Biomet

Life sciences critical mass elusive in Indiana after years of effortRestricted Content

May 10, 2014
J.K. Wall
Attempts to build the sector are making headway, but Indiana still lags leading states.
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Zimmer shares hit 13-year high on Biomet deal

April 24, 2014
Bloomberg News
The deal will help Zimmer, a maker of artificial hips and knees, take on Johnson & Johnson, the No. 1 manufacturer in the now-growing $45 billion market.
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Biomet plans $40.5 million upgrade, 150 jobs

March 16, 2014
Associated Press
Biomet's project calls for building renovations and adding 3-D printing and optical scanning technology. The Warsaw-based company would also upgrade an incubation center for surgeons interested in introducing a new product, technology or technique.
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Biomet files to sell shares in IPO to pay down debt

March 7, 2014
Bloomberg News
Indiana-based Biomet Group Inc., a closely held maker of orthopedic medical devices, had been publicly traded until 2007 when it was acquired by the group of private equity firms.
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Biomet reaches $50M settlement in hip-replacement case

February 7, 2014
Associated Press
Indiana-based Biomet Inc. has agreed to pay a base rate of $200,000 each to hundreds of people who received artificial hips that were later replaced.
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Biomet gives ortho industry hope

June 18, 2012
J.K. Wall
The skies got a little brighter for the orthopedic industry on Friday after Warsaw-based Biomet Inc. reported strong quarterly sales growth of 3.4 percent. That news sparked a small surge in the stock prices of two other Warsaw-based orthopedics companies.
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Biomet offers to acquire DePuy trauma biz for $280M

April 3, 2012
 IBJ Staff and Bloomberg News
Warsaw-based Biomet, which designs and manufactures orthopedic products for surgical and non-surgical uses, said the deal would greatly expand its sports, extremities and trauma business.
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Device maker Biomet paying $22.7M to settle bribery case

March 26, 2012
Associated Press
Indiana-based Biomet Inc. has agreed to pay $22.7 million to settle U.S. criminal and civil allegations that it bribed government-employed doctors in Argentina, Brazil and China for eight years to win business with hospitals.
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Biomet owners look to arrange $11B marriage

December 15, 2010
J.K. Wall
Warsaw-based Biomet Inc. could get a whole lot bigger if rumors prove true that its owners have made a bid for U.K.-based rival Smith & Nephew plc.
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Biomet sales rise, but slower than expected

October 13, 2010
Associated Press
Biomet's quarterly results are considered an indicator on the state of the orthopedic device industry because it reports results before most of its competitors.
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Biomet investing $26M to expand, create nearly 280 jobs

August 13, 2010
 IBJ Staff
Orthopedics giant Biomet Inc. plans to invest $26 million to grow operations in its hometown of Warsaw, adding 278 jobs by the end of 2012.
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  1. to mention the rest of Molly's experience- she served as Communications Director for the Indianapolis Department of Public Works and also did communications for the state. She's incredibly qualified for this role and has a real love for Indianapolis and Indiana. Best of luck to her!

  2. Shall we not demand the same scrutiny for law schools, med schools, heaven forbid, business schools, etc.? How many law school grads are servers? How many business start ups fail and how many business grads get low paying jobs because there are so few high paying positions available? Why does our legislature continue to demean public schools and give taxpayer dollars to charters and private schools, ($171 million last year), rather than investing in our community schools? We are on a course of disaster regarding our public school attitudes unless we change our thinking in a short time.

  3. I agree with the other reader's comment about the chunky tomato soup. I found myself wanting a breadstick to dip into it. It tasted more like a marinara sauce; I couldn't eat it as a soup. In general, I liked the place... but doubt that I'll frequent it once the novelty wears off.

  4. The Indiana toll road used to have some of the cleanest bathrooms you could find on the road. After the lease they went downhill quickly. While not the grossest you'll see, they hover a bit below average. Am not sure if this is indicative of the entire deal or merely a portion of it. But the goals of anyone taking over the lease will always be at odds. The fewer repairs they make, the more money they earn since they have a virtual monopoly on travel from Cleveland to Chicago. So they only comply to satisfy the rules. It's hard to hand public works over to private enterprise. The incentives are misaligned. In true competition, you'd have multiple roads, each build by different companies motivated to make theirs more attractive. Working to attract customers is very different than working to maximize profit on people who have no choice but to choose your road. Of course, we all know two roads would be even more ridiculous.

  5. The State is in a perfect position. The consortium overpaid for leasing the toll road. Good for the State. The money they paid is being used across the State to upgrade roads and bridges and employ people at at time most of the country is scrambling to fund basic repairs. Good for the State. Indiana taxpayers are no longer subsidizing the toll roads to the tune of millions a year as we had for the last 20 years because the legislature did not have the guts to raise tolls. Good for the State. If the consortium fails, they either find another operator, acceptable to the State, to buy them out or the road gets turned back over to the State and we keep the Billions. Good for the State. Pat Bauer is no longer the Majority or Minority Leader of the House. Good for the State. Anyway you look at this, the State received billions of dollars for an assett the taxpayers were subsidizing, the State does not have to pay to maintain the road for 70 years. I am having trouble seeing the downside.

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