Economic Analysis

HICKS: Human capital, income inequality and our futureRestricted Content

October 22, 2011
Mike Hicks
Since at least the 1960s, economists have been warning that the link between human capital and economic growth was growing.
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HICKS: Is the Occupy Indianapolis crowd on to something?Restricted Content

October 15, 2011
Mike Hicks
There’s something in the Occupy Indianapolis protest for most of us to appreciate. Among these is the real and persistent influence from both corporations and unions that distorts our tax system. The reality is astonishing.
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HICKS: Competing theories agree on nation's economic woesRestricted Content

October 8, 2011
Mike Hicks
Both explanations suggest that the large stimulus and enormous government spending deficits are in part to blame for the continued ill performance of the U.S. economy.
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HICKS: Some long-dead economists worth a listenRestricted Content

October 1, 2011
Mike Hicks
It is a bit too early to tell what this recession and recovery will do to the reputation of the many economists who prognosticated through it. But one thing is for certain: It has provided much publicity for many long-dead economists.
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HICKS: Defining and understanding poverty in AmericaRestricted Content

September 24, 2011
Mike Hicks
How much poverty we have and how bad it is remain elusive questions. The causes of poverty are better known.
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HICKS: Efficacy of the American Jobs Act questionableRestricted Content

September 17, 2011
Mike Hicks
In my professional judgment, President Obama’s proposed American Jobs Act is as fair an attempt at stimulating the economy as is now possible. Whether or not it is good policy or will work are other questions.
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HICKS: A solemn reminder of the value of shared sacrificeRestricted Content

September 10, 2011
Mike Hicks
On this anniversary of 9/11, I think we would do well to acknowledge that we have relinquished too little of ourselves in the years since the attacks.
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HICKS: Lessons to glean from Keystone Towers demolitionRestricted Content

September 3, 2011
Mike Hicks
The demolition of a vacant apartment building is common fare in American cities. It is part of the urban renewal that is much needed in many U.S. cities.
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HICKS: High taxes are myth, not America's problemRestricted Content

August 27, 2011
Mike Hicks
In too many places, government does things the private sector does better and cheaper.
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HICKS: Vouchers could help fix what's ailing Indiana schoolsRestricted Content

August 20, 2011
Mike Hicks
The real purpose of vouchers was to add incentives for public schools to improve.
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HICKS: Investors downgrade Standard & Poor's political ployRestricted Content

August 13, 2011
Mike Hicks
There are many reasons to believe the second half of the year will bring a faster-growing economy.
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HICKS: Cuts will come in wake of federal budget dealRestricted Content

August 6, 2011
Mike Hicks
It is clear that the agreement to raise the United States’ debt ceiling demands cuts to military budgets, to entitlements and to the vast cornucopia of discretionary spending.
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HICKS: Woody Guthrie, Ron Paul and the national debtRestricted Content

July 30, 2011
Mike Hicks
Now, I have been given to observe many a wondrous and unusual thing over the course of my life, but the thought of Ron Paul and Woody Guthrie cozying up on fiscal policy leaves me virtually speechless.
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HICKS: Ending subsidies good, but won't solve debtRestricted Content

July 23, 2011
Mike Hicks
We currently have an unsustainable budget, and the inevitable increase in borrowing costs is simply a tax on political cowardice on the matter.
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HICKS: Without real cuts, cost of borrowing will riseRestricted Content

July 9, 2011
Mike Hicks
What is abundantly clear is that federal spending is much higher than is currently sustainable.
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HICKS: Founding document holds lessons for todayRestricted Content

July 2, 2011
Mike Hicks
The Declaration of Independence has some key tenets that bear mentioning in these times.
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HICKS: Jobless compensation and the incentive to workRestricted Content

June 25, 2011
Mike Hicks
In essence, the body of research tells us that longish periods of unemployment compensation tend to cause longish periods of unemployment.
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HICKS: Absence of fathers has dire economic impactRestricted Content

June 18, 2011
Mike Hicks
Poverty in America is overwhelmingly caused by two things: failing to graduate from high school and single parenting.
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HICKS: Indiana an economic anomaly in MidwestRestricted Content

June 11, 2011
Mike Hicks
We Hoosiers are an economic anomaly, an island of growth and resurgent prosperity.
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HICKS: Recession took its toll on under-educatedRestricted Content

June 4, 2011
Mike Hicks
The hard truth is that all the jobs lost in the economy that will return already have. So what will become of those who lost jobs to the recession for which none await them now? The prognosis is none too optimistic.
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HICKS: Remembering those who fought, and whyRestricted Content

May 28, 2011
Mike Hicks
Three times as many Hoosiers perished in the Civil War than the nation as a whole has lost to battle since Vietnam.
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HICKS: Slow recovery doesn’t favor interventionRestricted Content

May 21, 2011
Mike Hicks
Most disagreement over economic policy is not based on theory; rather it is based on the discordant views about the ability of government to quickly and efficiently spend a stimulus or target a tax cut.
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HICKS: Gas prices explained by simple economicsRestricted Content

May 14, 2011
Mike Hicks
Oil prices are affected by the demand for petroleum products, the available supply of oil, the value of the currency in which it is denominated, and uncertainty about future supply or demand.
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HICKS: Motherhood changes, but not in importanceRestricted Content

May 6, 2011
Mike Hicks
The best estimates tell us that about 26 percent of all Americans are mothers, and that the past few decades have seen a big increase in the range of ages of motherhood.
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HICKS: Raising taxes won’t increase federal revenueRestricted Content

April 30, 2011
Mike Hicks
Hauser’s Law, which is really an empirical observation, notes that U.S. income tax revenue has hovered within a percentage point of 19 percent of our total economy for more than 50 years.
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  1. So as I read this the one question that continues to come to me to ask is. Didn't Indiana only have a couple of exchanges for people to opt into which were very high because we really didn't want to expect the plan. So was this study done during that time and if so then I can understand these numbers. I also understand that we have now opened up for more options for hoosiers to choose from. Please correct if I'm wrong and if I'm not why was this not part of the story so that true overview could be taken away and not just parts of it to continue this negative tone against the ACA. I look forward to the clarity.

  2. It's really very simple. All forms of transportation are subsidized. All of them. Your tax money already goes toward every single form of transportation in the state. It is not a bad thing to put tax money toward mass transit. The state spends over 1,000,000,000 (yes billion) on roadway expansions and maintenance every single year. If you want to cry foul over anything cry foul over the overbuilding of highways which only serve people who can afford their own automobile.

  3. So instead of subsidizing a project with a market-driven scope, you suggest we subsidize a project that is way out of line with anything that can be economically sustainable just so we can have a better-looking skyline?

  4. Downtowner, if Cummins isn't getting expedited permitting and tax breaks to "do what they do", then I'd be happy with letting the market decide. But that isn't the case, is it?

  5. Patty, this commuter line provides a way for workers (willing to work lower wages) to get from Marion county to Hamilton county. These people are running your restaurants, hotels, hospitals, and retail stores. I don't see a lot of residents of Carmel working these jobs.

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