First Dunkin impressions

June 13, 2008
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The downtown Dunkin looks like it'll be ready before the June 26 target opening date. Workers are installing the signs today, so I thought I'd post this photo by our own Robin Jerstad. Thoughts on the new look?Dunkin
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  • Very sad to see that this store is only going to be open 5a-10p. Was intrigued to see that they plan to open a store 10th/meridian, and ohio/illinois in the future. I hope the sign isnt finished
  • I still wish that corner was developed into a high rise building, of course, incorporating the Dunkin Donuts on the first level, but with apartments on upper levels. I don't understand why the eastern portion of Washington Street is still blighted to this day, compared to the rest of downtown.
  • I think it is pretty obvious that this is a stop-gap measure. They didn't put so much money into the building that if someone purchased it, the value would increase so dramatically. Does anyone know the square footage of the buildings footprint? I'm saying no more than 1500-2000(probably on the lower side). So I think we'll have to wait until a few of the surrounding buildings can be purchased and the parcels combined before we'll see a long-range development here, something around 10-15 stories more than likely.
  • In Indianapolis, urban is a dirty, dirty word. So we have to add 'sub' to make things nice and friendly
  • I can't wait to grab a breakfast sandwich!

    this corner is not going to be blighted for much longer.. there is going to be like 10 restaurants in the next year or two. Hopefully some retail type business follows!
  • yes there only two types of people in Indy either you are urban or you are suburban and the two just don't seem to be able to get along.

    But, I think the vocies of the urban seem to be growing louder.
  • Urban is one of the most beautiful words I have ever embraced...I will never go back to my formerly lackluster living situation.
  • I think it's a great design. Many big cities have these types of low rise buildings peppered throughout their downtowns and this one seems appropriate here. I think the spinning sign and retro look add a great ambiance to the corner. It feels cityish and not suburban IMO. It will increase foot traffic to that area and I hope it helps revitalize the buildings next to it as well.
  • What happened to all the chrome from the renderings?

    Can you present something, get it approved, and then just change the plans without telling anyone?
  • I agree the east portion of Washington St. is a disgrace. There are wonderful buildings along there that need attention. Also the huge lot across the street from Dunkin Donuts needs to be developed. I think this will bring some activity to this corner. This is an excellent use for this corner until something larger can be developed.
  • I walked past there today and they were having a training class for employees and outside they were still fiddling with the sign. Inside though it looks ready to go. It already has merchandise in it like the bags of coffee.
  • What is next to Dunkin?
  • Nonekin
  • that sign sucks. duh.
  • the spinning sign is HORRIBLE! The letters are way too small for that large a sign. The tile work on the side of the building is cool though, and the orange canopies are striking...it's just that stupid spinny sign!

    Also, what did the poster think were going to be the hours? 5-10 seems plenty long enough. Especially for that neighborhood, why would they want to stay open later, or even 24 hours? The 5 oclock opening should cater to the early risers, and the 10, should get the coffee kicks from Conseco.

    All in all, good development. Hope more is coming to that part of Washington.
  • The old Roslyn Bakery sign needs to be replaced, not retrofitted with a new name.

    It is odd shaped can be seen all over town with tax preparation services, pizza places, fireworks outlets and other sundry businesses.

    I would think a Dunkin Donuts chain would have the resources to market itself correctly.
  • Also, what did the poster think were going to be the hours? 5-10 seems plenty long enough. Especially for that neighborhood, why would they want to stay open later, or even 24 hours?

    I'll agree that 5a - 10p would be good hours, although this neighborhood gets traffic past 10p especially Thu, Fri & Saturday. 12/1am would be nice for the weekends.

    I have no problem with the sign and prefer the tile over the stainless steel.
  • I drove by today and the Dunkin sign is up on the old pole sign; there were a bunch of employees standing in line, so they must have been training.
  • 5a-10p are you kidding me? I'm surprised they even want to stay open after sunset at that location. How would you like to be the person at the counter being accosted by homeless bums (applause to the mayor for trying to fix that problem) and, who buys donuts at midnight downtown anyway? Those late nighters go to Whitecastle or Steak and Shake.
  • ATTN: Brickyard400

    10p does not equal midnight.. also the more establishments open later in that area the better
    it will be.. It's already a ok area to be in late at night anyway.

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  1. I could be wrong, but I don't think Butler views the new dorm as mere replacements for Schwitzer and or Ross.

  2. An increase of only 5% is awesome compared to what most consumers face or used to face before passage of the ACA. Imagine if the Medicaid program had been expanded to the 400k Hoosiers that would be eligible, the savings would have been substantial to the state and other policy holders. The GOP predictions of plan death spirals, astronomical premium hikes and shortages of care are all bunk. Hopefully voters are paying attention. The Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare), where fully implemented, has dramatically reduced the number of uninsured and helped contained the growth in healthcare costs.

  3. So much for competition lowering costs.

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