Retail roundup: Stone-oven pizza in Carmel, expanding burger joints

September 20, 2013
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Crust Pizzeria Napoletana owner Mohey Osman is targeting the end of next week for the soft opening of his pizza parlor in the Providence Shoppes at 12505 Old Meridian St. in Carmel.

Almost unrecognizable as the former home of a sub shop, Crust’s wood-and-brick dining room will accommodate about 90 diners (three large “community” tables are among the seating options), plus another 25 on an outdoor patio.

But the main attraction is the woodstone oven—and pizza ingredients imported from Italy.

Osman, a native of Egypt, moved to the United States after graduating from business school in 1995 and has been running restaurants ever since. He owned a Chicago-style pizzeria in the Washington, D.C., area for three years before coming to Indiana, where he opened Egyptian Café & Hookah Bar locations in Broad Ripple and West Lafayette. (He sold those after lawmakers restricted smoking in public.)

In addition to Naples-style pizza featuring dough and sauce made fresh daily, Crust’s menu includes salads, sandwiches and calzones. Beer and wine also are available.

The staff of 16 is being trained now, Osman said.

“Crust was a dream I had of a pizzeria … using the same oven and recipes they use over in Naples,” he said.

In other retail news:

— Bagger Dave’s Legendary Burger Tavern is expanding its presence in central Indiana, with plans for a 4,700-square-foot restaurant at 2740 E. 146th St. in Westfield (between Carey Road and Greyhound Pass). Founded in 2006, the Michigan-based burger chain has a location on Michigan Road in Indianapolis and opened an Avon eatery this summer. Next up: Greenwood. The company’s website also lists Fishers as a location that’s “coming soon.” “We believe there is significant potential in the Indiana market,” said Michael Ansley, president and CEO of parent company Diversified Restaurant Holdings Inc., in a prepared statement. Diversified also one of the largest franchisees in the Buffalo Wild Wings chain.

— Speaking of burgers, homegrown Bub’s Burgers is working toward a November opening for location at 576 S. Zionsville Road in Zionsville. The 5,100-square-foot restaurant will anchor South Village of Zionsville West, a retail development taking shape near 106th Street. Bub’s original location is on the Monon Greenway in Carmel.

— Aldi has filed plans for a store in Carmel, at 14620 N. Meridian St. The discount grocer has about 20 central Indiana locations, including stores in Noblesville and just south of Fishers along East 96th Street.

— Jimmy Johns is planning to open a sandwich shop in the new Bridges development under construction at the southeast corner of 116th Street and Spring Mill Road in Carmel.

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  • Bad Baggers
    Went to Bagger Dave's on Michigan Rd. and was sorely disappointed: overpriced. Food just adequate. Not even good service and in a slow night had to wait for the check. Didnt even get a full glass if wine. NOT good. I won't be returning. Will try the new pizza place and can't wait for Bub's Zionsville!!
  • 14620 N. Meridian ?
    Isn't that technically Westfield? Just north of 146th? I would love that as we often go to the one in Noblesville and it would be nice to have one closer - but, where would they go? Into the strip mall next to Best Buy? Used to have a grocery store in there years ago....
    • traffic issues
      Agreed, it is Westfield. If it is locating next to Best Buy won't parking and traffic be an issue? That is already a difficult lot to navigate.

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