Central Canal

Promoters of arts trail recast vision

July 6, 2013
Kathleen McLaughlin
A mural slated for one wall of the Broad Ripple parking garage will be the first new artwork within view of the Central Canal Towpath, which a group of north-side institutions would like to rebrand as the Art2Art trail.
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Potential visitors eye Indianapolis attractionsRestricted Content

November 10, 2012
Anthony Schoettle
Focus groups in Chicago, Louisville and St. Louis reacted strongly to photos of local tourism offerings like the Central Canal and the Artsgarden.
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Flood-control project could mean more trees get ax along Central CanalRestricted Content

August 11, 2012
Chris O'Malley
The latest U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan for a $14.4 million floodwall and levee from Butler University to Kessler Boulevard is both good and bad news for woodland advocates.
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Plan seeks to turn towpath into arts corridorRestricted Content

May 19, 2012
Kathleen McLaughlin
The city of Indianapolis and private-sector players are lining up behind an effort to rebrand the Central Canal Towpath as an art-themed destination dubbed Art 2 Art by adding artwork and improving the trail.
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Canal Walk popular, but full of opportunities missedRestricted Content

April 28, 2012
Cory Schouten
City leaders once envisioned the Canal Walk as a bustling pathway lined with restaurants and shops, but residential and office buildings have sprouted instead on most of the parcels along the meandering 1-1/2-mile stretch--making it more of a local amenity than a visitor attraction.
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Museums struggle to capture foot traffic from busy Central Canal

August 14, 2010
Kathleen McLaughlin
Summer on the Central Canal is like a beachfront boardwalk, teeming with life. People push strollers, hold hands and walk their dogs. There are boats and bikes and Segways for rent. And four museums are steps away from the water. Yet most of them capture few of the passersby.
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MOUNAYAR: Indianapolis should rediscover public spaces

May 8, 2010
Michel Mounayar
Too few of the city's revitalization projects are connected by attractive sidewalks, streets, gardens and plazas.
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Central Canal might get floating stageRestricted Content

May 26, 2008
Jennifer Whitson
A floating stage for concerts and a submarine memorial are in the works for Indianapolis' Central Canal, adding to the downtown waterway's growing base of attractions. Efforts to develop a one-acre site at the heart of the canal, meanwhile, remain stalled.
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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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