Buckingham plans $45M 'village'

April 28, 2008
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960 N.
                              Meridian St.A local developer has big plans for the neighborhood around the renovated Central Library. Buckingham Cos. plans to spend up to $45 million building new apartments, offices, restaurants and retail space on several parcels it has quietly assembled near its headquarters in the Stokely-Van Camp building. Buckingham bought the Stokely building (southeast corner of Meridian and St. Joseph streets) and surrounding parking lots in February 2007. The firm has a contract to purchase four more parcels nearby—including the former Rollerland skating rink. It also is looking at a request for development proposals for the Ambassador Apartments and a parking lot along Pennsylvania Street. Those properties are being offered for sale by the Library. Plans for 960 N. Meridian St. (shown here) call for first-floor retail and 70 apartments. The company already is in talks with an office-supply chain about taking space. Read the full story here. What do you think?
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  • MMMMM looks more like a Holiday Inn then a downtown apartment building. I like the concept here. It doesn’t have to be 40 stories. But I thing in that area 4 to 6 floors might work and look better. And please dump the balconies. The last things we need to see driving down Meridian Street are green plastic lawn chairs, old barbeque grills and Christmas tree light dotting a building. This is NOT the canal.
  • This is excellent. This area needs a lot of attention. Infill housing and retail will be perfect. After Meridian and Pennsylvannia Streets maybe someone will help Illinois St. Its horrible.
  • I'm not oppsed to the balconies, as many people wanting to live downtown also want to be able to enjoy views by sitting outside and enjoying the weather and sunsets. However, the problem you mention can be combated by having strict rules in the rental agreement and landowners agreement. No individual satellites, no BBQ grills. We have that at my condoplex in downtown with views and it works just fine.
  • Perfect!
  • It's illegal for a condo association or apartment complex to prohibit satellite dishes on private balconies in most circumstances. Local cable companies were going in and negotiating exclusive deals that would prohibit competition by satellite providers in apartment complexes and large condo developments. The FCC stepped in and by and large has prohibited such restrictions.

    If your landlord prohibits installing a satellite dish on an exclusive use balcony, there's a good chance it's an illegal restriction...
  • Nick,

    It isn't an illegal restriction if it is a Condominium complex and it is clearly stated in the covenants and the buyer signs the agreement to abide by the rules of the Association. It's no different than a subdivision restricting the type of mailbox you put in or not allowing a flagpole in the front yard. If the homeowner purchases, they have to abide and follow it.

    City View tower at 38th and Meridian tried to eliminate the use of individual satellites (they are a mix of renters and owners) and did not get a majority of owners and renters to agree to the change. If they would have had it originally in their plan when they first built or a new owner took over, then they could restrict it.

    As far as rentals, I'm not sure what the legality is since you are renting from that owner, i'm assuming you would have to follow the same restrictions as well if the landloard imposes them, or you simply don't move there.

    We are able to get a satellite, but it has to be a majority vote by all owners to have a dish on the roof. The way our building is set up though, each unit is individually wired and not on a circuit, so it wouldn't be cost effective, or realistic for us to have a larger unit. So we are stuck with Brighthouse.
  • Nick, they can designate an area for satellite dishes that are out of sight like on a section of the roof. As long as there is a place to put dishes I believe that the restriction is legal.
  • I hate to give our host grief, but that article does not include a lot of specifics about what will be done with all that land. A lot more information is needed to even being evaluating this.
  • It is against fire code regulations to have a gas or charcoal grill on a balcony or porch that has a roof. Since the floor of the one above is the ceiling for the one below.
  • Wow, great news. The area is ripe for a rejuvenation...they should really build off of the library and make this a thinking mans destination. I love seeing our downtown continue to grow and evolve. We have a lot to be proud of for the Mile-Square.

    Any news on the Ralston Square plans?
  • I used to have an illegal full sized grill on my balcony - man those were some good times.

    I kept it up there because when the propane nozzle broke off - and the regulator couldn't be shut off.

    So... I had to keep using it in order to drain the propane out.
  • It would be nice if all Meridan St. vacant parcels be devloped. Infill will make this street seem more urban. Another Meridian Street parcel needing to be developed is the land north of the Scottish Rite Cathedral. What an excellent place for a multi story housing project. Great views. Any news on that land. A parking lot on Meridian that size seems inappropriate.
  • Bob, the building rendering clearly shows 4 stories. This is an excellent bridge to the mid-rise office buildings at Gateway and Landmark and north of the Interstate.

    It is also the seventh major investment or serious announcement (of new construction or first-class rehab/re-use) on Meridian north of the library in the past two years: Meridian@21, Walgreen's, WFYI, The Lexington, Buckingham HQ, and CVS were the first six.
  • Agree definatly satelite dishes should be banned from balconies, and I think the there shouldn't be any balconies on the meridian street side, or if there are make them not cover the entire facade.

    Can't they just put a place for satelites on the roof and then run a wire to each apartment? I would think this would provide better reception anyways.

    Would be nice for it to be a little taller, but not as tall as the library.
  • Buckingham couldn't plan their way out of a paper sack. This will never see the light of day.
  • Actually for a first rendering, i actually rather like the design, Perhaps with the library's expansion, and style, a more mod neighborhood will emerge in this section of dowtown. Only time will tell though. And big retailers are always a welcoming sign. If a well known company considers propsects well enough to move in, obviously people are their and more are on the way. Another beneficial development for downtown, and nice size infill

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  1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

  2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

  3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

  4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

  5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

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