Commercialization

Algaeon to take big step after landing $2.75M

May 12, 2014
Dan Human
An Indianapolis-based biotech company plans to use $2.75 million in new funding to begin commercial production of its algae-based nutritional supplements, the firm announced Monday.
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Life sciences critical mass elusive in Indiana after years of effortRestricted Content

May 10, 2014
J.K. Wall
Attempts to build the sector are making headway, but Indiana still lags leading states.
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IU professors' invention tracks eyes to detect brain injuries

January 11, 2014
Anthony Schoettle
Two Indiana University School of Optometry professors are tackling diagnosis of one of the most difficult medical problems facing sports teams at every level: head injuries.
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Funding drought pinches life sciences firms

January 11, 2014
J.K. Wall
Nationally, venture capital investments into life sciences firms totaled $4.9 billion during the first nine months of 2013, down 30 percent from the same period in 2008, according to data from Thomson Reuters and PricewaterhouseCoopers. In Indiana, life sciences firms raised $21 million during the first nine months of the year, far lower than any year since 2003.
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Analysts: Investors wrong to dump Endocyte

October 14, 2013
J.K. Wall
Investors on Friday dumped shares of West Lafayette-based Endocyte Inc. after an independent analysis said an experimental lung cancer drug is unlikely to be declared superior to existing chemotherapy. But two analysts say, to the contrary, the analysis shows the prospects for Endocyte’s drug are as good as ever.
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Research institute tries to succeed where Michigan failed

June 3, 2013
J.K. Wall
While Indiana’s governor, legislature and life sciences executives are united behind the proposed Indiana Biosciences Research Institute, the state of Michigan has a cautionary tale to tell about such an effort.
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IU medical school's push to launch startups bears fruitRestricted Content

April 13, 2013
J.K. Wall
The Indiana University School of Medicine has launched 12 companies in the past 18 months—a burst of startup activity the school has never seen before.
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Pence wants $1.5M a year for life sciences institute

January 21, 2013
J.K. Wall
The Indiana Applied Research Enterprise already has received support from John Lechleiter, CEO of Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Co., as a place for collaboration between academic and industrial scientists.
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VC funds hope to help early-stage life sciences firmsRestricted Content

December 1, 2012
J.K. Wall
Early-stage venture capital has been harder and harder to come by for life sciences companies in recent years, but two Indianapolis investors are working to raise sizable funds to help fill the gap.
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Community to commercialize innovations

November 5, 2012
J.K. Wall
Community Health Network thinks it can help patients, engage doctors and maybe even make some money by trying to turn ideas within its organization into commercial products, service and companies.
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Lilly CEO calls for life sciences research institute

October 23, 2012
J.K. Wall
Eli Lilly CEO John Lechleiter on Tuesday called for creation of a "world-class" research institute in Indianapolis to bring together scientists from universities and corporations to develop new medical therapies and companies.
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Next up for Indiana biotech: Feed the world

August 6, 2012
J.K. Wall
Even though the potential payoff for health care innovation is less certain these days, the business case for new ways to produce more food has never been stronger. That’s the analysis that lies behind BioCrossroads' new report an agricultural innovation.
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Indiana life sciences companies rethink innovationRestricted Content

July 28, 2012
J.K. Wall
Research and development comes under pressure in an age of austerity.
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BioCrossroads has stoked state's life sciences industry, but challenges remainRestricted Content

February 11, 2012
J.K. Wall
In the 10 years BioCrossroads has been promoting life sciences in Indiana, the effort has netted more than 330 new companies, an infusion of more than $330 million in venture capital, a tripling of exports, and a growing number of mentions in national reports on life sciences.
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Purdue hopes center simplifies commercialization

January 30, 2012
J.K. Wall
Purdue University's new Innovation and Commercialization Center is supposed to be a one-stop shop for professors to get help developing their research into products and for outside investors to find out what research is taking place there.
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Inventor on quest to bring medical device to marketRestricted Content

August 13, 2011
Chris O'Malley
Licensed practical nurse Nic Davis invented a device to kill and prevent the introduction of microorganisms that collect at catheter ports.
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Firm joins race with IU autism drug

April 9, 2011
J.K. Wall
The Indiana University School of Medicine has licensed a pediatric psychiatrist's patent on an alcohol-dependency drug that the doctor discovered improves the language and social skills of autism patients. IU has licensed the patent to Indianapolis-based Confluence Pharmaceuticals Inc.
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Wishard gives IT firms in health and life sciences a place to test productsRestricted Content

April 9, 2011
Chris O'Malley
TechPoint-led initiative is meant to help bring inventions to market by giving them a trial in real-world setting.
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Marcadia Biotech principals ponder next course

March 22, 2011
Chris O'Malley
Marcadia execs French, Hawryluk reflect on massive growth of Carmel firm after sale to Roche.
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Ball State seeks leader to implement Innovation Corp. planRestricted Content

March 5, 2011
Chris O'Malley
Ball State University is conducting a nationwide search for a president to lead a not-for-profit it launched to boost the commercialization of the university’s intellectual property.
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Life sciences to drive Purdue's next decade of building

January 26, 2011
J.K. Wall
Over the past 10 years, Purdue University has built Discovery Park into a thriving research and business incubation center, launching more than 30 companies and hosting dozens more. Now Purdue will spend more than $164 million to construct a Life and Health Sciences Quadrangle next to Discovery Park.
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Former IU tech-transfer chief: State isn't competitive enoughRestricted Content

October 30, 2010
Norm Heikens
Mark Long was president of the Indiana University Research & Technology Corp., which was responsible for the university’s tech transfer, before launching a consulting firm, Long Performance Advisors, in 2008.
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IU hits license jackpot; Purdue royalties surgeRestricted Content

September 18, 2010
Chris O'Malley
Indiana University had a license or two to print money from the commercialization of its technology over the last year—and did it ever. While Purdue University didn’t collect as much in royalties from commercialization, it pulled down record levels of research grants.
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Promising ethanol yeast nears market launchRestricted Content

June 19, 2010
Chris O'Malley
A firm that may have developed a breakthrough yeast for ethanol production has landed new investment and high-octane board members. Two-year-old Xylogenics Inc. also says it plans to license its first bioengineered yeast later this year.
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Indiana Seed Fund nearing end of $6 million stashRestricted Content

June 5, 2010
Chris O'Malley
Having invested in 10 companies since 2005 and with its $6 million pot of money running low, the Indiana Seed Fund is nearing a crossroads.
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  1. to mention the rest of Molly's experience- she served as Communications Director for the Indianapolis Department of Public Works and also did communications for the state. She's incredibly qualified for this role and has a real love for Indianapolis and Indiana. Best of luck to her!

  2. Shall we not demand the same scrutiny for law schools, med schools, heaven forbid, business schools, etc.? How many law school grads are servers? How many business start ups fail and how many business grads get low paying jobs because there are so few high paying positions available? Why does our legislature continue to demean public schools and give taxpayer dollars to charters and private schools, ($171 million last year), rather than investing in our community schools? We are on a course of disaster regarding our public school attitudes unless we change our thinking in a short time.

  3. I agree with the other reader's comment about the chunky tomato soup. I found myself wanting a breadstick to dip into it. It tasted more like a marinara sauce; I couldn't eat it as a soup. In general, I liked the place... but doubt that I'll frequent it once the novelty wears off.

  4. The Indiana toll road used to have some of the cleanest bathrooms you could find on the road. After the lease they went downhill quickly. While not the grossest you'll see, they hover a bit below average. Am not sure if this is indicative of the entire deal or merely a portion of it. But the goals of anyone taking over the lease will always be at odds. The fewer repairs they make, the more money they earn since they have a virtual monopoly on travel from Cleveland to Chicago. So they only comply to satisfy the rules. It's hard to hand public works over to private enterprise. The incentives are misaligned. In true competition, you'd have multiple roads, each build by different companies motivated to make theirs more attractive. Working to attract customers is very different than working to maximize profit on people who have no choice but to choose your road. Of course, we all know two roads would be even more ridiculous.

  5. The State is in a perfect position. The consortium overpaid for leasing the toll road. Good for the State. The money they paid is being used across the State to upgrade roads and bridges and employ people at at time most of the country is scrambling to fund basic repairs. Good for the State. Indiana taxpayers are no longer subsidizing the toll roads to the tune of millions a year as we had for the last 20 years because the legislature did not have the guts to raise tolls. Good for the State. If the consortium fails, they either find another operator, acceptable to the State, to buy them out or the road gets turned back over to the State and we keep the Billions. Good for the State. Pat Bauer is no longer the Majority or Minority Leader of the House. Good for the State. Anyway you look at this, the State received billions of dollars for an assett the taxpayers were subsidizing, the State does not have to pay to maintain the road for 70 years. I am having trouble seeing the downside.

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