Review: Daniel Radcliffe in Broadway's 'The Cripple of Inishmaan'

April 21, 2014
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When you become an international superstar, leading one of the top franchises in movie history, surprise!, doors open for you.

If that happens and you are creatively ambitious, you realize that you now have the tools necessary to build your own doors.

Follow your muse through the door and you can bring a lot of people with you—including people who might not otherwise have known that the rooms you entered or created even existed.

All this is to say I have enormous admiration for Daniel Radcliffe, who could have coasted in Hollywood. Instead, though, he's parlayed Harry Potter popularity into a string of challenging roles on Broadway and in London. Now he’s back on Broadway, lending his considerable talents—and leading his considerable fan base— to a nearly impeccable production of Martin McDonagh's tragicomedy “The Cripple of Inishmaan.”

24761.jpgAnd, at least as far as I could tell, even those who bought tickets just to be in the room with their favorite wizard left the theater as breathlessly blissful as I—who never saw an entire Potter film—did.

“The Cripple of Inishmaan” concerns a group of locals on the titular Irish island in 1934 whose lives are impacted by the presence of a film crew nearby shooting the (real) film “The Man of Aran.” Radcliffe plays Billy, whose disability makes his desire to be a part of the production seem to those around him, at best, delusional. That universe of characters includes his not-quite Aunties, a gossip-monger who is the village’s de facto newsman, a widower with a boat that could take Billy to his dreams, and a young woman whose nasty habits include chucking eggs. To reduce any of them to a few words of description is to trivialize the rich writing of McDonagh and the expert work of the company. (My only quibble is that both Radcliffe and Sarah Greene, as egg-hurler Helen, are a bit pretty for the parts. But that's a beef I can't stew over.)

Colorful, eccentric storytellers are nothing new—what would Irish plays be without them?—but McDonagh does more than keep us guessing about the stories behind the stories. He surprises with who is telling tales. And those revelations pack emotional wallops that are both surprising and, in hindsight, inevitable.

24751.jpgThere’s serious stuff going on here, but “The Cripple of Inishmaan” is also seriously funny. From its opening Radcliffe-free moments to its final revelations, it houses big, big laughs that come not from contrived punch lines but from rich, lived-in characters. Pat Shortt, as unofficial town crier Johnnypateenmike, may be a buffoon, but he's not one you grow tired of. In fact, his centrality to the piece grows as the play goes on. Telescope-coveting Bartley McCormick (Conor MacNeill) starts as a childish teen but becomes surprisingly endearing. And if McDonagh wants to write a spin-off that consists of nothing but sisters Eileen and Kate Osbourne (Gillian Hanna and Ingrid Craigie) complaining and worrying, I’ll gladly take an aisle seat.

As for Radcliffe—that guy from the Harry Potter films—well, this is not a star vehicle. It’s an ensemble piece. And it speaks to both Radcliffe’s talents, his humility, and his eye on the big picture that he’s allowed himself to surround himself with such actors.

And that he proves that he belongs in such good company.
 

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  • Radcliffe is a class act
    Having recently seen him in the revival of "How to Succeed" with John Larroquete, I can say the man does have a lot of talent. He brought a lot of energy and humor to the part. He even accomodated his largely young female fan base by directing his security team to issue wristbands for all the girls (and guys)that wanted them to come back after his evening show (I went to a Saturday matinee) which allowed them a photograph and autograph upon return (they had to show their Playbill or ticket as I recall).
  • We need more McDonagh in Indy
    He's an excellent playwright who always offers a great mix of comedy and drama in his works. I think it has been awhile since once of his shows has been produced here in town. I'm looking forward to seeing Cripple in NYC the first weekend in May.

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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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