Economic Development

What's new is old for Brooks: Former U.S. attorney finding familiar ground in Ivy Tech positionsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Susan Brooks seems to have returned to her roots in her new role with Ivy Tech Community College. The former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana began Oct. 1 leading the post-secondary educational institution's work force and economic development functions, as well as becoming its general counsel. Brooks spent her growing-up years in Fort Wayne watching her father, a high school teacher and football coach, push his students and players on the football field and in the classroom....
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VIEWPOINT: The high cost of traffic Band-AidsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Adam Thies
According to the article titled "Traffic Transformation?" in the Oct. 15 IBJ, the Indiana Department of Transportation is working on a roughly $600 million plan to relieve traffic congestion in the area of interstates 465 and 69. Hold on a second! What is really broken here? I contend little to nothing. Yes, roadways need maintenance and upkeep, but these roadways operate just fine. Because this area is congested at the morning and evening rush hour, the perception exists that these...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Existing work force is our biggest education challengeRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Carol D\'amico
As Hoosiers, every time we open our wallets and pocketbooks, we should think about going back to school. For the last three decades, Indiana's per capita income growth has lagged the rest of the country, to the point where the average Hoosier earns less nized for work force development use a combination of state and local dollars and even lottery funds (as in Georgia). Private management of the Hoosier Lottery, as proposed during the last legislative session, could provide the...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Resurrecting important tax reformsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Morton Marcus
With new mayors and council members in many of our cities, it's time to drag out some previous suggestions for fiscal reform. First, it's time to reconsider propertytax abatement. But we can't understand property taxes and their abatement if we don't understand assessment practices. And, it is not clear what is happening these days with property assessment. For example, does a property's assessed value change automatically when it is sold, or does it change only in line with the trend...
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Commentary: A bibliophile's view of IndianapolisRestricted Content

November 12, 2007
Brian Williams
A public library preserves the record of humanity's intellectual, scientific and artistic achievements, as well as its failures. Those records and the people who facilitate the community's access to them support democracy, encourage economic development, sustain lifelong learning, and foster an information- and technology-literate community. A community's investment in its public library system symbolizes the importance of the civic role of public libraries in ensuring an informed society. In our community, the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library Foundation raised more than...
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West-side group promotes ethnic eateries: Will visitors see gems among strip malls?Restricted Content

November 12, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The Lafayette Square neighborhood is known for its aging mall and the ongoing struggle to keep tenants there and in the surrounding sea of strip centers. But some advocates want to promote a success story: the demographic diversity that has given rise to a plethora of ethnic eateries in the area. Visitors who take a trip through some of the retail centers and outlots off West 38th Street can find the ubiquitous pizza, gyros and sushi-along with more unusual Ethiopian,...
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Commentary: Is receptionist pay vital information?Restricted Content

November 5, 2007
Mickey Maurer
The office was abuzz when I walked in on a Monday morning in late August 2006. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. staff was upset and it didn't take long to find out why. The Indianapolis Star had published their names and salaries as part of a lead story launched from the front page of the Sunday edition. "Is it the solemn civic duty of the Star to let the world know what I make?" our receptionist asked, crying. A member...
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EDITORIAL: Tough love for struggling park: State's high standards deserve praiseRestricted Content

October 29, 2007
Tough love for struggling park State's high standards deserve praise It would be easy for the state's certified technology park initiative to degenerate into a handout program with little or no accountability. If communities in all corners of the state get a park, along with the accompanying tax benefits and grants, everyone's happy, right? Perhaps. But for the Indiana Economic Development Corp. to deploy resources in the most potent manner, it must focus on the parks with the potential to...
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City's life sciences corridor to get $4M in improvementsRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
City planners have long envisioned a high-tech corridor of life sciences research buildings and businesses extending northwest of downtown to 16th Street. And the city is now spending $4 million on infrastructure and streetscape improvements toward that end, as well as signage identifying the area as a life sciences hub.
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Everybody's busy playing the real estate blame gameRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Brian Mann
There's a game that takes place in most families with young children. You may be familiar with it. It's easy. Mom's cherished (insert any household item here) develops a large chip. Mom sees the chip. Mom begins the interrogation: Who did this? "Not me," says Johnny. and Wall Street. After all, they're the ones that loaned the money. It was too easy to get a loan, the critics say. People were buying homes and building developments with high-priced coffee shops...
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Arcadia Resources HQ lured to city by central location:Restricted Content

October 15, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Arcadia Resources Inc. CEO Marvin Richardson, an Anderson native and Purdue University pharmacy graduate, said Indianapolis was chosen for the company's new headquarters because the city's central location will create an advantage when it launches a new drug-packaging system. The system, called DailyMed, will help patients manage their prescription pills. The company plans to open a distribution center for DailyMed in the near future that eventually could employ 300 or more. Arcadia will move from the Detroit suburb of Southfield....
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IEDC ups pressure on Shelbyville's Intelliplex parkRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Shelbyville leaders and residents are grumbling about restrictions the Indiana Economic Development Corp. just slapped on Intelliplex, their $22.8 million certified technology park.
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Commentary: Region is missing benefits of planningRestricted Content

October 8, 2007
Brian Williams
Good urban design can create value for communities, individuals, the economy and the environment. The potential benefits include better public health, greater social equity, enhanced land values, a more vibrant local economy, reduced vehicle emissions and a more sustainable use of non-renewable resources. Central Indiana lacks geographical barriers to growth. Land is abundant and reasonably priced. However, the region lacks a cross-jurisdictional plan to manage growth and maximize the benefits from it. Instead, fields grow corn one season and homes...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Good news about Indiana economyRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Morton Marcus
What do most people concerned with economic development want to see? More jobs at better pay. How can we tell if we are getting there? Simply by looking at what is happening to earnings. Earnings divided by the number of jobs equals average earnings per job. Hence, with elementary school arithmetic, we can say that earnings equals the number of jobs multiplied by the average earning per job, exactly the two indicators of economic development that most folks want to...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Long road ahead for financing transportationRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Mike Hicks
The recent Indiana Logistics Summit framed a number of issues that matter to Hoosiers young and old. I've done a fair amount of transportation and economic development research, but this conference held in Indianapolis was a chance for me to listen and learn. Here's my take on some of the issues: Nationally, a significant piece of the public transportation infrastructure (roads and bridges, for example) has already outlived its anticipated life span. Solid engineering and construction coupled with continual maintenance...
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Capital key topic at forum: Fourth life sciences event grows with local industryRestricted Content

October 1, 2007
Scott Olson
The pulse of Indiana's fledgling life sciences sector will be taken later this month at an annual conference featuring some of the industry's strongest advocates. Experts will weigh in on several topics ranging from the discovery of technology to accessing capital, which is a growing concern for the earliest-stage companies that are riskier investments. In its fourth year, the Indiana Life Sciences Forum will take place Oct. 22-23 at the Westin Indianapolis and will be hosted by Indiana business-development initiative...
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Relocation survey says: 'Go [Mid]west,' young executive: Companies are sending more of their employees to the region; overseas transfers are also on the increaseRestricted Content

September 17, 2007
Scott Olson
Midwestern cities are unlikely to top the list of vacationing hot spots, but they are a popular destination for relocating employees. That's the consensus from the latest Corporate Relocation Survey conducted annually by Evansville-based Atlas World Group, whose largest subsidiary is Atlas Van Lines, the second-largest interstate motor carrier in the United States. The study revealed that nearly a third of firms, 29 percent, are sending more employees to the Midwest than any other part of the country. Surprisingly, the...
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MICKEY MAURER: No gala, but a glorious grand openingRestricted Content

September 10, 2007
In 2006, the Indiana Economic Development Corp. closed almost 200 transactions. Many recipients of the IEDC largess marked the opening of their job-creation activities with hightech galas featuring products rolling down gangways accompanied by the applause of dignitaries and well-wishers. Recognizing that attendance at these ceremonies was not an efficient use of time, the IEDC adopted the mantra, "We don't cut ribbons, we just cut deals." With rare exception, ribbon-cutting was left to the politicians. Last month, I participated in...
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Small biz tax bills rising, too: Extra expense narrows marginsRestricted Content

August 27, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Area homeowners weren't the only ones to get a shock when they opened their 2007 tax bills. Some small-business owners also saw their bills skyrocket-putting a strain on entrepreneurs who often operate on razor-thin margins. "It's catastrophic for some businesses," said Kevin Hughes, state director for the National Federation of Independent Business's Indiana chapter. Mike Hutson, owner of Westfield Lighting Co., certainly feels the pain. The bill on his commercial property-several acres and a 22,500-square-foot building-increased from $42,000 in 2006...
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Power broker Miles calling shots again in cityRestricted Content

August 20, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
In the less than two years since Mark Miles, 53, took over the CEO-driven Central Indiana Corporate Partnership in 2006, he's transformed it into an economic development powerhouse for life sciences, information technology and advanced manufacturing. How so fast? He started networking with Indiana's political heavyweights more than 30 years ago. And he never stopped.
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MICKEY MAURER Commentary: The right men for a tough jobRestricted Content

August 13, 2007
In response to the sticker shock experienced by many Hoosiers upon opening the envelope from the property-tax assessor, Gov. Mitch Daniels announced a number of major moves. He ordered new assessments in Marion County and other counties throughout the state; a tax bill freeze in these counties to the 2006 levy; and the creation of a commission on local government reform, co-chaired by Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Randall Shepard and former Gov. Joe Kernan. The mission of the commission...
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City's relocation from Sherman Park raising concerns: Indianapolis moving departments from blighted areaRestricted Content

August 13, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
When the city of Indianapolis relocates two of its departments later this year from Sherman Park on the near east side to 1200 S. Madison Ave., some say the city is merely trading one blighted area for another-and abandoning a neighborhood it has said it wants to help. And over the 10-year lease with Pillar Investments LLC, owner of the Madison Avenue property, the city will pay nearly $1.2 million more in rent than it would had it stayed at...
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Inventory tax repeal still being hailed as good decision: Amid rising property taxes, economic development officials and brokers say taxing inventory was bad policyRestricted Content

August 13, 2007
Scott Olson
With the state in an uproar over soaring property taxes, some have wondered whether phasing out Indiana's business inventory tax was a good idea. The phase-out process began in 2002 before completely eliminating the inventory tax this year, taking with it roughly $380 million in tax revenue shared annually by local governments. Supporters of the move insist lawmakers made the right decision. And they say Indiana has become more attractive to business as a result. Marion County property-tax bills were...
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Software startup Vyante measures online chatter: Two-man firm lands $200,000 in grants, readies for product launch through beta tests with corporationsRestricted Content

August 6, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
To make money on new software, sometimes you have to give it away. Thanks to that counterintuitive approach, tiny local IT startup Vyante Inc. has persuaded companies like Eli Lilly and Co., Roche Diagnostics, Dow Agro-Sciences and 5MetaCom to test the beta version of its new software, which tracks and measures the impact of their brands online. Vyante hopes eventually to convert the companies into paying customers. "We've persisted against the odds," said Vyante Senior Technologist Benjamin Ranck. "It was...
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Strides taken in life sciences, experts say: Industry panel: Thanks to ongoing efforts, Indiana has experienced serious progress as biomedical hotbed during last 5 yearsRestricted Content

July 23, 2007
Five leaders of Indiana's life sciences industry offered their perspectives at the Indiana Convention Center June 26 as part of the Indianapolis Business Journal's Power Breakfast Series. The panelists: Mike Arpey, managing director of global investment bank Credit Suisse's Asset Management Division and manager of the $73 million Indiana Future Fund for BioCrossroads, the state's life sciences economicdevelopment initiative. Ron Ellis, co-founder, president and CEO of Lafayettebased Endocyte Inc., a biotechnology company focused on the treatment of cancer through receptor-targeted...
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  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

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