The big picture Blog Posts

How the recession is hitting artists

March 5, 2009
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Here's some of the info pulled from the National Endowment for the Arts study, released yesterday, titled "Artists in a Year of Recession: Impact on Jobs in 2008." For the full document, click here. -- "The artist unemployment rate grew...
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What if you ran the NEA?

March 2, 2009
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An interesting piece in the LA Times asks a range of high-profile folks (including, at the extremes, Bill Maher and Ann Coulter) what they would do if they ran the NEA. Some interesting thoughts (Warning: If you click on the story,...
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Video: Arts funding roundtable

February 11, 2009
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Got a little time? And some interest in the future of the arts in Indianapolis? Sit back and watch IBJ's arts funding roundtable. Your thoughts, of course, are most welcome.  [kml_flashembed movie="http://weblive.ibj.com/ibj/video/ae/articlePlayer.swf" height="250" width="306" /]
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Arts roundtable: funding

February 6, 2009
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Last week, we at IBJ gathered a panel of local arts professionals to discuss funding issues. A story about that insightful talk will appear in the upcoming print IBJ while a video will appear on line. I'll give you more...
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Should libraries charge?

February 4, 2009
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Should libraries be charging for the hottest materials? The Dallas Public Library thinks so. It's slapped a $5 surcharge on a short list of bestsellers and new-release DVDs. You can find more details here. A slippery slope or a smart move? And,...
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Chicago: Weathering the arts storm

February 3, 2009
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I know I'm not alone among Indianapolis arts lover in taking occassional trips to Chicago for a change-of-venue cultural fix. So I like to keep an eye on the news up there. Well, the Chicago Tribune recently reported on some...
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Good news for the arts?

January 30, 2009
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Last night, on my way to the Phoenix Theatre to see "Love Person," I called and discovered that the play was sold out. And I hadn't made a reservation. On the one hand, I'm frustated that I didn't get to the show...
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Your arts resolutions

December 31, 2008
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Have I ever asked anything of you, loyal readers? Well, now I am. And it's pretty simple. Resolve right now to attend at least one more arts event in 2009 than you did in 2008. Resolve to do more if you feel...
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The art of 'Friending' on Facebook

December 16, 2008
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I've recently joined the Facebook revolution. Yes, I know, I'm late in this, but I also didn't start watching "L.A. Law" until the third season and still haven't seen "Mad Men," so I'm not always an early adaptor. I signed on to Facebook,...
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Indianapolis Star arts coverage

December 7, 2008
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In Sunday's Indianapolis Star, editor Dennis Ryerson commented on staff departures, announcing that "Talk of the Town," Susan Guyett's former column, will continue with another TBA writer. And that Jay Harvey will take over arts reviewing. See the story More

Dark day for Indy arts media

December 4, 2008
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It's a sad day for Indianapolis media and for the arts as massive layoffs gut the Indianapolis Star. Whitney Smith: gone. Chris Lloyd: gone. Susan Guyett: gone. Abe Aamidor: gone.  My thoughts and best wishes go out to these and other talented former Star writers, editors...
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Lou's arts thank-you list

November 26, 2008
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A few things I'm thankful for: --I'm thankful that there's plenty of material to write about in this blog. And that it has found a loyal readership (between 350 and 900 hits a day). --I'm thankful for the smart, insightful, fun responses...
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Success and Malcolm Gladwell

October 7, 2008
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One of the biggest sociological buzz books in recent years was Malcolm Gladwell's "The Tipping Point," in which the journalist looked at the root causes of popularity--what are the circumstances that lead to a sudden skyrocketing of awareness His next book,...
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Bible tour: For better or verse?

October 1, 2008
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Zondervan, one of the world's leading publishers of Bibles, announced that it will be printing a hand-written version, with more than 31,000 Americans performing the penmanship. It's being called Bible Across America and, yes, there's an RV involved. You can find the...
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In Cleveland, a critical clash

September 30, 2008
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Classical music fans, musicians, critics and administrators around the country are taking sides in a battle that's been raging in Cleveland. The situtation: After years of blasting Cleveland Orchestra music director Franz Welser-Most, Cleveland Plain Dealer music critic Donald Rosenberg has...
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Cultural void at the debates

September 26, 2008
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Check out this smart Los Angeles Times piece about the "well, duh" observation that culture won't be a subject for any question during the Presidential debates. "If I were moderating tonight's TV debate," writes Times art critic Christopher Knight, "...
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The death of David Foster Wallace

September 19, 2008
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A few weeks back, in my A&E Season Preview in the print IBJ, I picked as one of the highlighted events David Foster Wallace's scheduled talk at Butler University. That won't be happening. The acclaimed writer, best known for his essays and...
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Lehman's not-for-profit fallout

September 17, 2008
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When a major company goes under, it's not just the employees and shareholders who take hits. It's also the not-for-profits that the company helps support. A Bloomberg story today reports on Lehman Brothers endowment, which contributes to over 200 causes...
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Col. Esserman at Start with Art

September 4, 2008
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Today's Start with Art luncheon at the Convention Center unofficially marks the start of the arts season in Indy. So were you there? If so, what did you think of Col Dean M. Esserman's talk? For those who weren't, Esserman--Chief of Police...
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Ballard not starting with art

September 2, 2008
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For the first time in its 22 year history, the season-kickoff Start with Art luncheon (being held this Thursday) won't include a visit from the Indianapolis' mayor. Greg Ballard, as has been reported elsewhere, will be at the Republican National Convention. The...
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Democrats' composer in residence

August 22, 2008
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David Amram (recently seen here in town at the opening of the Indianapolis Museum of Art's Kerouac/Frank exhibition) has been named Composer in Residence for the Democratic National Convention. See full story here. The story reports that Amram, who has...
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Mayor: budget cannot eliminate arts

August 12, 2008
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And so the Indianapolis arts community exhales. There's still $1 million in the budget and there's less chance of our town being seen as culturally regressive. But what's the underlying message from Mayor Ballard's budget speech? Is it simply that cuts have...
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Arts budget: Scales comments

August 7, 2008
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Earlier today, City County Councillor Christine Scales e-mailed me regarding the city arts budget and the rumored threats against it. I'm reprinting the letter here (and posting it with the earlier blog) with her permission. Your thoughts are, of...
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Cut to: The city's arts budget

August 5, 2008
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The buzz is growing around the arts community about anticipated budget cuts from the Ballard administration to be announced on Monday. See, for example, Justin Ohlemiller's commentary at the Hetrick Communications site here and Gracie Communications' Lisa Sirkin's "Save the Arts" page...
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Mayor Ballard, arts patron

June 26, 2008
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When I attended last night's sneak preview of the "On the Road Again..." exhibition at the IMA, there was Mayor Ballard. When I attended Gregory Hancock Dance Theatre's "Hooray for Bollywood" performance at Pike Performing Arts Center, there was...
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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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