Basiles

Basiles' $500,000 gift to Eiteljorg includes renaming shop

February 17, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
Local philanthropists Frank and Katrina Basile are the first major donors in a $5 million campaign for the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art.
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Bringing New Orleans home to IndianapolisRestricted Content

October 27, 2012
Katie Maurer
Frank and Katrina Basile's Lake Clearwater abode is (almost) filled with art from The Big Easy.
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Basiles back IndyFringe's building acquisitionRestricted Content

July 9, 2011
 IBJ Staff
Gift kicks of $600,000 campaign to renovate, expand theater building.
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Basiles donate to new Wishard Hospital

December 18, 2010
 IBJ Staff
$300,000 from the local philanthropists is the hospital's first naming-rights gift.
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Basiles give big gift to Carmel performing arts center

January 14, 2010
 IBJ Staff
The center will recognize the donation by naming the cafe and gift shop inside the 1,600-seat concert hall after the Basiles.
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United Way calling on well-heeled to dig deepRestricted Content

August 10, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
After so many years of trying to tap every possible cubicle-dweller for donations, United Way of Central Indiana is putting more effort into the richest veins in the workplace—the folks in corner offices.
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More givers asking not-for-profits to meet goals before getting donationsRestricted Content

December 18, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Restricted gifts have long been common among foundations and corporate funders, but now individuals are getting into the act, too. Experts say more donors are attaching conditions to their contributions to encourage the recipient to push itself to achieve.
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  1. President Obama has referred to the ACA as "Obamacare" any number of times; one thing it is not, if you don't qualify for a subsidy, is "affordable".

  2. One important correction, Indiana does not have an ag-gag law, it was soundly defeated, or at least changed. It was stripped of everything to do with undercover pictures and video on farms. There is NO WAY on earth that ag gag laws will survive a constitutional challenge. None. Period. Also, the reason they are trying to keep you out, isn't so we don't show the blatant abuse like slamming pigs heads into the ground, it's show we don't show you the legal stuf... the anal electroctions, the cutting off of genitals without anesthesia, the tail docking, the cutting off of beaks, the baby male chicks getting thrown alive into a grinder, the deplorable conditions, downed animals, animals sitting in their own excrement, the throat slitting, the bolt guns. It is all deplorable behavior that doesn't belong in a civilized society. The meat, dairy and egg industries are running scared right now, which is why they are trying to pass these ridiculous laws. What a losing battle.

  3. Eating there years ago the food was decent, nothing to write home about. Weird thing was Javier tried to pass off the story the way he ended up in Indy was he took a bus he thought was going to Minneapolis. This seems to be the same story from the founder of Acapulco Joe's. Stopped going as I never really did trust him after that or the quality of what being served.

  4. Indianapolis...the city of cricket, chains, crime and call centers!

  5. "In real life, a farmer wants his livestock as happy and health as possible. Such treatment give the best financial return." I have to disagree. What's in the farmer's best interest is to raise as many animals as possible as quickly as possible as cheaply as possible. There is a reason grass-fed beef is more expensive than corn-fed beef: it costs more to raise. Since consumers often want more food for lower prices, the incentive is for farmers to maximize their production while minimizing their costs. Obviously, having very sick or dead animals does not help the farmer, however, so there is a line somewhere. Where that line is drawn is the question.

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