Life Science & Biotech Blog Posts

Most drug money in Indiana funds research. Is that good?

July 28, 2014
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With federal research funding declining, drug companies are taking a larger role funding the medical research happening at IU and universities around the country. That's not the same thing as paying to market drugs, but it's hardly without controversy.
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Indy patients love their doctors

July 14, 2014
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Indianapolis ranked fifth highest among the nation’s largest cities for the most positive reviews of physicians. On a five-point Patient Happiness Index, the average review by patients scored Indianapolis physicians at a 4.05. San Francisco physicians topped the list.
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Doctors' drug money

July 10, 2014
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Indiana physicians and research organizations reaped more than $25 million in payments from 15 pharmaceutical firms in 2012, according to the most recent data made available by the not-for-profit group ProPublica. Lilly was the biggest spender and the IU medical school was the biggest recipient.
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A silver lining for Endocyte

May 2, 2014
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The news this morning couldn’t have been worse for Endocyte Inc. But if it had to come, the timing couldn’t have been better--because it allowed Endocyte to raise a pile of cash to spend on the other drugs in its pipeline.
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Lilly shares hit all-time high for the John Lechleiter era

April 7, 2014
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Court win last week in a patent challenge to lung cancer drug Alimta pushed Lilly shares higher than they've ever been since April 2007. Since then, the company’s pipeline has produced more misfires than the villains in a James Bond movie
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Life sciences jobs pack 2-for-1 punch

February 24, 2014
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While life sciences companies don’t rack up huge jobs numbers, their relatively high pay means that every job they create is worth two in the rest of the private sector.
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Health care has priced itself out of its own market

November 18, 2013
Comments(11)
It’s no secret the growth of the U.S. economy slowed in the 2000s after the go-go decade preceding it. But the U.S. health care system—hospitals, doctors, drug companies, device makers and health insurers—apparently didn’t get that memo.
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BioCrossroads drops dreams for hospital innovation

August 15, 2013
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In this age of austerity, there's almost no chance of Indianapolis hospitals creating a Cleveland Clinic-like hub of innovation.
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A dose of light reading

August 9, 2013
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Starting with this post, I’m going to periodically give you a peek at my reading list. I’ll highlight reports and reportage that I have found either helpful or provocative. I hope you do, too.
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Me-too diabetes drugs look good enough for Lilly

June 26, 2013
Comments(2)
Eli Lilly and Co. is more than 15 years late to the game in the world of diabetes drugs. And it isn’t bringing much that doctors and patients haven’t already seen. Still, that might be good enough to make a few billion a year.
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IT revolution coming to local health care

June 19, 2013
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Local providers will increasingly look for help from IT firms like Indigo Biosystems Inc. and VoCare Inc. as part of a coming wave of health IT innovation that is likely to mirror the IT revolution that began 30 years ago.
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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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