Agriculture/Farming

Summer is key time for those who raise Christmas trees

August 7, 2010
Joe Jasinski
Christmas and July harmonize like a blizzard on Independence Day, but the summer months are perhaps the most vital for Tom Dull and his wife, Kerry, who raise 23,000 Christmas trees on their peaceful farm in Thorntown.
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Consumers facing record prices for bacon

August 4, 2010
Bloomberg News
The U.S. hog-breeding herd is near the smallest on record, and wholesale pork-belly prices are up 72 percent in the past year, to the highest price since at least 1998.
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Indiana working on phosphorous limits for lakes

July 19, 2010
Associated Press
The Indiana Department of Environmental Management says the rule would impact sewage treatment plants upstream of lakes.
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Looking out for summer garden pests

June 26, 2010
Just because it's summer, don't expect tree and shrub pests to go on vacation.
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Indiana's biggest private companies majored in the basics in 2009Restricted Content

June 19, 2010
Martha P. Allan
Health care, plastics, other fundamental consumer needs kept some companies on upswings.
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Becky Skillman's blog from China

June 9, 2010
Becky Skillman
Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman is traveling to China with a delegation of state officials and business and community leaders through June 10. Skillman is blogging about their experiences as the group works to build relationships and attract Chinese investment to Indiana.
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Urban farmer in Indianapolis hopes he's the first of many

June 5, 2010
Norm Heikens
Matthew Jose figures that if enough people follow him into urban farming, vacant and abandoned property will flourish with productivity, consumer diets will improve, and worn neighborhoods will get new life.
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Hoosiers begin agriculture trade mission to China

June 2, 2010
Joe Jasinski
A 26-member delegation of Hoosiers, including Lt. Gov. Becky Skillman, arrived Wednesday in Hangzhou, Indiana’s Chinese sister state since 1987, for an agriculture-focused economic development trade mission.
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Indiana has millions to pass out for renewable energy projects

May 8, 2010
 IBJ Staff
The federal money is for renewable energy systems, energy-efficiency improvements, energy audits and renewable-energy feasibility studies.
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U.S. farmers planting corn at record pace

April 26, 2010
Bloomberg News
U.S. corn farmers may have planted more acres last week than in any week ever as dry weather and more-productive equipment sped up fieldwork.
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Rising prices could help pork producers bounce backRestricted Content

April 24, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
The prices hogs are fetching this year will help farmers begin to climb out of the crater of 2008 and 2009. Average pork prices may approach record levels this year, Purdue University agricultural economist Chris Hurt predicted, up to $53.63 per hundred pounds. The record is $55.44 per hundred pounds, set in 1982.
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Timber industry seeks respect, profit from 'green' standards

March 6, 2010
Chris O'Malley
Why should bamboo imported from Asia or steel made through intensive use of energy be consider greener than locally grown trees? timber interests ask.
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Farmland once targeted for housing still being plowedRestricted Content

January 23, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
Farmers who might have worried about losing their livelihood to new homes or retail have gotten a little breather.
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Egg industry debates ethics of cage sizes

November 19, 2009
 IBJ Staff and Associated Press
The answers could have big implications for the egg industry, which counts Indiana as one of its leading producers. The Hoosier state ranked third in egg production in 2008, trailing only Iowa and Ohio.
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Dow AgroSciences' revenue, profit fall on lower crop prices

October 22, 2009
Dow AgroSciences, the local subsidiary of Midland, Mich.-based Dow Chemical Co., said Thursday that revenue fell 20 percent and profits plummeted in the third quarter due largely to lower crop commodity prices.
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EPA proposes $1.1M settlement with Vertellus

August 25, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
Chemical-maker Vertellus Specialties Inc. will spend up to $1.1 million and change air-emission monitoring practices at its plant on the southwest side of Indianapolis under a proposed settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
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Dow Agrosciences introduces genetically modified corn seedRestricted Content

July 27, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Even after a string of acquisitions, Dow AgroSciences is a bit player in the seed business. But the new genetically modified corn it developed with St. Louis-based giant Monsanto Co. finally provides the breakthrough product that could grow its seed sales substantially.
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Sunny days could save delayed corn cropRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
Cory Schouten
Hoosier farmers are racing to catch up with their corn plantings after a waterlogged spring.
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Local trust working toward 2,010 acres by end of 2010Restricted Content

May 18, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
The Central Indiana Land Trust anticipates bringing nearly 800 acres valuable to conservation under its protection this year, thanks to a generous tax incentive for property owners.
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Keep Indianapolis Beautiful and Lilly team up on I-70 landscaping projectRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
Some of Indianapolis' main entrances from Interstate 70 are in line for a $2 million makeover.
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Winter farmers market to openRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
A new market called Indy Winter Farmers Market is scheduled to open Nov. 15 at 2442 N. Central Ave. It will be open all winter on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
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FFA benefits cityRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
The FFA brought vitality and $40 million to Indianapolis' economy during its recent convention here.
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Apples, pumpkins, kids keep orchard tour guide hoppingRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Whitney Lee

Ruth Butterfield works as a tour guide at Beasley's Orchard & Gardens three or four days a week every fall, leading an average of two tours a day. Most are school groups, but some adults come with their church groups or on nursing home outings, too.


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Indiana short on honeybeesRestricted Content

June 25, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
A cold snap wiped out at least half of Indiana's honeybee hives over the winter. For some beekeepers, the loss was as high as 80 percent. Fortunately, most don't look to bees for their livelihood.
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Biofuel plans have suppliers stokedRestricted Content

September 18, 2006
Chris O'Malley
Indiana's plan to become the Middle East of biofuels could be a boon well beyond the rural towns that will welcome more than a dozen refineries . Firms that make and supply parts and expertise needed to build the $1.8 billion in ethanol and biodiesel plants--and related infrastructure--are gearing up.
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  1. Of what value is selling alcoholic beverages to State Fair patrons when there are many families with children attending. Is this the message we want to give children attending and participating in the Fair, another venue with alooholic consumption onsite. Is this to promote beer and wine production in the state which are great for the breweries and wineries, but where does this end up 10-15 years from now, lots more drinkers for the alcoholic contents. If these drinks are so important, why not remove the alcohol content and the flavor and drink itself similar to soft drinks would be the novelty, not the alcoholic content and its affects on the drinker. There is no social or material benefit from drinking alcoholic beverages, mostly people want to get slightly or highly drunk.

  2. I did;nt know anyone in Indiana could count- WHY did they NOT SAY just HOW this would be enforced? Because it WON;T! NOW- with that said- BIG BROTHER is ALIVE in this Article-why take any comment if it won't appease YOU PEOPLE- that's NOT American- with EVERYTHING you indicated is NOT said-I can see WHY it say's o Comments- YOU are COMMIES- BIG BROTHER and most likely- voted for Obama!

  3. In Europe there are schools for hairdressing but you don't get a license afterwards but you are required to assist in turkey and Italy its 7 years in japan it's 10 years England 2 so these people who assist know how to do hair their not just anybody and if your an owner and you hire someone with no experience then ur an idiot I've known stylist from different countries with no license but they are professional clean and safe they have no license but they have experience a license doesn't mean anything look at all the bad hairdressers in the world that have fried peoples hair okay but they have a license doesn't make them a professional at their job I think they should get rid of it because stateboard robs stylist and owners and they fine you for the dumbest f***ing things oh ur license isn't displayed 100$ oh ur wearing open toe shoes fine, oh there's ONE HAIR IN UR BRUSH that's a fine it's like really? So I think they need to go or ease up on their regulations because their too strict

  4. Exciting times in Carmel.

  5. Twenty years ago when we moved to Indy I was a stay at home mom and knew not very many people.WIBC was my family and friends for the most part. It was informative, civil, and humerous with Dave the KING. Terri, Jeff, Stever, Big Joe, Matt, Pat and Crumie. I loved them all, and they seemed to love each other. I didn't mind Greg Garrison, but I was not a Rush fan. NOW I can't stand Chicks and all their giggly opinions. Tony Katz is to abrasive that early in the morning(or really any time). I will tune in on Saturday morning for the usual fun and priceless information from Pat and Crumie, mornings it will be 90.1

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