Madison Avenue retail planned

July 7, 2009
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Madison projectA local developer is planning a retail strip center for a run-down parcel along Madison Avenue south of downtown. The plans by Keystone Construction Corp. call for a 25,000-square-foot retail center at 1400 Madison Ave., across the street from Sisters' Place Restaurant, and just south of Madison Plaza, a 180,000-square-foot office conversion project also by Keystone. The 2.8-acre retail site now is home to three vacant industrial buildings and one remaining wall from an old brick warehouse. Keystone plans to seek LEED certification for the project, which also includes space for two outlot users. Demolition of the old structures is scheduled for later this month. More details are here.
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  • The building at the top right of the outline is freaking amazing looking.. please don't tear it down. I think it houses a photography studio.
  • Cory, Check out Keystone Construction's mixed use project in Carmel. Excavation is almost complete for the 2 story underground parking.
  • I'm not sure how amazing looking the remains of a burned down warehouse are. I'm a little sad to see the photography studio close because it is a great space for that, but this neighborhood needs this retail/eatery. Hopefully their remodeled office complex helps them lease the space far more successfully than the space they remodeled at Hanna and Madison. It's empty except for a fitness center that just opened.
  • There is no question that a state agency has already agreed to lease space. Keystone already owns Madison Plaza, which houses many Marion Cty offices. They would not be doing this without some heavy incentives and promises behind the scenes.
  • This is a most welcome development, I live not far from here by Garfield Park and there isn't a whole lot around. Hopefully it will contain relevant services that you have to drive to Greenwood or elsewhere to find. I hope this is a sign of more investment in the near Southside.
  • As a former Garfield Park Resident, I agree this will be great for the corridor. It is sad that two of the biggest blights on this corridor or government owned. The old IFD station that sits on the east side and the INDOT Sub garage on the westside. If these could be cleaned up, moved or whatever, it would go along way to cleaning up this stretch. Also, it would be nice to redevelop the auto auction just north of the planned development.
  • I'm a southsider and would love to see this succeed, but has anyone seen a demographic study of this area. Where will the customers come from to support this? The southside has enough Dollar General Stores and flea markets.
  • Keystone recently converted the old Lo Bills at Hanna and Madison to University Shoppes. So far the only tenant is Anytime Fitness. I hope they can pull it off. I agree with Merv however. The area doesn't need more payday loan stores either. The Gateway Business Alliance is trying to get this area spruced up and has quite a vision for that corridor south of Manual HS. http://www.gatewaybusinessalliance.com/
  • Seriously if we get another Dollar Store, White Castle or PLS Check Cashing in the area it will be a huge missed opportunity. There are a lot of professional people in the Garfield park area, that have to drive a significant way to get to business that appeal to them.
  • Merv, I can't imagine anyone committing a couple of million without looking at demographics. Or maybe they're just looking at traffic counts.
  • Yeah, a relocated BMV office, and perhaps a Subway. Southsider: I would suspect you need a lot more than the several scores of professional people in the Garfield Park area to bring the type of commercial outlets you desire. Wouldn't there need be a lot more middle to high-end residential development to result in a reversal of the glut of empty/underutilized retail space occupied by fast food and check cashing places on any of the near -sides? It seems to be the same sad story, in either direction of downtown. Only the near northside seems to be slowly moving toward providing the type of neighborhood retail and entertainment options that sustain a middle to upper middle class urban neighborhood. This being after many years of steady improvement and redevelopment in the Old Northside, Herron-Morton, FCP, and others. And even on the northside, it seems to be a slow progression, on the retail side.
  • Graffiti covered buildings and crumbling sidewalks are what makes this area special. The character of the neighborhood should not be destroyed, although leveling that old warehouse a couple years ago messed up the look badly. Let Carmel have the Applebees.
  • idyllic indy: I feel what you are saying, I am not asking for Saks, but possibly a place you can get fresh cilantro, or maybe a decent pizza as they suggested might be a tenant. I know it is probably wishful thinking. But to your point I know a lot of people on the Southside that would appreciate mid-end development, not just another junk store or dollar store. There is just kind of a void in this area. You have to go to Southport, Greenwood or up north to get most things. Fountain Square is coming a long nice, but most eateries there are kind of pricey.
  • Maybe a real farmers market may work since the one downtown doesn't seem to get it.
  • Ikea! Well, maybe not. Just more nail salons, wireless phone stores, drycleaners and chinese buffets. Great.
  • The early adopters (hipsters, college students, gay couples) are already starting to look further afield than Fountain Square and are starting to show up in Garfield Park and Babe Denny. Hopefully, this is just the start of a turnaround in what should be some of Indy's coolest neighborhoods.
  • Thundermutt. That was my exact thought. I don't think this has anything to do with local demographics. It's all about the car trips, which means more drive-through fry-pits or suburban strip malls. Do you expect Indy leadership to demand any better? I don't.
  • Jeff:

    What does gay couples have to do with Indy's coolest neighborhoods?
  • Berwick:
    Gay people have traditionally been among the first to move into less desirable areas and start the transformation rolling........Mass Avenue is a prime example.......
  • ^^Yup, What he said^^

    Like it or not, Berwick Guy, gay couples are often the ones who move into downtrodden neighborhoods and put in the sweat equity that kickstarts rebirth. Fletcher Place and Herron-Morton are other examples.
  • Jeff,

    Thanks for the reply, however I said nothing about liking or not liking. That is irrelevant. I just wanted to know the connection.
  • BG,

    Sorry to jump to conclusions.

    J
  • You've been very quiet Mr. Cory. Perhaps there is a major story for this weekend you're working on? Any clues would be greatly appreciated. :)
  • Gay couples are so yesterday. The really cool neighborhoods have gay triples.
  • This story makes it sound like Keystone is doing some great service to the community by tearing down vacant buildings. The only reason they are vacant is because Keystone bought the property and ran out the occupants. A photography business, IPL storage,and another business inhabited those buildings. The location was a good one for the Photography studio. Hope the neighborhood enjoys another Subway or Chinese buffet instead.

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  1. A Tilted Kilt at a water park themed hotel? Who planned that one? I guess the Dad's need something to do while the kids are on the water slides.

  2. Don't come down on the fair for offering drinks. This is a craft and certainly one that belongs in agriculture due to ingredients. And for those worrying about how much you can drink. I'm sure it's more to do with liability than anything else. They don't want people suing for being over served. If you want a buzz, do a little pre-drinking before you go.

  3. I don't drink but go into this "controlled area" so my friend can drink. They have their 3 drink limit and then I give my friend my 3 drink limit. How is the fair going to control this very likely situation????

  4. I feel the conditions of the alcohol sales are a bit heavy handed, but you need to realize this is the first year in quite some time that beer & wine will be sold at the fair. They're starting off slowly to get a gauge on how it will perform this year - I would assume if everything goes fine that they relax some of the limits in the next year or couple of years. That said, I think requiring the consumption of alcohol to only occur in the beer tent is a bit much. That is going to be an awkward situation for those with minors - "Honey, I'm getting a beer... Ok, sure go ahead... Alright see you in just a min- half an hour."

  5. This might be an effort on the part of the State Fair Board to manage the risk until they get a better feel for it. However, the blanket notion that alcohol should not be served at "family oriented" events is perhaps an oversimplification. and not too realistic. For 15 years, I was a volunteer at the Indianapolis Air Show, which was as family oriented an event as it gets. We sold beer donated by Monarch Beverage Company and served by licensed and trained employees of United Package Liquors who were unpaid volunteers. And where did that money go? To central Indiana children's charities, including Riley Hospital for Children! It's all about managing the risk.

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