Building Codes

Indianapolis set for sweeping zoning overhaulRestricted Content

September 22, 2012
Cory Schouten
Code dating to 1969 to be updated to encourage density, sustainability and mass transit.
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Developers prefer low-rise apartments in downtown IndianapolisRestricted Content

July 14, 2012
Scott Olson
Building codes add more expense to high-rise projects.
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Decision on Broad Ripple garage delayed again

April 17, 2012
Scott Olson
The two-week continuance granted to remonstrators on Tuesday by the Metropolitan Board of Zoning Appeals follows a previous seven-day delay. The board is set to consider a zoning variance for the $15 million project on May 1.
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City closes downtown plaza after parking deemed unsafe

September 14, 2011
Associated Press
The city of Indianapolis has closed Pan Am Plaza and part of a parking garage below it near the Indiana Convention Center and Lucas Oil Stadium because the structural integrity of the parking facility poses a safety risk.
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Indianapolis halts work on blighted historic building

February 26, 2011
 IBJ Staff
The owner of the 1880 building located at 42 E. Washington St. was cited for doing unapproved work to the facade.
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City push on building codes draws gripesRestricted Content

January 22, 2011
Francesca Jarosz
A vigorous effort by city officials to enforce building-safety codes has some concerned that it’s becoming tougher to revitalize older properties.
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State pushing to keep building-review wait times down

December 16, 2010
Francesca Jarosz
Wait times in the plan-review process for non-residential projects increased dramatically this year, creating a backlog of cases.
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City strengthens building-permit process

October 14, 2009
Scott Olson
The pre-permit review could add nearly three weeks to the current permitting process
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'Dewatering' system creates space, keeps new Marriott's basement dryRestricted Content

September 19, 2009
Scott Olson
A sprawling network of drainage pipes is designed to keep the underground parking garage of the new JW Marriott hotel dry.
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Green bills sprout at StatehouseRestricted Content

January 12, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Legislation filed in the Indiana General Assembly this year seeks renewable energy mandates, stricter building codes throughout Indiana.
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  1. Aaron is my fav!

  2. Let's see... $25M construction cost, they get $7.5M back from federal taxpayers, they're exempt from business property tax and use tax so that's about $2.5M PER YEAR they don't have to pay, permitting fees are cut in half for such projects, IPL will give them $4K under an incentive program, and under IPL's VFIT they'll be selling the power to IPL at 20 cents / kwh, nearly triple what a gas plant gets, about $6M / year for the 150-acre combined farms, and all of which is passed on to IPL customers. No jobs will be created either other than an handful of installers for a few weeks. Now here's the fun part...the panels (from CHINA) only cost about $5M on Alibaba, so where's the rest of the $25M going? Are they marking up the price to drive up the federal rebate? Indy Airport Solar Partners II LLC is owned by local firms Johnson-Melloh Solutions and Telemon Corp. They'll gross $6M / year in triple-rate power revenue, get another $12M next year from taxpayers for this new farm, on top of the $12M they got from taxpayers this year for the first farm, and have only laid out about $10-12M in materials plus installation labor for both farms combined, and $500K / year in annual land lease for both farms (est.). Over 15 years, that's over $70M net profit on a $12M investment, all from our wallets. What a boondoggle. It's time to wise up and give Thorium Energy your serious consideration. See http://energyfromthorium.com to learn more.

  3. Markus, I don't think a $2 Billion dollar surplus qualifies as saying we are out of money. Privatization does work. The government should only do what private industry can't or won't. What is proven is that any time the government tries to do something it costs more, comes in late and usually is lower quality.

  4. Some of the licenses that were added during Daniels' administration, such as requiring waiter/waitresses to be licensed to serve alcohol, are simply a way to generate revenue. At $35/server every 3 years, the state is generating millions of dollars on the backs of people who really need/want to work.

  5. I always giggle when I read comments from people complaining that a market is "too saturated" with one thing or another. What does that even mean? If someone is able to open and sustain a new business, whether you think there is room enough for them or not, more power to them. Personally, I love visiting as many of the new local breweries as possible. You do realize that most of these establishments include a dining component and therefore are pretty similar to restaurants, right? When was the last time I heard someone say "You know, I think we have too many locally owned restaurants"? Um, never...

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