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Conexus launches statewide online-procurement network

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Businesses that seek to buy local have a new matchmaker. Advanced-manufacturing and logistics initiative Conexus Indiana announced Wednesday that it has launched “Indiana Supplier INsight,” a Web-based business-to-business network that links Hoosier providers and purchasers.

Developed on a software platform by Long Beach, Calif.-based Supplier Gateway, whose clients include Chrysler, Home Depot, Boeing and Raytheon, Indiana Supplier INsight stores information on registered businesses. Users access it online to search for Indiana suppliers in categories such as capability, location, industry classification and women- or minority-owned certification.

The Indiana Economic Development Corp. sponsored the local network’s development. In its test phase, it already gathered more than 3,800 Indiana company registrations.

Conexus believes more than hometown pride will motivate businesses to use Indiana Supplier INsight. By tapping providers nearby, users can streamline  operations, reduce transportation costs and enjoy greater management oversight of procurement.

“Indiana Supplier INsight opens the door for Hoosier businesses,” Conexus CEO Steve Dwyer said in a press release. “Manufacturers look at suppliers all over the country, often unaware of qualified firms right here in their own backyard. This initiative shines a light on these companies and helps them forge new relationships.”

Indiana Supplier INsight isn’t limited to manufacturers and logistics firms. Local firms of all kinds, including professional service providers, can use it for free. To sign up online, visit the network's Web site or visit Conexus’ Web site.

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