2011 Women of Influence

2011 WOMEN OF INFLUENCE

November 3, 2011
 IBJ Staff
IBJ’s Women of Influence program recognizes central Indiana women who exemplify the traits required to be outstanding leaders in their chosen fields.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Angela D. Adams

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
As one of the city’s top immigration attorneys, Angela D. Adams is at the center of the debate on reform.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Christine Altman

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
This Hamilton County commissioner is a leader in the drive to improve public transportation in central Indiana and promotes regional cooperation among the diverse communities of central Indiana.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Allison Barber

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
The head of the state’s newest public university brings years of White House and Pentagon experience to her position. She hopes to revolutionize our state’s approach to higher education by championing distance learning as key to closing the Hoosier degree gap.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Shokrina Radpour Beering

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
As one of the few women practicing real estate law, she is determined to make life easier for women who follow in her footsteps. She founded IndyCREW, an organization that promotes and supports women in commercial real estate.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Kerry Hyatt Blomquist

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
The legal director of the Indiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence, she created programs to offer victims immediate protection from the time they enter a hospital and founded the state’s first domestic-violence education program for attorneys.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Marion E. Broome

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
The dean of Indiana University's School of Nursing, she is a leader in nursing research, service and education. She helped pioneer the treatment of pain in children and founded the Society of Pediatric Nurses.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Tamika Catchings

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
The Indiana Fever forward founded the Catch the Stars Foundation, which serves 1,500 underprivileged youth in central Indiana every year, and has a leadership role in a number of other charities that benefit children.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Myra Borshoff Cook

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
She founded the city’s largest public relations agency and has become a force in the not-for-profit world.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Deborah J. Daniels

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
Now a partner at Krieg DeVault LLP, herwork in homeland security led to her involvement in the nation’s response to 9/11. She also has helped lead many of the city’s most important charities.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Marianne Glick

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
She has been a philanthropist and high-level volunteer par excellence, helping to lead more than 20 local organizations. She has focused particularly on organizations benefiting women.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Martha Hoover

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
Against all odds, the president of Patachou Inc. has built a thriving group of restaurants that have transformed the local dining landscape by emphasizing fresh, local ingredients and careful preparation.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Ann Lathrop

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
The first woman head of the Capital Improvement Board took over at a critical juncture. Nearly two years into the job, she has succeeded in avoiding a potential $47 million deficit and signing a three-year deal with the Pacers to remain at Conseco Fieldhouse. Next up: Super Bowl XLVI.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Lauren K. Robel

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
The first female dean in the 169-year history of the Indiana University Maurer School of Law has raised tens of millions of dollars, improved the caliber of students and moved the school into the top 25 in the nation.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: JoEllen Florio Rossebo

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
This outspoken advocate for arts education has expanded programs in spite of the recession and built an organization that now brings music, dance, visual arts and theater to nearly 200,000 Indiana children each year.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Marsha Stone

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
As CFO of the Indianapolis Airport Authority, she led the financing for the new terminal and is shaping local economic development by attempting to increase nonstop flights into Indianapolis.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Diane Thomas

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
As president and CEO of the International Center, she has been a driving force in making Indiana more global.
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2011 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Patricia A. Wachtel

November 3, 2011
Tawn Parent
She put three decades of corporate experience to work at Girls Inc., which has quintupled the number of girls it serves at a fraction of the cost.
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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