Community Health Network

Hospitals, doctors finally integrating patient care

September 26, 2009
J.K. Wall
The stitching together of doctors and hospitals—two groups that historically have kept each other at arm’s length—is a trend picking up speed locally and nationally and could accelerate even further if Congress passes health care reform.
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Lennen, Ledyard named hospital presidents

August 21, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Community Health Network has chosen Anthony Lennen as president of Community Hospital South and Dr. Robin Ledyard as president of Community Hospital East, the health care system announced this morning.
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New health center to carry Jane Pauley's name

August 18, 2009
 IBJ Staff
Community Health Network and the Metropolitan School District of Warren Township will open a new community health center inside the Renaissance School, at 30th Street and Post Road in Indianapolis, the two organizations announced today.
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Reimbursement changes prompt specialists to join hospital payrollsRestricted Content

May 11, 2009
J.K. Wall
Specialist physicians, who have traditionally been fiercely independent, are more and more coming on as employees of hospitals.
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New Community CEO weighs in on system's future, universal careRestricted Content

April 6, 2009
J.K. Wall

IBJ reporter J.K. Wall asked Bryan A. Mills about his new job as Community Health Networks next CEO.

 

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Community Health touts integrated computer systemRestricted Content

February 23, 2009
Community Health Network has spent three years developing a computer interface that allows doctors and nurses to view all information and records on a patient in one viewing program.
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Hospitals seek mergers to save costsRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
J.K. Wall
Marion County hospital systems anticipate more mergers, possibly with each other.
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Hospitals suffer from spiking bond interest rates, investment lossesRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
J.K. Wall
Indianapolis-area hospitals have suffered a double whammy of spiking interest rates on their bonds and heavy losses in their investment portfolios and are trying to save cash any way they can.
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Community Health CEO Corley preparing for 'something different'Restricted Content

June 16, 2008
J.K. Wall
This month, 65-year-old Bill Corley gave his 18 months' notice that he will be retiring as CEO of Community Health Network, the third-largest hospital network based in Indianapolis. Perhaps Community's board of directors needed so much time to replace a man who has held his post so long-nearly 25 years. When Corley arrived in 1984, Community consisted of just one hospital on Indianapolis' east side. Today, it has five.
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Clarian buys piece of Indiana Heart HospitalRestricted Content

February 25, 2008
J.K. Wall
Clarian Health has acquired a controlling stake in a cardiology practice based at the Indiana Heart Hospital, which is owned by Clarian competitor Community Health Network.
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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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