Carmel Performing Arts Center

LOU'S VIEWS: Michael Feinstein shines in book on the brothers Gershwin

November 3, 2012
Lou Harry
For me, the highlights of any Michael Feinstein concert come in between the numbers, when the cabaret and concert star—and artistic director of the Center for the Performing Arts—shares anecdotes and insight about the composer and lyricists who crafted the tunes. His storytelling style translates nicely to the printed page.
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Performing arts center's new chief to chase donationsRestricted Content

June 30, 2012
Dan Human
Tania Castroverde Moskalenko, incoming CEO of The Center for the Performing Arts, turned a $500,000 deficit into a $300,000 surplus at her current organization in Tennessee. The 18-month-old Carmel center’s budget is almost seven times larger.
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Brainard requests more money for Carmel arts center

June 18, 2012
Kathleen McLaughlin
Carmel Mayor James Brainard wants to give the Center for the Performing Arts another $840,000 to cover its bills through December—on top of a $5.5 million subsidy he orchestrated last fall.
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Financial review questions some spending at Carmel arts center

January 17, 2012
Kathleen McLaughlin
A taping of the PBS show "The Sinatra Legacy" was one of the activities the board of directors reviewed after former CEO Steven Libman resigned last summer.
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Feinstein sees growing interest in vocal competitionRestricted Content

January 7, 2012
 IBJ Staff
The Great American Songbook Vocal Academy and Competition will be open to students outside the Midwest this year.
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Carmel's Palladium subsidy multipliesRestricted Content

October 29, 2011
Kathleen McLaughlin
The city of Carmel will subsidize its new performing arts complex to the tune of $5.5 million this year, nearly triple the amount provided last year.
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Palladium not alone in playing up acoustics

January 8, 2011
Kathleen McLaughlin
The new Center for the Performing Arts in Carmel and other arts organizations are promoting the quality of their venues' acoustics, but does the paying public really care?
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DINING: Getting the royal treatment at Thai Castle

January 8, 2011
Andrea Muirragui Davis
Second in a month-long look at restaurants within easy reach of Carmel's new Palladium.
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DINING: Jersey's Cafe satisfies a Jersey boy

January 1, 2011
Lou Harry
First in a month-long series of looks at restaurants not far from the new Palladium in Carmel.
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Performing-arts groups stretch to cover rent at Palladium

December 18, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
Carmel is building a dream home for the performing arts. Now those groups planning to move into it just have to figure out how to pay their share of the mortgage.
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Law firm moving to Carmel City Center

September 10, 2010
Scott Olson
Indianapolis-based Drewry Simmons Vornehm LLP announced Friday it will move 39 employees from Keystone Crossing to a new Carmel headquarters as part of a growth plan that could include a downtown Indianapolis location.
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LOU'S VIEWS: Feinstein more than fine at Great American Songbook Competition

June 12, 2010
Lou Harry
High school vocal competition soared in second year. Winner landed New York gig.
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Carmel performing arts center raises curtain on new name

February 11, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
Carmel's new 1,600-seat concert hall will be called "The Palladium," part of a marketing effort designed to generate more financial support for the city's performing arts center.
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Basiles give big gift to Carmel performing arts center

January 14, 2010
 IBJ Staff
The center will recognize the donation by naming the cafe and gift shop inside the 1,600-seat concert hall after the Basiles.
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Carmel's performing arts center hiring key staff

January 9, 2010
 IBJ Staff
With a year to go before completion of a 1,600-seat concert hall, Executive Director Steven Libman added Jeremy Hatch as development director.
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Financial flexibility drew Civic Theatre to Carmel center

November 19, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
The Indianapolis Civic Theatre could take as long as 20 years to pay the $10 million fee it agreed to as part of a deal to relocate to the state-of-the-art Regional Performing Arts Center in Carmel.
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Civic Theatre confirms plans to relocate to Carmel

November 17, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Indianapolis Civic Theatre will move from the campus of Marian University to the Regional Performing Arts Center under construction in Carmel. The theater and Carmel Redevelopment Commission released a joint statement Tuesday announcing a long-term deal that calls for the Civic to pay $10 million to be the center’s primary occupant.
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Carmel performing arts center betting big on fund raisingRestricted Content

October 3, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
Carmel’s $137 million performing arts center is still a year from completion, but Executive Director Steven Libman already is pounding the pavement for donations.
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Carmel officials confirm Feinstein appointment

September 28, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
Singer Michael Feinstein will make as much as $400,000 in a single year to serve as artistic director of the Regional Performing Arts Center that’s still under construction in Carmel, officials confirmed this morning.
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Civic Theatre considering move to Carmel

September 11, 2009
Kathleen McLaughlin
Indianapolis Civic Theatre, one of the city’s oldest and largest cultural organizations, is considering a move to Carmel’s new performing arts center. Civic informed its current host, Marian University, yesterday of pending negotiations with the Carmel Performing Arts Foundation.
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  1. I am not by any means judging whether this is a good or bad project. It's pretty simple, the developers are not showing a hardship or need for this economic incentive. It is a vacant field, the easiest for development, and the developer already has the money to invest $26 million for construction. If they can afford that, they can afford to pay property taxes just like the rest of the residents do. As well, an average of $15/hour is an absolute joke in terms of economic development. Get in high paying jobs and maybe there's a different story. But that's the problem with this ask, it is speculative and users are just not known.

  2. Shouldn't this be a museum

  3. I don't have a problem with higher taxes, since it is obvious that our city is not adequately funded. And Ballard doesn't want to admit it, but he has increased taxes indirectly by 1) selling assets and spending the money, 2) letting now private entities increase user fees which were previously capped, 3) by spending reserves, and 4) by heavy dependence on TIFs. At the end, these are all indirect tax increases since someone will eventually have to pay for them. It's mathematics. You put property tax caps ("tax cut"), but you don't cut expenditures (justifiably so), so you increase taxes indirectly.

  4. Marijuana is the safest natural drug grown. Addiction is never physical. Marijuana health benefits are far more reaching then synthesized drugs. Abbott, Lilly, and the thousands of others create poisons and label them as medication. There is no current manufactured drug on the market that does not pose immediate and long term threat to the human anatomy. Certainly the potency of marijuana has increased by hybrids and growing techniques. However, Alcohol has been proven to destroy more families, relationships, cause more deaths and injuries in addition to the damage done to the body. Many confrontations such as domestic violence and other crimes can be attributed to alcohol. The criminal activities and injustices that surround marijuana exists because it is illegal in much of the world. If legalized throughout the world you would see a dramatic decrease in such activities and a savings to many countries for legal prosecutions, incarceration etc in regards to marijuana. It indeed can create wealth for the government by collecting taxes, creating jobs, etc.... I personally do not partake. I do hope it is legalized throughout the world.

  5. Build the resevoir. If built this will provide jobs and a reason to visit Anderson. The city needs to do something to differentiate itself from other cities in the area. Kudos to people with vision that are backing this project.

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