like that, then post some facts to back it up. Have 1,000 people sold, or 30,000? Is there still a waiting list or has it dried up? All towns have fair weather fans. It is time for many of the tea and crumpet set to sell their tickets and get them into the hands of real fans.
  • I've been a STH for 4 years now (admittedly not that long), and after this season, I will be giving them up.

    Does that make me a bandwagon fan?

    I wear the same (lucky) shirt to every game, stand and scream on every defensive third down, am always there until the end, and always remain upbeat about the season -- even when we play horribly and get stomped. I never miss an away game on TV, and always wear the shirt.

    So I guess I'm a bandwagon fan because I'm not renewing.

    So IBJ, maybe not everyone is a bandwagon fan because the demand is down. Maybe people are finally realizing that the Colts (and other NFL teams) have financially pushed them over the edge. Maybe we're tired of ticket prices raising 10% per year, along with everything else. And maybe LOS isn't quite the majestic wonder that it looks like from South St. once you're in there. I know that for me, something big was lost when the RCA dome went away --- man, I miss that place.

    So-- Mr. IBJ, before you call us all bandwagon fans, you should consider the real world and it's impact on fans decision making when they are writing out those $2000 checks for 8 (real) games. Especially, when we can watch the game in perfect HD at home and still yell, scream, and support our colts --- for free.

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  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

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