Anderson

Hoosier Park owner misses $13.4M loan payment

October 29, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Indianapolis-based Centaur LLC, owner of Anderson's Hoosier Park horse track and casino, missed a $13.4 million interest payment due Tuesday on its more than $400 million in outstanding debt, putting the company in default with its lenders.
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Public transportation entities in Indianapolis region might be reorganizedRestricted Content

October 24, 2009
Chris O'Malley
The Central Indiana Regional Transportation Authority, IndyGo and other Indianapolis-area transit groups are the subject of a study that could result in them being reorganized.
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Ivy Tech building new campus in Anderson

October 7, 2009
 IBJ Staff and Associated Press
Ivy Tech Community College will build a $20 million campus along Interstate 69 in Anderson, school and city officials announced Tuesday.
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Indiana hospitals settle Medicare lawsuit

September 30, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Six hospital systems, including three in Indiana, have agreed to pay the federal government $8.3 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit alleging the hospitals deliberately overcharged Medicare for routine back surgeries.
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Anderson firm aims to clean up diesel emissions

September 17, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
Engineer Refaat "Ray" Kammel's Anderson engineering firm has received a $2-million grant from the Indiana Department of Economic Development to start manufacturing a patented device that will help old trucks meet new federal emission standards.
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Anderson siblings buying city's Mounds Mall

September 15, 2009
 IBJ Staff and Associated Press
Two Anderson siblings are buying the city's Mounds Mall from the Florida-based company that has owned it for the past six years.
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Auto supplier set to accelerate with seat-control software

September 4, 2009
Chris O'Malley
A company founded by a Westfield chiropractor is in talks to license to automakers software that’s designed to produce a less-fatiguing ride. Comfort Motion Technologies also wants to make aftermarket versions of the software as add-on modules that could be used in most any car with a power seat.
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Two businesses open at Flagship Enterprise Center

August 29, 2009
 IBJ Staff
The Anderson-based Flagship Enterprise Center is on a roll. In the last two months, the small-business incubator and growth-stage accelerator signed up two new clients: software developers Soveryn Inc. and Coeus Technology.
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Anderson's abundant water supply makes city well-suited for Nestle, other food processorsRestricted Content

June 15, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
The city of Anderson soon will tap a new well to help accommodate demand from Nestle USA, which opened a Madison County plant in May 2008 producing bottled, flavored Nesquik and liquid Coffee-mate, a water-based creamer. The company already has launched an expansion slated for completion in 2011.
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Colts staying at Rose-Hulman for training camp

April 24, 2009
 IBJ Staff and Associated Press
The Indianapolis Colts are staying at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology for training camp. The team has conducted its camp at the Terre Haute school since 1999.
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Law targeting controversial landfill only fuels fight

September 1, 2008
Chris O'Malley
Even for those with a vested interest in the battle over a proposed landfill near Anderson, it's hard to get too worked up over the latest twist before the courts or government agencies. After all, the Mallard Lake Landfill battle is in its 29th year.
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Two central Indiana racinos debut amid tough economyRestricted Content

June 2, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
The next few weeks will be critical for the state's two new racinos, which need to open with a splash to meet their ambitious projections of drawing more than 3 million visitors apiece annually. Hoosier Park in Anderson will open June 2, and Indiana Downs in Shelbyville will follow a week later.
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Racinos may push gambling's limitsRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
During their first half-decade in operation, the state's casino slots machines grew their total sales to $22 billion, according to Indiana Gaming Commission records. But in the last five years, slot sales grew just 18 percent, reaching $25.9 billion in 2006. That's what business textbooks call a maturing market.
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  1. Hiking blocks to an office after fighting traffic is not logical. Having office buildings around the loop, 465 and in cities in surrounding counties is logical. In other words, counties around Indianapolis need office buildings like Keystone, Meridian, Michigan Road/College Park and then no need to go downtown. Financial, legal, professional businesses don't need the downtown when Carmel, Fishers, North Indy are building their own central office buildings close to the professionals. The more Hamilton, Boone county attract professionals, the less downtown is relevant. Highrises have no meaning if they don't have adequate parking for professionals and clients. Great for show, but not exactly downtown Chicago, no lakefront, no river to speak of, and no view from highrises of lake Michigan and the magnificent mile. Indianapolis has no view.

  2. "The car count, THE SERIES, THE RACING, THE RATINGS, THE ATTENDANCE< AND THE MANAGEMENT, EVERY season is sub-par." ______________ You're welcome!

  3. that it actually looked a lot like Sato v Franchitti @Houston. And judging from Dario's marble mouthed presentation providing "color", I'd say that he still suffers from his Dallara inflicted head injury._______Considering that the Formula E cars weren't going that quickly at that exact moment, that was impressive air time. But I guess we shouldn't be surprised, as Dallara is the only car builder that needs an FAA certification for their cars. But flying Dallaras aren't new. Just ask Dan Wheldon.

  4. Does anyone know how and where I can get involved and included?

  5. While the data supporting the success of educating our preschoolers is significant, the method of reaching this age group should be multi-faceted. Getting business involved in support of early childhood education is needed. But the ways for businesses to be involved are not just giving money to programs and services. Corporations and businesses educating their own workforce in the importance of sending a child to kindergarten prepared to learn is an alternative way that needs to be addressed. Helping parents prepare their children for school and be involved is a proven method for success. However, many parents are not sure how to help their children. The public is often led to think that preschool education happens only in schools, daycare, or learning centers but parents and other family members along with pediatricians, librarians, museums, etc. are valuable resources in educating our youngsters. When parents are informed through work lunch hour workshops in educating a young child, website exposure to exceptional teaching ideas that illustrate how to encourage learning for fun, media input, and directed community focus on early childhood that is when a difference will be seen. As a society we all need to look outside the normal paths of educating and reaching preschoolers. It is when methods of involving the most important adult in a child's life - a parent, that real success in educating our future workers will occur. The website www.ifnotyouwho.org is free and illustrates activities that are research-based, easy to follow and fun! Businesses should be encouraging their workers to tackle this issue and this website makes it easy for parents to be involved. The focus of preschool education should be to inspire all the adults in a preschooler's life to be aware of what they can do to prepare a child for their future life. Fortunately we now know best practices to prepare a child for a successful start to school. Is the business community ready to be involved in educating preschoolers when it becomes more than a donation but a challenge to their own workers?

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