Politics Blog Posts

Amendment for houses of worship

December 13, 2007
Comments(4)
State Sen. Pat Miller says sheâ??s looking to the future by proposing a constitutional amendment that would protect churches and other houses of worship from someday being taxed. Itâ??s not a â??crisis today,â?? but could become a problem in the future...
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Would a county CEO be a king?

December 12, 2007
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A centerpiece of the sweeping proposal rolled out yesterday by the Commission on Local Government Reform involves consolidating many county offices under one elected official. A county chief executive would appoint the assessor, auditor, coroner, recorder, surveyor, treasurer and even the...
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Kernan, Shepard break china

December 11, 2007
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Folks who think itâ??s time to bring local government from horse-and-buggy days into the modern era have to be smiling about the report that the Commission on Local Government Reform released this morning. The report, written by former Gov. Joe Kernan...
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Solving the tax debate

November 13, 2007
Comments(2)
Gov. Mitch Daniels has proposed capping residential property taxes at 1 percent of a homeâ??s assessed value, rental properties at 2 percent and businesses at 3 percent. Now state Sen. Luke Kenley says the bipartisan commission on taxes he heads will...
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How did media affect Ballard's win?

November 8, 2007
Comments(15)
Election Day was no high point in the annals of Indianapolis media. How could we have missed such a big story, that Greg Ballard was about to upset incumbent Mayor Bart Peterson? Local news organizations treated Ballard as an afterthought until...
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Will business like Ballard?

November 7, 2007
Comments(16)
Dating at least to the â??60s, when Richard Lugar was mayor of Indianapolis, the cityâ??s comeback has been driven by nationally renowned cooperation between government and business. Business interests came out of the woodwork to support Lugar, and subsequent mayors William...
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A new mayor in Indianapolis

November 7, 2007
Comments(7)
Now that Greg Ballard has pulled the big upset, how will Indianapolis be different under his administration? Is his election good or bad for business?
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Arts leaders tout Peterson

November 6, 2007
Comments(11)
The race between Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson and his Republican challenger, Greg Ballard, became interesting in the final days, and not just because Ballard suddenly got traction in a widely publicized poll. In the past few days, two prominent arts leaders...
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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