Forty Under 40 Nomination Form



Online Nomination Form
IBJ seeks rising leaders for 23nd annual "Forty Under 40"
On February 2, 2015, Indianapolis Business Journal will recognize 40 central Indiana business and professional leaders. We are looking for people who have achieved a level of success that is rare at a young age. Examples of civic involvement and leadership outside the workplace will also be considered. Nominees must be younger than 40 as of the February 2, 2015, publication date.

Previous honorees are not eligible for nomination.

The deadline for nominations is September 26, 2014.
 

Nominee Information

Nominee must reside in Marion County or surrounding counties.

Summary of why nominee deserves to be in Forty Under 40

Career Achievements

Community Leadership

 
 
 

Board Positions

Nominator Information

   
   
   

Send any letters of recommendation or other supporting materials to Norm Heikens, Associate Editor, Indianapolis Business Journal, 41 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, IN, 46204, or email the documents to nheikens@ibj.com.

     
   

* Nominee's First Name is Required *
* Nominee's Middle Initial is Required *
* Nominee's Last Name is Required *
* Nominee's Cell Phone is Required *
* Nominee's Title is Required *
* Company Name is Required *
* Address is Required *
* City is Required *
* Zip Code is Required *
* Nominee's E-Mail is Required *
* Nominee's E-Mail is Required *
* Business Phone is Required *
* Nominee's Birth Date is Required *
* Nominee's Birth Date is Required *
* Highest Degree is Required *
* College or University is Required *
* Nominator's First Name is Required *
* Nominator's Last Name is Required *
* Nominator's Phone Number is Required *
* Nominator's E-Mail is Required *
* Nominator's E-Mail is Required *
* Relationship to Nominee is Required *
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  1. You are correct that Obamacare requires health insurance policies to include richer benefits and protects patients who get sick. That's what I was getting at when I wrote above, "That’s because Obamacare required insurers to take all customers, regardless of their health status, and also established a floor on how skimpy the benefits paid for by health plans could be." I think it's vital to know exactly how much the essential health benefits are costing over previous policies. Unless we know the cost of the law, we can't do a cost-benefit analysis. Taxes were raised in order to offset a 31% rise in health insurance premiums, an increase that paid for richer benefits. Are those richer benefits worth that much or not? That's the question we need to answer. This study at least gets us started on doing so.

  2. *5 employees per floor. Either way its ridiculous.

  3. Jim, thanks for always ready my stuff and providing thoughtful comments. I am sure that someone more familiar with research design and methods could take issue with Kowalski's study. I thought it was of considerable value, however, because so far we have been crediting Obamacare for all the gains in coverage and all price increases, neither of which is entirely fair. This is at least a rigorous attempt to sort things out. Maybe a quixotic attempt, but it's one of the first ones I've seen try to do it in a sophisticated way.

  4. In addition to rewriting history, the paper (or at least your summary of it) ignores that Obamacare policies now must provide "essential health benefits". Maybe Mr Wall has always been insured in a group plan but even group plans had holes you could drive a truck through, like the Colts defensive line last night. Individual plans were even worse. So, when you come up with a study that factors that in, let me know, otherwise the numbers are garbage.

  5. You guys are absolutely right: Cummins should build a massive 80-story high rise, and give each employee 5 floors. Or, I suppose they could always rent out the top floors if they wanted, since downtown office space is bursting at the seams (http://www.ibj.com/article?articleId=49481).

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