Diversity

Freight Masters files bankruptcy after losing business from Chrysler, BoeingRestricted Content

December 19, 2009
Chris O'Malley
The minority-owned logistics firm is also involved in a legal battle with a Washington state firm over the loss of its Boeing business.
More

Former Huntington National Bank exec alleges age discriminationRestricted Content

November 28, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
Michael Lewis, 53, filed a complaint with the Indianapolis office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Aug. 13 and sued Huntington Oct. 15 in Marion Superior Court.
More

City program benefits veteran-owned businesses

November 11, 2009
Scott Olson
The city's Veteran Business Enterprise program aims to increase the representation of veteran-owned businesses on city projects—an effort that has generated $217,000 in contracts for such firms so far.
More

100 Black Men chapter recognized for serviceRestricted Content

July 6, 2009
 IBJ StaffMore

Minority suppliers diversifying into life sciencesRestricted Content

July 6, 2009
Scott Olson
The Indiana Minority Supplier Development Council has made life sciences companies its latest target—part of an even larger effort to attract minorities to the burgeoning life sciences industry under way on a national scale.
More

Spanish-language news program finds home after cancellationRestricted Content

June 8, 2009
Scott Olson
The familiar face of a local Hispanic television newscast is back on the air, less than six months after the parent of WISH-TV Channel 8 pulled the plug on him.
More

Here's a must-do checklist for personnel managersRestricted Content

May 25, 2009
Tom Phillips
If you are a human resources professional, now is an excellent time for you to assess the human resource function in your company.
More

Eight former employees who say firings were racially motivated agree to $2.75M settlement from LotteryRestricted Content

May 18, 2009
Peter Schnitzler
The Hoosier Lottery has agreed to pay $2.75 million to settle a lawsuit filed by eight black former employees who claim racial discrimination motivated their firing four years ago.
More

Shuel-Walker builds HP Products into distribution giantRestricted Content

April 13, 2009
Katie Maurer
President of the company since 2000, Bridget Shuel-Walker, 42, oversees a distribution operation with $180 million in annual sales and a work force of more than 400, making it the second-largest woman-owned business in Indianapolis.
More

Minority, women contracts rise for Convention Center projectRestricted Content

March 30, 2009
Anthony Schoettle
The hiring of minority- and women-owned businesses to work on the $275 million Indiana Convention Center expansion is far ahead of state requirements and has surpassed rates that were registered for the $715 million Lucas Oil Stadium project.
More

Celebrate contemporary heroes, tooRestricted Content

February 23, 2009
Mickey Maurer
When it comes time to celebrate African-American History month, wouldn't we be better served with profiles of young, living role models we can talk to—heroes who can talk to us? Let me submit for your consideration Mercy Obeime.
More

Some female small-biz owners anticipate boost from changes by new administrationRestricted Content

February 9, 2009
Della Pacheco
Some local women business owners are encouraged by the election of President Barack Obama and his appointment of a new chief at the Small Business Administration who is thought to be especially interested in the needs of women-owned businesses.
More

Ceiling was gone before ObamaRestricted Content

February 2, 2009
It is my wish, Dr. Patterson, that at some point you will realize that American society, warts and all, has provided you with the opportunities that have landed you where you are today.
More

Feeling like a true American, at lastRestricted Content

January 26, 2009
Robert Patterson
I never felt like a true American. Sure, I believe in freedom, democracy, the rule of law and the precepts put forth in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. These are beautifully crafted, heartfelt words and documents hammered out and written by men of truly great intent.
More

Billingsley markets health care mystery shopping businessRestricted Content

December 8, 2008
Della Pacheco
As co-founder and head of sales and marketing, Brooke Billingsley has helped build Indianapolis-based Perception Strategies Inc. — a health care mystery shopping business co-founded by her husband, Kevin.
More

Bloomington wins recognition for being gay-friendlyRestricted Content

November 17, 2008
A national newsmagazine for the gay and lesbian community has named Bloomington as its top U.S. small-town vacation destination.
More

Change begins with everyone, not just ObamaRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Bruce Hetrick
Sen. Barack Obama's election and call for change and hope, as well as Ind. Gov. Mitch Daniels' re-election after dramatic changes, shows that Americans can become successful again.
More

Indiana supports first Democratic president in 44 yearsRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
For the first time in more than 40 years, Indiana helped elect a Democratic president.
More

Schott design firm builds office clients through real estate connectionsRestricted Content

November 10, 2008
Scott Olson
Jenny Schott Androne, the president and founder of Schott Design Inc., one of the city's largest interior design firms, has amassed a diverse array of clients largely by marketing to building managers and landlords, as well as leasing agents and tenants.
More

Almost half of Martin U.'s trustees resign

November 3, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin
Seven Martin University trustees have resigned this year, and at least two say President Algeania Freeman's methods were a factor.
More

Diverse thoughts, backgrounds and experiences make organizations excelRestricted Content

November 3, 2008
Mckenzie Scott
It's the diverse thoughts, backgrounds and experiences people bring that make organizations stand out and excel.
More

Mixing religion, business leads to risks, rewardsRestricted Content

December 11, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Navigating the intersection between creed and commerce can betricky. Fearing lawsuits, many companies prefer to avoid it whenever possible. But others unabashedly intertwine religion and business.
More
Page  << 1 2 3 pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. to mention the rest of Molly's experience- she served as Communications Director for the Indianapolis Department of Public Works and also did communications for the state. She's incredibly qualified for this role and has a real love for Indianapolis and Indiana. Best of luck to her!

  2. Shall we not demand the same scrutiny for law schools, med schools, heaven forbid, business schools, etc.? How many law school grads are servers? How many business start ups fail and how many business grads get low paying jobs because there are so few high paying positions available? Why does our legislature continue to demean public schools and give taxpayer dollars to charters and private schools, ($171 million last year), rather than investing in our community schools? We are on a course of disaster regarding our public school attitudes unless we change our thinking in a short time.

  3. I agree with the other reader's comment about the chunky tomato soup. I found myself wanting a breadstick to dip into it. It tasted more like a marinara sauce; I couldn't eat it as a soup. In general, I liked the place... but doubt that I'll frequent it once the novelty wears off.

  4. The Indiana toll road used to have some of the cleanest bathrooms you could find on the road. After the lease they went downhill quickly. While not the grossest you'll see, they hover a bit below average. Am not sure if this is indicative of the entire deal or merely a portion of it. But the goals of anyone taking over the lease will always be at odds. The fewer repairs they make, the more money they earn since they have a virtual monopoly on travel from Cleveland to Chicago. So they only comply to satisfy the rules. It's hard to hand public works over to private enterprise. The incentives are misaligned. In true competition, you'd have multiple roads, each build by different companies motivated to make theirs more attractive. Working to attract customers is very different than working to maximize profit on people who have no choice but to choose your road. Of course, we all know two roads would be even more ridiculous.

  5. The State is in a perfect position. The consortium overpaid for leasing the toll road. Good for the State. The money they paid is being used across the State to upgrade roads and bridges and employ people at at time most of the country is scrambling to fund basic repairs. Good for the State. Indiana taxpayers are no longer subsidizing the toll roads to the tune of millions a year as we had for the last 20 years because the legislature did not have the guts to raise tolls. Good for the State. If the consortium fails, they either find another operator, acceptable to the State, to buy them out or the road gets turned back over to the State and we keep the Billions. Good for the State. Pat Bauer is no longer the Majority or Minority Leader of the House. Good for the State. Anyway you look at this, the State received billions of dollars for an assett the taxpayers were subsidizing, the State does not have to pay to maintain the road for 70 years. I am having trouble seeing the downside.

ADVERTISEMENT