Your 'District 9'/'Serenity' thoughts

August 14, 2009
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So were you among those at the "District 9" or "Serenity" screenings last night?

I'll admit, I had every intention of making it a double feature. But after the enthusiastic, GenCon-er packed revisit to the terrific "Serenity," I decided to opt out on the midnight show of newbie "District 9." Call me a wimp, if you must. I hope to get to it this week during traditional hours.

In the meantime, share your thoughts on either (or both) films.?
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  • Excellent show! The symbolism of J'burg was quite evident, but this IS the sleeper hit of the summer.

    The story and method of telling it were both done from a unique perspective and Sharito Copley did an outstanding job. The aliens were done extremely well and they were very realistic.
  • Sea creatures for outer space, Borat becomes an alien, African alien genocide & concentration camps!?!?!?

    I disagree with Tim, District 9 was not good at all. Lou, you're I think you made the right decisions skipping the midnight showing.
  • District 9 is one of those movies that come along rarely to mark an era. The style and story will surely effect how future serious films will have to pay attention to originality. There was a quality of an art film with it's amazingly brilliant CGI.

    Jeremy, I too had to recognize the Boratness of the main character. But that simple-mindedness is integral to portraying the bureaucratic goosestepping that drives us all so crazy amidst a whole range of social, political, and military issues.

    District 9 was so different there will be those who don't like it. I recommend this movie be seen by people who might not normally be intrigued by science fiction and action adventure. Peter Jackson has provided a tale that can be dissected for symbolisms and interpretions and wrangled over till the aliens come home.
  • Serenity just wasn't my thing. I thought the acting was pretty lame, and I couldn't help but think Mal was cheap Han Solo imitation. A bright spot? I thought the assassin character was pretty interesting.

    I think I got more of a kick out of seeing with everyone else was laughing and cheering about.
  • The Serenity crowd was rather feisty last night. A lot of audience laughing, ooohs and awwwws, and clapping is something you rarely see these days. Gen Con crowds are indeed very passionate and the turnout was pretty impressive.

    Lou, I thought you would be partying like a rockstar with the double but even Keith Richards of entertainment journalism needs to pace himself ;-)
  • I'm with Dan and Tim - I'm absolutely NOT a science fiction fan (normally), but I really enjoyed District 9. I don't want to give away any spoilers, but let's say that most of the characters don't behave as you expect them to. Amazing cinematography. The cast (entirely unknown to me) was superb, and the South African setting was something different. And the effects - wow. There are moments of excessive language and gore, but mostly, Peter Jackson did a superb job of building suspense from the first minute, and keeping it going all the way through. Loved it.
  • Serenity, of course, was awesome. I'm not sure I should admit publicly how
    many times I've seen it in the theater. I was amazed how much I still enjoy
    seeing it on the big screen.

    District 9 was impressive. It gets a bit gruesome and icky. Much to think about
    related to how we treat others, w/ obvious allusions to apartheid and the
    holocaust, all wrapped up with heart-pounding action that picks up towards
    the middle of the movie. Fantastic special effects.
  • I was happy to attend the Serenity screening. The crowd was a bit bothersome at times, but it was fun to see true enthusiasm for the movie and the series. I went with a friend of mine who hadn't seen a single episode of Firefly or had even heard of Serenity. My pitch to him was What if Han Solo was more developed in a sci-fi western? He loved it and is now going back to see the series.

    Then my friend and I raced back to Carmel to catch the midnight screening of District 9 with more friends and we all really liked that. I was amazed how concise the movie was. There wasn't a wasted second to it. It was a preachy movie, but it never had sermons that talked down to you. It's a movie where I can call it entertaining and vile in the same sentence without using either word as negative. It's an impressive movie.
  • District 9 was not at all what I was expecting in a movie about aliens living on earth which is a good thing. This is most likely due to the movie being set in a not too distant future Johannesburg, South Africa. There was plenty of action, chases, and futuristic weapons, but that didn’t occur until the latter portion of the movie. Most of the film builds the story of a jovial government agent and the outcome of the task he has been tapped to perform within the area housing the aliens (or Prawns) called District 9.

    Without giving away too much I must warn future movie goers that you really won’t be rooting for the majority of humans to succeed in their endeavors in District 9, indeed, it is often the Prawns who show more humanity than their host species. While watching the movie I thought about how much of what happened to the Prawns are actually happening to people throughout various locations around the globe who are at the mercy of others and who don’t have a mother ship hovering nearby to potentially carry them back home.
  • It was good. Twilight Zone meets Alien Nation. A little formulamatic towards the end, but the message was awesome and it didn't get lost in the effects.
  • I don't even know what to think. So much more than an alien movie and yet I'm not sure I appreciated the comparison that made it some sort of moral message movie. I just don't know.

    I do know that I can't stand that home movie style. The shaky camera makes me nauseous. I also know that without a single recognizable actor in the movie, I was impressed with the acting and even though I wanted to leave in the first 20 minutes or so...after that, even if I didn't LOVE the movie, I liked it enough and I'm happy to have seen it.
  • I am not a sci-fi person. I truly did not appreciate this film.
    I will be seeing Shorts and Adam this week.
    Do you have any passes for Post Grad?
  • Lou,
    Thanks for the passes. I really enjoyed District 9. I hope that it makes lots of money. It's nice when you can see a big-budget scale movie with characters and a story that you care about and it doesn't have to have big stars or big money.

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