Arts/Culture

Arts leaders brainstorm for new funding streamsRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin

A panel convened by IBJ discusses the lack of funding dilemma and need for broad-based support in the Indianapolis arts community.

 

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Grant-makers, stung by market crash, favor safety-net causes, discourage new applicantsRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
Some major foundations in central Indiana are narrowing grantmaking criteria so they can funnel their reduced asset streams toward pressing needs brought on by the recession.
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Library foundation to launch $10,000 prize for HoosiersRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
Indiana has its share of renowned dead writers, but the Indianapolis-Marion County Library Foundation is planning to recognize modern-day Hoosier scribes with a new and quite hefty prize.
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Police museum plannedRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
The not-for-profit Indianapolis Historical and Educational Foundation is planning a police museum in the first floor of an old warehouse along Pennsylvania Street across from Conseco Fieldhouse.
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Theater companies multiply, but audiences don'tRestricted Content

January 19, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
New theaters have popped up in Indianapolis and around the United States in recent years, adding to communities' cultural vitality. But a first-of-its-kind national study reveals a trend that could spell trouble: As theaters multiplied, the overall audience shrank.
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Penrod suspect had past brushes with the lawRestricted Content

January 12, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
As an accounting student at Ball State University, Brandon J. Benker had a thirst for high-stakes gambling. But that didn't keep Benker from landing a job with an Indianapolis accounting firm, or serving as treasurer of The Penrod Society, a local not-for-profit that now alleges he took every penny of the $380,000 in its account.
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Indy-art-loving lawyer pays studio rent for artistsRestricted Content

December 22, 2008
Paul Hunt, a partner with Barnes & Thornburg, recently decided to pay seven months' studio rent for two artists at Harrison Center for the Arts. And the Columbia Club on Monument Circle is looking for new members.
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Economic slump causes ISO leaders to delay capital campaignRestricted Content

December 1, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra's operating loss of $293,000 during the most recent fiscal year is not nearly as troubling in the long term as the symphony's shrinking endowment.
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MacAllister awarded for service to community

November 17, 2008
Sam Stall
P.E. MacAllister has helped turn Indianapolis into a culturally vibrant city.
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Cultural Development Commission may lose millions used to promote Indianapolis artRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
A commission that has drawn $12.5 million in grants and public money to promote Indianapolis' artistic side is awaiting word on its future.
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Arts fund-raising model not embraced locallyRestricted Content

September 8, 2008
Sam Stall

These days, many Indianapolis arts organizations barely know where their next dollar will come from. But an innovative fund-raising model that's found success in other cities might provide that sorely needed cash. In Cincinnati, a venerable not-for-profit called the United Arts Fund, founded in 1927, stages an annual workplace campaign, then doles out the bountiful proceeds to local arts organizations.


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Arts Council ready to play matchmakerRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Leaders of the 20-year-old Arts Council of Indianapolis want to broaden the organization's approach to arts advocacy. They say they'd like to act as a cultural broker of sorts, making sure local artists are connected with possible patrons.
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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