Architecture

Duo creating waves in older Indy neighborhoods

July 12, 2014
Cory Schouten
A Realtor and builder are buying north-side homes to be overhauled and sold for big prices, dividing neighbors over the value of gentrification.
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Remodelings might await boomers wanting to stay in their homes

June 14, 2014
Norm Heikens
Many homes will be difficult for aging boomers to navigate without changing doors, bathrooms, hallways and kitchens.
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Indianapolis architectural salvage yards still in the huntRestricted Content

April 19, 2014
Jeff Newman
The recession and lingering uncertain construction market put the shops through a withering shakeout, but several have found ways to thrive.
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BECKER: Indianapolis transit hub will redeem eyesoreRestricted Content

April 19, 2014
Lynn Becker / Special to IBJ
Buses get no respect. Romance clings to the rails and to the grand stations that serve them. When you take a train, you may well find yourself in a replica of a Greek temple or the Baths of Caracalla.
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1960 modern house was built for the age(s)Restricted Content

March 29, 2014
Sam Stall
Restoration evokes marveling over its trappings and construction to withstand the Atomic Age.
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Tower would be first big addition to east side of Indianapolis in decades

October 12, 2013
Jeff Newman
The proposed Market Square Tower—if it’s built as planned at 28 stories and 370 feet—will be one of the 10 tallest buildings in Indianapolis.
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Sales of boomer-owned businesses deemed close at hand

June 8, 2013
Norm Heikens
Several factors have aligned to spark the long-expected trend.
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Architectural gems in IndianapolisRestricted Content

April 20, 2013
These jewels help distinguish some of downtown's best-dressed buildings.
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Architect designs home to grow with his familyRestricted Content

March 23, 2013
Sam Stall
Architect Chris Lake’s Zionsville home is a work in progress, and probably always will be.
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Architects, planners brainstorm Indianapolis transit terminal designRestricted Content

February 23, 2013
Mason King
Here’s what we don’t know: what it will look like, what amenities users can expect, and how it will link to rapid-transit lines still in the planning stages. At the moment, the 1.9-acre parcel is a city-owned parking lot, situated on the south side of Washington Street between Delaware and Alabama streets. But architecture, urban planning and mass transit fans imagine it as an empty canvas, with the potential to showcase a signature structure that triggers more development nearby.
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Three years after opening, Indiana Design Center fillsRestricted Content

February 23, 2013
Norm Heikens
Tenants include interior designers, artists, kitchen cabinet firms.
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HEMPSTEAD: Indianapolis approaching important tipping pointRestricted Content

February 23, 2013
Sarah Hempstead
Confluence of trends, developments offer special opportunity.
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Indianapolis-area landscape architects directory

October 27, 2012
 IBJ Staff
A directory of landscape architects headquartered in the Indianapolis area.
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BROWNE: Finishing touches just now coming to Georgia StreetRestricted Content

October 6, 2012
Bill Browne / Special to IBJ
Time didn't permit final upgrades before Super Bowl crowds descended on stretch.
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ROBERTS: Indianapolis pushing boundaries with improved design

July 14, 2012
Eva Roberts / Special to IBJ
The Cultural Trail points to the possibilities Indianapolis can offer future generations.
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IUPUI Honors College goes from dreary to dazzlingRestricted Content

April 28, 2012
Scott Olson
Renovation of library space creates academic attraction.
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History on the blockRestricted Content

March 24, 2012
This Victorian-era house, which is for sale for $299,000, is considered among the most uniquely designed residences in Woodruff Place.
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Technology helps Ivy Tech marry new, old constructionRestricted Content

February 25, 2012
Scott Olson
3-D scans match former hospital with building plans.
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Pair hopes to find niche in commercial real estateRestricted Content

December 10, 2011
Scott Olson
First project for startup Loftus Robinson Development is a small conversion in Broad Ripple.
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SMITH: Small steps, big results: gauging design's impactRestricted Content

November 26, 2011
Keith Smith / Special to IBJ
Metrics make a difference in health care facilities.
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Indianapolis neighborhood striving for LEED statusRestricted Content

October 22, 2011
Scott Olson
Designation to east-side project would go beyond building certification.
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Indiana architects seek changes to public project biddingRestricted Content

October 8, 2011
Scott Olson
Design-build process is considered to be too costly.
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GM site ripe for manufacturing or a judicial centerRestricted Content

August 27, 2011
Chris Barnett / Special to IBJ
The Urban Land Institute panel’s plan for the General Motors plant site ignores some realities in favor of presenting a relatively predictable New Urbanism redevelopment plan.
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'Expand the smorgasbord' at former GM siteRestricted Content

August 27, 2011
Gordon Hendry / Special to IBJ
Indianapolis has a rich history of turning challenging redevelopment projects into local success stories, and I have no doubt the GM Stamping Plant will become part of that history as officials determine the best uses for the expansive site near downtown.
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SHELLEY: Columbus architecture focus would work in IndianapolisRestricted Content

July 16, 2011
Jason Shelley
Imagine what could happen in Indianapolis if we adopted some of the principles Columbus has? Ensuring that every design has meaning and purpose. Creating structures that tell stories. Allowing designers to push the limits and take risks.
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  1. I am not by any means judging whether this is a good or bad project. It's pretty simple, the developers are not showing a hardship or need for this economic incentive. It is a vacant field, the easiest for development, and the developer already has the money to invest $26 million for construction. If they can afford that, they can afford to pay property taxes just like the rest of the residents do. As well, an average of $15/hour is an absolute joke in terms of economic development. Get in high paying jobs and maybe there's a different story. But that's the problem with this ask, it is speculative and users are just not known.

  2. Shouldn't this be a museum

  3. I don't have a problem with higher taxes, since it is obvious that our city is not adequately funded. And Ballard doesn't want to admit it, but he has increased taxes indirectly by 1) selling assets and spending the money, 2) letting now private entities increase user fees which were previously capped, 3) by spending reserves, and 4) by heavy dependence on TIFs. At the end, these are all indirect tax increases since someone will eventually have to pay for them. It's mathematics. You put property tax caps ("tax cut"), but you don't cut expenditures (justifiably so), so you increase taxes indirectly.

  4. Marijuana is the safest natural drug grown. Addiction is never physical. Marijuana health benefits are far more reaching then synthesized drugs. Abbott, Lilly, and the thousands of others create poisons and label them as medication. There is no current manufactured drug on the market that does not pose immediate and long term threat to the human anatomy. Certainly the potency of marijuana has increased by hybrids and growing techniques. However, Alcohol has been proven to destroy more families, relationships, cause more deaths and injuries in addition to the damage done to the body. Many confrontations such as domestic violence and other crimes can be attributed to alcohol. The criminal activities and injustices that surround marijuana exists because it is illegal in much of the world. If legalized throughout the world you would see a dramatic decrease in such activities and a savings to many countries for legal prosecutions, incarceration etc in regards to marijuana. It indeed can create wealth for the government by collecting taxes, creating jobs, etc.... I personally do not partake. I do hope it is legalized throughout the world.

  5. Build the resevoir. If built this will provide jobs and a reason to visit Anderson. The city needs to do something to differentiate itself from other cities in the area. Kudos to people with vision that are backing this project.

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