Alternative fuels

Local engineering firm backing effort to turn garbage into ethanolRestricted Content

May 26, 2008
Chris O'Malley
Indianapolis-based engineering and consulting giant RW Armstrong has become lead investor in an upstart ethanol firm that would apply novel technology to make the automotive fuel without using corn as the key ingredient. It would be the first big commercial plant in Indiana to make the alcohol fuel with so-called cellulosic material--the holy grail, of sorts, in the ethanol industry.
More

Clean Wave hopes to invest $100M in alternative energy, sustainable technologiesRestricted Content

May 12, 2008
Chris O'Malley
A former Silicon Valley sales executive and a Cincinnati investment manager have formed a venture fund here that's trying to raise $100 million to invest in the new darlings of the investment world: clean technology firms. Clean Wave Ventures founders Scott Prince and Rick Kieser are banking on soaring energy costs attracting investors to the risky but potentially lucrative realm of alternative energy and transportation and related fields.
More

Road getting bumpy for ethanol plantsRestricted Content

December 10, 2007
Chris O'Malley
The list of potential Hoosier ethanol plants is nothing short of astounding for a state that had just one ethanol-fuel distillery as recently as 2005. Beyond the six ethanol plants now operating and six others under construction, Purdue University agricultural economist Chris Hurt counts 27 others under consideration for Indiana.
More
Page  << 1 2 pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. I took Bruce's comments to highlight a glaring issue when it comes to a state's image, and therefore its overall branding. An example is Michigan vs. Indiana. Michigan has done an excellent job of following through on its branding strategy around "Pure Michigan", even down to the detail of the rest stops. Since a state's branding is often targeted to visitors, it makes sense that rest stops, being that point of first impression, should be significant. It is clear that Indiana doesn't care as much about the impression it gives visitors even though our branding as the Crossroads of America does place importance on travel. Bruce's point is quite logical and accurate.

  2. I appreciated the article. I guess I have become so accustomed to making my "pit stops" at places where I can ALSO get gasoline and something hot to eat, that I hardly even notice public rest stops anymore. That said, I do concur with the rationale that our rest stops (if we are to have them at all) can and should be both fiscally-responsible AND designed to make a positive impression about our state.

  3. I don't know about the rest of you but I only stop at these places for one reason, and it's not to picnic. I move trucks for dealers and have been to rest areas in most all 48 lower states. Some of ours need upgrading no doubt. Many states rest areas are much worse than ours. In the rest area on I-70 just past Richmond truckers have to hike about a quarter of a mile. When I stop I;m generally in a bit of a hurry. Convenience,not beauty, is a primary concern.

  4. Community Hospital is the only system to not have layoffs? That is not true. Because I was one of the people who was laid off from East. And all of the LPN's have been laid off. Just because their layoffs were not announced or done all together does not mean people did not lose their jobs. They cherry-picked people from departments one by one. But you add them all up and it's several hundred. And East has had a dramatic drop I in patient beds from 800 to around 125. I know because I worked there for 30 years.

  5. I have obtained my 6 gallon badge for my donation of A Positive blood. I'm sorry to hear that my donation was nothing but a profit center for the Indiana Blood Center.

ADVERTISEMENT