2012 Women of Influence

2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Sheri Alexander

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Alexander is a top local insurance executive who specializes in employee benefits and in opening doors for women in a male-dominated field.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Keira Amstutz

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Amstutz leads a statewide organization whose goal is to deepen the connection between Hoosiers and their communities.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Marcia Barnes

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
In her role as the top executive at a fast-growing local company, Barnes preaches leadership and public service.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Julie Bielawski

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Bielawski started and runs the city’s fastest-growing woman-owned business, which sells services to the state, city and large corporate clients.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Mary Boelke

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Boelke is the first woman to run Deloitte’s Indianapolis office, which is one of the city’s biggest accounting firms.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Karen Crotchfelt

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
The newspaper industry veteran is responsible for steering the state’s largest daily through a tumultuous time for media properties.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Angela Dabney

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
As head of fundraising for the local United Way, Dabney and her team are responsible for landing the donations that fuel many of the city’s human services providers.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Cheri Dick

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Dick is steward of one of the area’s oldest performing arts organizations and has overseen its transition to a new home in Carmel.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Cynthia Hubert

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
A former banker on the East Coast, Hubert has spent a dozen years working for local not-for-profits and now heads one of the area’s largest hunger-relief organizations.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Christie Kelly

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
After a long career at GE, Kelly is the executive responsible for the financial performance of one of the city’s biggest commercial real estate firms.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Maggie Lewis

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
As an elected member and president of the city’s legislative body, Lewis plays a key role in local government.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Charlotte Lucas

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
She’s half of the husband-and-wife team that runs Lucas Oil, a high-profile car products company with far flung business interests and important investments in local professional sports.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Pauline Moffat

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Moffat took a startup performing arts festival and grew it into a fixture on the local arts scene. It’s now a vehicle for turning locals into playwrights and transforming the city’s culture.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Judge Margret G. Robb

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
Robb leads the busiest appeals court in the state and mentors young lawyers.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Luci Snyder

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
A long-time member of Carmel city government, Snyder is now chair of the city council’s finance committee and plays a big role in figuring out how to pay for Carmel’s ambitious goals.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Angela E. White

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
As head of one of the city’s most successful philanthropy consulting firms, White has become a nationally respected expert on the not-for-profit world and the role of women in philanthropy.
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2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Beth White

November 1, 2012
Marc and Martha Allan / Special to IBJ
White oversees the budget of the local court system, but she’s better known for making sure election day in Marion County runs smoothly.
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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