BioCrossroads Blog Posts

More patients help drug firms pass 'valley of death'

August 11, 2014
Comment(1)
In spite of the beaucoup bucks in the pharma sector, patients, along with their families and committed advocates, are turning out to be better sources of funding for early stage companies because they tolerate risk better than drug companies and investors.
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Most drug money in Indiana funds research. Is that good?

July 28, 2014
Comment(1)
With federal research funding declining, drug companies are taking a larger role funding the medical research happening at IU and universities around the country. That's not the same thing as paying to market drugs, but it's hardly without controversy.
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Life sciences jobs pack 2-for-1 punch

February 24, 2014
Comments(2)
While life sciences companies don’t rack up huge jobs numbers, their relatively high pay means that every job they create is worth two in the rest of the private sector.
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Economic value of hospitals is not in jobs and revenue

October 7, 2013
Comments(7)
The real value of health care, pure and simple, is that it extends our productive lives. And that has a huge economic impact. Too bad Indiana's hospitals keep talking about something else.
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BioCrossroads drops dreams for hospital innovation

August 15, 2013
Comments(7)
In this age of austerity, there's almost no chance of Indianapolis hospitals creating a Cleveland Clinic-like hub of innovation.
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IT revolution coming to local health care

June 19, 2013
Comments(7)
Local providers will increasingly look for help from IT firms like Indigo Biosystems Inc. and VoCare Inc. as part of a coming wave of health IT innovation that is likely to mirror the IT revolution that began 30 years ago.
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  1. I'm a CPA who works with a wide range of companies (through my firm K.B.Parrish & Co.); however, we work with quite a few car dealerships, so I'm fairly interested in Fatwin (mentioned in the article). Does anyone have much information on that, or a link to such information? Thanks.

  2. Historically high long-term unemployment, unprecedented labor market slack and the loss of human capital should not be accepted as "the economy at work [and] what is supposed to happen" and is certainly not raising wages in Indiana. See Chicago Fed Reserve: goo.gl/IJ4JhQ Also, here's our research on Work Sharing and our support testimony at yesterday's hearing: goo.gl/NhC9W4

  3. I am always curious why teachers don't believe in accountability. It's the only profession in the world that things they are better than everyone else. It's really a shame.

  4. It's not often in Indiana that people from both major political parties and from both labor and business groups come together to endorse a proposal. I really think this is going to help create a more flexible labor force, which is what businesses claim to need, while also reducing outright layoffs, and mitigating the impact of salary/wage reductions, both of which have been highlighted as important issues affecting Hoosier workers. Like many other public policies, I'm sure that this one will, over time, be tweaked and changed as needed to meet Indiana's needs. But when you have such broad agreement, why not give this a try?

  5. I could not agree more with Ben's statement. Every time I look at my unemployment insurance rate, "irritated" hardly describes my sentiment. We are talking about a surplus of funds, and possibly refunding that, why, so we can say we did it and get a notch in our political belt? This is real money, to real companies, large and small. The impact is felt across the board; in the spending of the company, the hiring (or lack thereof due to higher insurance costs), as well as in the personal spending of the owners of a smaller company.

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