Economic Development

Plant left with hazy future: Ex-Visteon factory employs 2,000-for nowRestricted Content

May 29, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
A struggling auto plant on Indianapolis' east side has quietly shed 300 workers in the past year, reducing employment to 2,000, and analysts say it remains vulnerable to closing. If the steering-components plant on English Avenue meets that fate, employment losses would exceed the 1,500 jobs Indiana hopes to win by persuading Honda Motor Co. to build a $400 million plant in the southeastern part of the state. Before last fall, the east-side plant was part of Visteon Corp., a...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Good transportation paves the way for strong economyRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
Patrick Barkey
"Like it or not," noted author Richard Florida opined as he looked out over a crowd that recently gathered in Indianapolis to discuss economic development issues in central Indiana, "you are all part of the greater Chicago region." That might come as news to you who pay taxes, follow sports, or subscribe to a newspaper. But the point is well made. In the larger scheme of things-the so-called Shanghai perspective one would take in looking at our economy from the...
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VIEWPOINT: Illiteracy is a hot economic issueRestricted Content

May 22, 2006
John Mutz
"Is anybody there? Does anybody care? Does anybody see what I see?" So goes the refrain from the musical "1776," when George Washington communicates his frustration with how badly the Revolutionary War is going while the Continental Congress continues to debate the pros and cons of declaring independence from the British crown. Does anybody in Indiana see what I see? I see an economy, slowly recovering, but not booming like the rest of the country. I see state tax collections...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Improving state's economy requires a team approachRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Patrick Barkey
More than 50 years ago, the famous economist Joseph Schumpeter told a simple story that perfectly captured the essence of market capitalism. It's a turn-of-the-century tale of a railroad being built in a part of the country where none had existed. The new investment rapidly upsets the order of everything-once ideally situated towns are left high and dry, while others move up in stature as they exploit newfound advantages. It's messy and it's painful, but the result is for the...
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Battle of the brands: Planners go back to drawing board after city slogan nixedRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Matthew Kish
They thought they had a winner with The New Midwest. They even had the logo-a stylized "I"-all figured out. And a color palette. But then they hit a bump in the road. When Mark Miles became CEO of the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership in January, he joined the big group and said the slogan was a dud. At the least, he said, participants should run it by focus groups. They only had to run it by two before they realized...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Writers require clarity or risk calamityRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Morton Marcus
Last night, I had a dream. I was standing on the ledge of a tall building. People down below were shouting, "Jump!" They were angry because they thought I misrepresented the various and diverse meal-delivery programs in Indiana in my column last week. One woman was yelling, "You're trying to take away my job!" "No," I tried to explain. I was just saying that such programs should be coordinated better and that no oversight agency exists to monitor not-for-profit agencies....
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Daniels seeks to copy key-clusters strategy: Industry initiatives would mimic BioCrossroads planRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, BioCrossroads has been vindicated. Gov. Mitch Daniels hopes to see a series of similar industry initiatives sprout around key clusters in Indiana's economy. He envisions parallel initiatives for manufacturing, transportation and logistics and a series of other crucial business sectors. "We'd love some company," said BioCrossroads CEO David Johnson. As outlined in Daniels' "Accelerating Growth" economic development plan released last month, the initiatives would be based on proven Indiana strengths and identifiable...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Now we have a plan-let's use itRestricted Content

May 15, 2006
For years, Indiana politicians-at least the smart ones-have talked about the importance of economic growth and development, and behind the scenes business leaders have replied, "Duh. How about coming up with some kind of plan?" This was always a hot button for Dave Goodrich, retired real estate executive and former head of Central Indiana Corporate Partnership. In his days at CICP, Goodrich would bend the ear of anyone willing to listen about the need for a plan. Well, how does...
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Daniels' economic development plan calls for pricey tools: Three incentive funds would cost more than $100MRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's days of economic development on the cheap may soon be finished. Three major new business-incentive funds are on the Indiana Economic Development Corp.'s wish list, each bearing a significant price tag. The General Assembly will decide next year whether to provide the more than $100 million IEDC requests to form them. Plans for the three funds are tucked into Gov. Mitch Daniels' comprehensive new state economic development plan, "Accelerating Growth," released April 25. It aims to bring Hoosiers' lagging...
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Biz incubator out of room: IU Emerging Tech Center needs $20M or more for expansionRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
In its quest to develop high-tech startups, Indianapolis has established a healthy pipeline. But there's a bottleneck that's poised to become even more congested. Located at the head of the Central Canal, Indiana University's Emerging Technologies Center is the city's primary business incubator, chock-full of labs and equipment. Established in 2003, the 62,500-square-foot building is now crowded with 26 promising young firms. A handful have outgrown their space, and are on the cusp of "graduation." IUETC CEO Mark Long reports...
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BRIAN WILLIAMS Commentary: Should we invest in ethanol or education?Restricted Content

May 8, 2006
During times of high gasoline prices, the investment made by the Daniels administration in six ethanol plants would seem prudent. The touted benefits of ethanol plants are that they create jobs in rural communities, support Indiana corn growers, improve air quality, and lower dependence on foreign oil. As an Indianapolis resident with little exposure to our farm economy, my first question was, "How do you make ethanol?" Ethanol is made by fermenting and distilling simple sugars like those found in...
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New funds target life sciences: MidPoint concentrates on agricultural technology; Heron aims at broader marketRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Two new locally based venture capital funds believe Indiana is ripe with opportunity for biotech deals. With $20 million under management, Heron Capital LLC is broadly focused on the whole Hoosier life sciences market. Attempting to raise $30 million, the Mid-Point Food & Ag Fund LP has a narrower concentration: high-technology related to farming and nutrition. "We're very excited about our prospects," said Heron Managing Director Greg Maurer. "We have a number of deals in the hopper, some of which...
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First-class parking: Airport freebie list includes former politicians, other VIPsRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Scott Jones could probably afford to buy the 1,800-space parking garage at Indianapolis International Airport, as one who's earned millions of dollars in patent income from voice mail technology he invented. But why buy the garage? The Indianapolis multimillionaire shows up on a list of nearly 400 politicians and other VIPs entitled to free parking at the airport, a review of airport records shows. Begun as a courtesy to a handful of elected officials decades ago, the free parking list...
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IEDC hopes to establish regional venture capital funds: Counties may balk at spending tax money elsewhereRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
It is the kind of business stimulus program that few oppose on paper, but to get the idea off the drawing board, IEDC must convince counties to relinquish their parochialism and ingrained spending habits. That's likely to be tricky. "One of the things we're trying hard to do as a state is to break down county borders where you have infighting, wasted resources and missed opportunities," said IEDC Executive Vice President and General Counsel Nathan Feltman. "We want to make...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: It's time we get started on a new state economyRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Have you ever plunked down a lot of money for something and worried if you made the right choice? You have plenty of company. To cope with that insecurity, some of us try to persuade our friends to follow our footsteps. We put forth convincing arguments why our brand of car, or our new electronic gizmo, is really the best thing, and feel comforted and vindicated when they make the same choice we made. For too many years, that simple...
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Cleveland tech firm going west: Parker Hannifin falls short of employment promises, plans to leave Intech ParkRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Tom Murphy
A Cleveland-based technology giant plans to move its Intech Park operation next month, leaving behind some attractive office space and a broken promise to create jobs. Parker Hannifin Corp. will consolidate its Indianapolis location into a California site, spokesman Jim Cartwright said. It should empty its 30,700-square-foot offices in the park's Intech 10 building by the end of June. The move will have no impact on Parker Hannifin's Tell City production facility, which employs about 100 people who make industrial...
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At age 2, Future Fund still work in progress: So far, 7 startups have received investments from BioCrossroadsRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
For two years now, the $73 million Indiana Future Fund has been at work in the Indiana life sciences market. BioCrossroads, Indiana's public-private life sciences economic development initiative, is pleased with the results so far. "When we put the Indiana Future Fund together and surveyed the landscape, there were only two or three [local venture capital] firms that really identified themselves as in [the life sciences] area," said BioCrossroads President David Johnson. "Now we see much more traffic than we...
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Design standards, fees squeeze local builders: National players go bigger on subdivisions to cut costsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Tammy Lieber
Vinyl siding? Forget it. Rows of homes that differ only in their shade of beige? Don't even think about it. Want to turn a farm road into a neighborhood street? It's going to cost you. Increasingly, that's the refrain being heard by home builders across central Indiana, as cities and towns demand more from developers. Developers agree basic standards are a good thing for a community, but more requirements push up the price of new subdivisions. The result? The big...
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Ivy Tech to focus more on results, not just growth: Student success and broader ties with employers among goals of community college system's five-year planRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Chris O\'malley
After growing its enrollment 75 percent the last decade, Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana is shifting its focus to student retention. A top administrator also wants to expand the number of training courses offered at businesses, as a way to supplement the system's $253 million annual budget. Some who've studied the state's educational system have recommended that Ivy Tech spend more to hire additional full-time faculty to strengthen its effectiveness. The school's five-year student retention plan calls for doubling...
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Real estate experts examine the market: Indianapolis in good shape overall, panelists say, but job growth, incentive issues, among concernsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
On April 14, as part of its Power Breakfast Series, the Indianapolis Business Journal gathered a panel of commercial real estate and construction experts to discuss industry conditions in the local market. In a discussion moderated by IBJ Editor Tom Harton, panelists took on a wide range of issues, including tax incentives and the status of downtown's residential and retail markets. Power Breakfast guests were Mike Curless, executive vice president and principal with Lauth Property Group; Mike Wells, president of...
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Tech acquisitions are bittersweet: Investors win, but state loses headquartersRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
In the past two weeks, central Indiana's two fastest-growing high-tech companies have announced their sales to larger out-of-state firms. Local leaders are of two minds about it. On the one hand, there's the enormous payday for investors. Massachusetts-based Hologic Inc. is buying Indianapolis-based medical-device maker Suros Surgical Systems Inc. for at least $240 million. And St. Louis-based TALX Corp. scooped up Carmelbased Internet testing firm Performance Assessment Network Inc. for $75 million. Optimists hope to see much of that money...
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City gives cultural trail green light: Long-anticipated project could cost $35M to $42MRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
Matthew Kish
The long-discussed trail will loop through downtown and cost $35 million to $42 million. All the money will come from federal transportation dollars and private contributions. "The trail has been officially approved," said Brian Payne, president of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, the project's lead managing partner. "It's definitely a project that's going to happen now." Tourism officials greeted the news with enthusiasm. It's a "huge win for White River State Park as well as the city," said Bob Whitt,...
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Indiana to alter Web site: Small IT firms aren't thrilled with contract requirementsRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
For the first time in more than a decade, Indiana is shopping for a Web portal manager. Indiana Office of Technology CIO Karl Browning is attempting to make the state's award-winning Internet gateway even better. The hunt will also test Gov. Mitch Daniels' "Buy Indiana" initiative, which aims to give local companies a leg up in competition for state contracts. The larger players in Indiana's IT community say they're pleased with the new process. But some smaller firms complain it's...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Short but historic session produces election plot linesRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Ed Feigenbaum
You can go home now (unless you live in Perry Township) and rest somewhat assured that the governor and state lawmakers won't do anything untoward to you until, at the soonest, November. Yes, the 2006 short session of the Indiana General Assembly has run its course, and left the state with some key policy and economic legacies. Not the least of them, as we have discussed at length in this column, and has been covered elsewhere in these pages, are...
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New Rose-Hulman chief a contrast to predecessor: Arizona academic takes reins after Midgley ousterRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
If higher education were a business, graduates would be its core product. Economic development would be a promising second line. New Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology President Gerald Jakubowski wants to make sure he's delivering exactly what the market demands. "At Rose-Hulman, we need to make sure we're meeting the needs of business and industry," Jakubowski said. "For a seamless transition into the work force, students must learn by doing." Jakubowski, 56, could be describing his own path to the president's...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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