Citizens Action Coalition

Utility watchdog: Ending efficiency program 'short-sighted'

June 3, 2014
Associated Press
The leader of Citizens Action Coalition said Indiana lawmakers put the state at a disadvantage when they passed a bill killing an energy-efficiency program that could have helped the state meet the new federal carbon-emission goal by 2030.
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Indiana in natural gas dilemmaRestricted Content

November 16, 2013
Dan Human
'Fracking' has made natural gas cheap and abundant, but prices could rise with demand, costing consumers.
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Duke Energy to retire five Indiana coal-fired plants by 2018

August 30, 2013
Associated Press
A state administrative law judge oversaw the settlement, which was signed Wednesday by Duke Energy, the Sierra Club, Citizens Action Coalition, Valley Watch and Save the Valley.
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Sierra Club puts Harding coal plant in crosshairs

June 1, 2013
The Sierra Club wants the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission to block an IPL plan to spend $511 million on pollution controls at its 39-year-old Harding Street plant, plus a four-unit station in the southwestern Indiana town of Petersburg.
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Regulators snuff $42M Duke Energy proposalRestricted Content

February 2, 2013
Chris O'Malley
Utility wanted to conduct a study to determine how to dispose of carbon dioxide produced by its Edwardsport coal gasification plant.
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Duke foes skeptical about Edwardsport price tagRestricted Content

June 30, 2012
Chris O'Malley
Utility denies claim it is trying to sidestep $2.6 billion cap on costs that can be passed along to ratepayers.
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Consumer group accuses Duke of 'gross mismanagement'

July 15, 2011
Chris O'Malley
"Gross mismanagement" and improper communications with ex-regulatory chairman are among evidence in testimony to make Duke, rather than ratepayers, swallow major cost overruns at Edwardsport power plant.
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Watchdog: State agency heads colluded on gas deal

May 2, 2011
Chris O'Malley
Former Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission chief David Hardy and the state's then-finance director, Jennifer Alvey, improperly discussed the merits of a $6.9 billion contract the Indiana Finance Authority ultimately struck with operators of the Indiana Gasification plant proposed for Rockport, plant opponents alleged Monday.
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Bill would give CO2 pipeline firms right to take private land

January 25, 2010
Chris O'Malley
A consumer group opposing Senate Bill 115 argues the measure is yet another concession to the developer of a coal-to-methane plant proposed in Rockport.
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Renewable power focus of utility reform in 2010 LegislatureRestricted Content

January 2, 2010
Chris O'Malley
The Hoosier Environmental Council and Citizens Action Coalition see an expansion of the state’s “net metering” policy as achievable during the short legislative session that starts Jan. 5.
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Duke Energy wants ratepayers to fund carbon dioxide storage site studyRestricted Content

December 5, 2009
Chris O'Malley
The state’s utility consumer agency is opposing Duke Energy’s request to have customers pay $121 million to study where to inject underground the carbon dioxide to be produced by its Edwardsport plant.
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EPA: IPL electric plant upgrades were deficientRestricted Content

November 28, 2009
Chris O'Malley
Indianapolis Power & Light faces potential fines and capital expenditures after allegedly updating three generating plants over 23 years without adding the most modern pollution controls.
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Bill would let utilities pass on more costs without rate hearingsRestricted Content

February 26, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Utility ratepayer groups say House Bill 1496, which is stuck in committee, is typical of what they see as a disturbing trend: allowing utilities to pass the cost of mandates directly to consumers. HB 1496 would require Indiana's coal-reliant electric utilities to generate at least 10 percent of their power from renewable energy sources like wind and landfill gas.
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  1. to mention the rest of Molly's experience- she served as Communications Director for the Indianapolis Department of Public Works and also did communications for the state. She's incredibly qualified for this role and has a real love for Indianapolis and Indiana. Best of luck to her!

  2. Shall we not demand the same scrutiny for law schools, med schools, heaven forbid, business schools, etc.? How many law school grads are servers? How many business start ups fail and how many business grads get low paying jobs because there are so few high paying positions available? Why does our legislature continue to demean public schools and give taxpayer dollars to charters and private schools, ($171 million last year), rather than investing in our community schools? We are on a course of disaster regarding our public school attitudes unless we change our thinking in a short time.

  3. I agree with the other reader's comment about the chunky tomato soup. I found myself wanting a breadstick to dip into it. It tasted more like a marinara sauce; I couldn't eat it as a soup. In general, I liked the place... but doubt that I'll frequent it once the novelty wears off.

  4. The Indiana toll road used to have some of the cleanest bathrooms you could find on the road. After the lease they went downhill quickly. While not the grossest you'll see, they hover a bit below average. Am not sure if this is indicative of the entire deal or merely a portion of it. But the goals of anyone taking over the lease will always be at odds. The fewer repairs they make, the more money they earn since they have a virtual monopoly on travel from Cleveland to Chicago. So they only comply to satisfy the rules. It's hard to hand public works over to private enterprise. The incentives are misaligned. In true competition, you'd have multiple roads, each build by different companies motivated to make theirs more attractive. Working to attract customers is very different than working to maximize profit on people who have no choice but to choose your road. Of course, we all know two roads would be even more ridiculous.

  5. The State is in a perfect position. The consortium overpaid for leasing the toll road. Good for the State. The money they paid is being used across the State to upgrade roads and bridges and employ people at at time most of the country is scrambling to fund basic repairs. Good for the State. Indiana taxpayers are no longer subsidizing the toll roads to the tune of millions a year as we had for the last 20 years because the legislature did not have the guts to raise tolls. Good for the State. If the consortium fails, they either find another operator, acceptable to the State, to buy them out or the road gets turned back over to the State and we keep the Billions. Good for the State. Pat Bauer is no longer the Majority or Minority Leader of the House. Good for the State. Anyway you look at this, the State received billions of dollars for an assett the taxpayers were subsidizing, the State does not have to pay to maintain the road for 70 years. I am having trouble seeing the downside.

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