Contracting goals

Veteran-owned business push lags goalRestricted Content

November 9, 2013
Dan Human
A city program to help veteran-owned businesses fell short of its goal for its first three years, and it looks like the fourth will be the same.
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Indianapolis to boost businesses owned by disabled

May 2, 2013
 IBJ Staff
The companies could get a greater share of business from city and county contracts under a proposal signed into law Thursday by Mayor Greg Ballard.
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New minority supplier council chief aims to raise agency's profileRestricted Content

July 2, 2011
Scott Olson
Carolyn Mosby brings a wealth of experience to the Indiana Minority Supplier Development Council, which she hopes to lead to the next level of success.
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City still working on mayor's mandate to do more biz with veteransRestricted Content

June 26, 2010
Peter Schnitzler
Mayor Greg Ballard,a former Marine, has made some progress in the two years since he pledged his administration would purchase 3 percent of all city goods and services from veteran-owned businesses, but he remains far from his goal.
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City program benefits veteran-owned businesses

November 11, 2009
Scott Olson
The city's Veteran Business Enterprise program aims to increase the representation of veteran-owned businesses on city projects—an effort that has generated $217,000 in contracts for such firms so far.
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Minority suppliers diversifying into life sciencesRestricted Content

July 6, 2009
Scott Olson
The Indiana Minority Supplier Development Council has made life sciences companies its latest target—part of an even larger effort to attract minorities to the burgeoning life sciences industry under way on a national scale.
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Minority, women contracts rise for Convention Center projectRestricted Content

March 30, 2009
Anthony Schoettle
The hiring of minority- and women-owned businesses to work on the $275 million Indiana Convention Center expansion is far ahead of state requirements and has surpassed rates that were registered for the $715 million Lucas Oil Stadium project.
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Minority-owned contractor Mezzetta Construction downsizes dramaticallyRestricted Content

September 25, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Mezzetta Construction Inc., one of the city's largest minority-owned businesses and a contractor on the Lucas Oil Stadium project, is downsizing its staff and auctioning off its office and construction equipment while struggling with financial difficulties.
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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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