Indians score hefty profits

December 15, 2008
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indiansIn good times and bad, the Indianapolis Indians continue to be a hit with local sports fans. The Indians scored a $1.23 million profit this year on $8.7 million in revenue, according to the publicly traded company’s most recent financial disclosure. That compares to a profit of $1.27 million on revenue of $8.22 million in 2007.

Revenue gains were offset by slight increases in expenses, with the most notable a $320,000 bump in advertising and promotion to $1.7 million. Grounds operation expenses were up slightly to $3.52 million and general and administrative expenses bumped up to $1.35 million.

As a result, Indians stockholders will get a dividend of $350 per share. That’s the same as last year, but up from $200 per share in 2006. The team is offering to buy back shares of stock currently for $21,328 per share. The stock, which is listed in the Pink Sheets, has traded for as high as $25,000 in the past year. Some stockholders believe the thinly traded stock is worth more than $30,000 per share. If you want to get in on the action, you might be a little hard pressed. There are only 774 shares outstanding. At $25,000 per share, that would value the team at $19.4 million.

There’s a reason why Indians stock is so valuable. It’s one of a dwindling number of sports properties that makes any money in Indianapolis. And it’s easily the most consistent.

Even in a year when the economy was less than stellar, the Indians saw increases in ticket revenue, concession sales and advertising income. Signboard advertising increased almost $100,000 from 2007, hitting $592,850. Promotional advertising revenue was up more than $130,000 to $858,827 and advertising in the team’s game-day souvenir program also was up. This shows that corporate Indiana understands the value of reaching this predictably solid audience.

This year the Indians drew 606,155, the team’s highest attendance mark since 2000. That put the team’s average attendance at 8,538 per game. If the economy continues to stagger, sports marketers think sports fans looking for relatively inexpensive entertainment options, could push the Indians attendance higher next season.
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  • This is great news for the average sports fan that can't afford to spend $100-$200 per game for a family outing to a sporting event. A spot on the lawn with the kids and a picnic basket is still the best value in town. I agree that the Indians will likely see another year of record crowds. People won't stop spending money, just spending it more wisely. And an Indians game is a bargain in my book!
  • I echo Boomer's sentiments. For a family of four on a budget there are few better ways to spend an evening in the summer than on the law at the Vic.

    As Harry Carray used to say You can't beat fun at the old ballpark.
  • Who does the Indians marketing? It's nice to see they convinced the Tribe to pony up some money for marketing - it definitely paid off this season.
  • It's my understanding that locally based Hirons & Co. handles advertising/marketing for the Indians.
  • As an HR Manager I convinced our president to purchase season tickets last year and it was a big hit among employees and clients. Even though the economy has somewhat impacted us, we have already renewed for 2009 since their prices are so low. We are proud to back the Indians.
  • Here's a web address that should appear hyperlinked in the blog: http://www.ibj.com, and here's www.ibj.com

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  1. By the way, the right to work law is intended to prevent forced union membership, not as a way to keep workers in bondage as you make it sound, Italiano. If union leadership would spend all of their funding on the workers, who they are supposed to be representing, instead of trying to buy political favor and living lavish lifestyles as a result of the forced membership, this law would never had been necessary.

  2. Unions once served a noble purpose before greed and apathy took over. Now most unions are just as bad or even worse than the ills they sought to correct. I don't believe I have seen a positive comment posted by you. If you don't like the way things are done here, why do you live here? It would seem a more liberal environment like New York or California would suit you better?

  3. just to clear it up... Straight No Chaser is an a capella group that formed at IU. They've toured nationally typically doing a capella arangements of everything from Old Songbook Standards to current hits on the radio.

  4. This surprises you? Mayor Marine pulled the same crap whenhe levered the assets of the water co up by half a billion $$$ then he created his GRAFTER PROGRAM called REBUILDINDY. That program did not do anything for the Ratepayors Water Infrastructure Assets except encumber them and FORCE invitable higher water and sewer rates on Ratepayors to cover debt coverage on the dough he stole FROM THE PUBLIC TRUST. The guy is morally bankrupt to the average taxpayer and Ratepayor.

  5. There is no developer on the planet that isn't aware of what their subcontractors are doing (or not doing). They hire construction superintendents. They have architects and engineers on site to observe construction progress. If your subcontractor wasn't doing their job, you fire them and find someone who will. If people wonder why more condos aren't being built, developers like Kosene & Kosene are the reason. I am glad the residents were on the winning end after a long battle.

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