Economic Analysis

HICKS: Lessons in macabre taxes and ghastly fiscal policyRestricted Content

October 29, 2011
Mike Hicks
Halloween is the time when the Hicks kids learn about taxes. As a loving father, I combine the safety examination of their treats with a lesson on the effect of marginal tax rates on productivity.
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HICKS: Human capital, income inequality and our futureRestricted Content

October 22, 2011
Mike Hicks
Since at least the 1960s, economists have been warning that the link between human capital and economic growth was growing.
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Strategist: Uncertainty still holding back U.S. economy

October 21, 2011
Scott Olson
2012 Augustine forecastIn order to get the U.S. economy to grow at a respectable 3-percent annual rate, the government needs to get a grip on the debt crisis while corporations needs to start spending the money they've stockpiled.
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HICKS: Is the Occupy Indianapolis crowd on to something?Restricted Content

October 15, 2011
Mike Hicks
There’s something in the Occupy Indianapolis protest for most of us to appreciate. Among these is the real and persistent influence from both corporations and unions that distorts our tax system. The reality is astonishing.
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HICKS: Competing theories agree on nation's economic woesRestricted Content

October 8, 2011
Mike Hicks
Both explanations suggest that the large stimulus and enormous government spending deficits are in part to blame for the continued ill performance of the U.S. economy.
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HICKS: Some long-dead economists worth a listenRestricted Content

October 1, 2011
Mike Hicks
It is a bit too early to tell what this recession and recovery will do to the reputation of the many economists who prognosticated through it. But one thing is for certain: It has provided much publicity for many long-dead economists.
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HICKS: Defining and understanding poverty in AmericaRestricted Content

September 24, 2011
Mike Hicks
How much poverty we have and how bad it is remain elusive questions. The causes of poverty are better known.
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HICKS: Efficacy of the American Jobs Act questionableRestricted Content

September 17, 2011
Mike Hicks
In my professional judgment, President Obama’s proposed American Jobs Act is as fair an attempt at stimulating the economy as is now possible. Whether or not it is good policy or will work are other questions.
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HICKS: A solemn reminder of the value of shared sacrificeRestricted Content

September 10, 2011
Mike Hicks
On this anniversary of 9/11, I think we would do well to acknowledge that we have relinquished too little of ourselves in the years since the attacks.
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HICKS: Lessons to glean from Keystone Towers demolitionRestricted Content

September 3, 2011
Mike Hicks
The demolition of a vacant apartment building is common fare in American cities. It is part of the urban renewal that is much needed in many U.S. cities.
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HICKS: High taxes are myth, not America's problemRestricted Content

August 27, 2011
Mike Hicks
In too many places, government does things the private sector does better and cheaper.
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HICKS: Vouchers could help fix what's ailing Indiana schoolsRestricted Content

August 20, 2011
Mike Hicks
The real purpose of vouchers was to add incentives for public schools to improve.
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HICKS: Investors downgrade Standard & Poor's political ployRestricted Content

August 13, 2011
Mike Hicks
There are many reasons to believe the second half of the year will bring a faster-growing economy.
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HICKS: Cuts will come in wake of federal budget dealRestricted Content

August 6, 2011
Mike Hicks
It is clear that the agreement to raise the United States’ debt ceiling demands cuts to military budgets, to entitlements and to the vast cornucopia of discretionary spending.
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HICKS: Woody Guthrie, Ron Paul and the national debtRestricted Content

July 30, 2011
Mike Hicks
Now, I have been given to observe many a wondrous and unusual thing over the course of my life, but the thought of Ron Paul and Woody Guthrie cozying up on fiscal policy leaves me virtually speechless.
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HICKS: Ending subsidies good, but won't solve debtRestricted Content

July 23, 2011
Mike Hicks
We currently have an unsustainable budget, and the inevitable increase in borrowing costs is simply a tax on political cowardice on the matter.
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HICKS: Free trade isn't costing Americans jobsRestricted Content

July 16, 2011
Mike Hicks
I actually find it astonishing that there are still Americans who devote themselves to opposing free trade on the grounds that it hurts the economy. There is no more easily disproven fiction.
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HICKS: Without real cuts, cost of borrowing will riseRestricted Content

July 9, 2011
Mike Hicks
What is abundantly clear is that federal spending is much higher than is currently sustainable.
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HICKS: Founding document holds lessons for todayRestricted Content

July 2, 2011
Mike Hicks
The Declaration of Independence has some key tenets that bear mentioning in these times.
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HICKS: Jobless compensation and the incentive to workRestricted Content

June 25, 2011
Mike Hicks
In essence, the body of research tells us that longish periods of unemployment compensation tend to cause longish periods of unemployment.
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HICKS: Absence of fathers has dire economic impactRestricted Content

June 18, 2011
Mike Hicks
Poverty in America is overwhelmingly caused by two things: failing to graduate from high school and single parenting.
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HICKS: Recession took its toll on under-educatedRestricted Content

June 4, 2011
Mike Hicks
The hard truth is that all the jobs lost in the economy that will return already have. So what will become of those who lost jobs to the recession for which none await them now? The prognosis is none too optimistic.
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HICKS: Remembering those who fought, and whyRestricted Content

May 28, 2011
Mike Hicks
Three times as many Hoosiers perished in the Civil War than the nation as a whole has lost to battle since Vietnam.
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HICKS: Slow recovery doesn’t favor interventionRestricted Content

May 21, 2011
Mike Hicks
Most disagreement over economic policy is not based on theory; rather it is based on the discordant views about the ability of government to quickly and efficiently spend a stimulus or target a tax cut.
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HICKS: Gas prices explained by simple economicsRestricted Content

May 14, 2011
Mike Hicks
Oil prices are affected by the demand for petroleum products, the available supply of oil, the value of the currency in which it is denominated, and uncertainty about future supply or demand.
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  1. I could be wrong, but I don't think Butler views the new dorm as mere replacements for Schwitzer and or Ross.

  2. An increase of only 5% is awesome compared to what most consumers face or used to face before passage of the ACA. Imagine if the Medicaid program had been expanded to the 400k Hoosiers that would be eligible, the savings would have been substantial to the state and other policy holders. The GOP predictions of plan death spirals, astronomical premium hikes and shortages of care are all bunk. Hopefully voters are paying attention. The Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare), where fully implemented, has dramatically reduced the number of uninsured and helped contained the growth in healthcare costs.

  3. So much for competition lowering costs.

  4. As I understand the proposal, Keystone would take on the debt, not the city/CRC. So the $104K would not be used to service the $3.8M bond. Keystone would do that with its share.

  5. Adam C, if anything in Carmel is "packed in like sardines", you'll have to show me where you shop for groceries. Based on 2014 population estimates, Carmel has around 85,000 people spread across about 48 square miles, which puts its density at well below 1800 persons/sq mi, which is well below Indianapolis (already a very low-density city). Noblesville is minimally less dense than Carmel as well. The initiatives over the last few years have taken what was previously a provincial crossroads with no real identity beyond lack of poverty (and the predictably above-average school system) and turned it into a place with a discernible look, feel, and a center. Seriously, if you think Carmel is crowded, couldn't you opt to live in the remaining 95% of Indiana that still has an ultra-low density development pattern? Moreover, if you see Carmel as "over-saturated" have you ever been to Chicago--or just about any city outside of Indiana?

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