NEA grants impact Indy arts groups

July 13, 2009
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IBJ reporter Kathleen McLaughlin guest blogs today.

If our report last week about federal stimulus money for the arts piqued your interest, we have an update this morning from the Indiana Arts Commission. See the list below for details on who gets how much money.

The grants come from the National Endowment for the Arts via one of three agencies -- the state arts commission, Arts Council of Indianapolis, or Arts Midwest, based in Minneapolis. One note: The exact amounts are pending final approval from the NEA.

American Pianists Association, Indianapolis $25,000
Asante Children’s Theatre, Indianapolis $25,000
Booth Tarkington Civic Theatre of Indianapolis $25,000
Children’s Center for Dance Education $22,400
Children’s Museum of Indianapolis $25,000
Eiteljorg Museum, Indianapolis $25,000
Friend of the Frankfort Library, Frankfort $25,000
Fort Wayne Ballet, Fort Wayne $21,300
Harrison Center for the Arts, Indianapolis $7,500
Heartland Truly Moving Pictures, Indianapolis $25,000
Indiana Opera Society, Indianapolis $25,000
Indiana State Museum Foundation, Indianapolis $16,000
Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra $25,000
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Inc. $25,000
Muncie Civic & College Symphony Assn. $15,914
Music for All, Inc., Indianapolis $25,000
Northwest Indiana Symphony Society, Inc. $19,240
Phoenix Theatre, Inc., Indianapolis $17,500
Primary Colours, Inc., Indianapolis $25,000
Richmond Art Museum $15,544
Richmond Symphony Orchestra $15,544
Ridgewood Arts Foundation, Inc. $25,000
Sheldon Swope Art Museum, Inc., Terre Haute $25,000
Young Audiences of Indiana, Indianapolis $25,000

Your thoughts?
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  • Only one dance company on the list. That's a shame. Where is Dance Kaleidoscope? Gregory Hancock? The new ballet company?
  • Where is funding for southern Indiana?
  • I don't know what the application process was for these grants, and that may have something to do with who got money and who didn't. The Children's Center for Dance Education counts in my mind as much as the Fort Wayne Ballet, which would make two dance organizations, but yes, I don't know why DK and Gregory Hancock aren't on the list. They are certainly deserving

    My bigger concern is that these extra grants won't make up for the grants lost because the new state budget has cut IAC so badly (and disproportionately to everything else that was cut). I suspect that for most arts organizations these grants help narrow the gap but don't close it.
  • I don't know why some get grants and some don't. I believe it is because they don ASK and don't PLAN AHEAD. I have looked into grants and the main reason I don't apply is the deadline. You have to think what you are going to do next year or more. It is hard to think of programs and budget for this year. There are people out there that want to give there money to the arts, history and non-profit entertainment but they want to make sure that the money will be used right. Most are looking for a strong board and vision on how the money will be used. It is hard to get a grant but you have to try. A rejection is a teaching tool. You will know what to do next time.
  • The grant process for the stimulus money was an open one. Much effort was made by the IAC to notify the arts community across the state as to the program, its guidelines, and deadlines. It was highly competitive with almost 70 organizations statewide applying for what ended up being 24 grants. I imagine the reviewing committee had to make some tough choices.

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