Economy

No perfect fit for Main Street: Small-business owners fall on both sides of political lineRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Whitney Lee
Joe the Plumber has been getting plenty of attention in recent weeks, but what about Kimberly the Merchant or John the Manufacturer? For all the talk about whether this year's presidential candidates favor Wall Street or Main Street, there's little discussion of the fact that neither Democrat Barack Obama nor Republican John McCain may be perfect for all small-business owners. Indianapolis manufacturing firm owner John Raine is backing McCain because of his stance on taxes and labor unions. Local shop...
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Flat passenger counts not seen as threat to paying debt on midfield terminalRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Chris O\'malley

The big debt payments on the $1.1 billion midfield terminal at Indianapolis International Airport start coming due in January--just as a recession hits and the battered airline industry cuts capacity. Despite the likely prospect of fewer passengers than projected in the next year or two, airport managers say they don't anticipate problems shouldering the roughly $40 million a year in debt burden over the next 30 years for the new facility.


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For funding, developers may need to think outside box: Amid tight credit markets, getting a project built often takes alternative financing sources, creative approachesRestricted Content

October 27, 2008
Scott Olson
Although the spigot of bank financing has slowed to a trickle, money to fund commercial development projects remains available from alternative sources. Just ask David Amick, executive director of Premier Capital Corp., a local lender that uses federal funds to help finance expansions. "We've got money to lend," he said. "I've got that [message] hung on the door." The fragile credit markets have nearly diminished the ability of companies to borrow. But lenders such as Amick insist the money is...
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INVESTING: Investors' margin calls accelerated selling spreeRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Ken Skarbeck
After a tumultuous and historic couple of weeks, culminating Oct. 10-when stocks dropped 800 points as the market opened-investors stood on the edge of the abyss and stopped selling. Market participants arrived at the conclusion that, over that coming weekend, financial chiefs around the world would do whatever it took to rescue the financial system. And they did, by formulating measures to be undertaken by finance leaders across the globe that are unprecedented and wideranging, from supporting the commercial paper...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Economic crisis explained, at lastRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Morton Marcus
I was uncomfortably challenged when Faye of the Forest landed on my deck a few days ago wanting to know what all these economic goings-on meant. "I'm responsible for teaching the elves," she said, "and I don't know what to tell them." "I don't know what to tell you," I said. "But here's what seems to me has happened." "Some people," I said, "are unable to make the payments on their mortgages. These mortgages are not held by the banks...
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Gubernatorial candidates Daniels, Thompson see economic development differentlyRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jill Long Thompson promises to buoy Indiana's slumping rural counties with a three-tiered incentive plan. Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels has a different vision for stoking the state economy. He wants to build on Indiana's strengths--such as world-class research at universities--to innovate and create jobs.
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Lenders foreclose on at least 20 properties in mortgage schemeRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Cory Schouten

Charter Homes recruited and paid buyers to take out inflated mortgages on dozens of central Indiana homes it built, promising to manage the properties as rentals and make payments for the owners, current and former Charter business partners say.


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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Starting from scratch best hope for health care systemRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Leroy B.
A person's DNA may someday determine how doctors diagnose illness and prescribe affordable treatment. That same genetic makeup also might help doctors determine whether a person suffering from cancer might be predisposed to respond or not respond to chemotherapy or another type of innovative or experimental treatment. That future picture of health care delivery, however, is missing a key piece. It doesn't address what those advancements might mean for health insurance and other related questions about medical coverage. Our current...
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Former rocker rolling along in pizza business: Puccini's founder has 13 locations and countingRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Sam Stall
For much of his adult life, Don Main was a rocker rather than a restaurateur. But fate-along with a pressing need to find a more profitable line of work-drove him to seek his fortune in a kitchen rather than onstage. Main, president and co-owner of Puccini's Smiling Teeth, began his peculiar career change back in 1990, after a decadeand-a-half stint as a professional-but not very well-paid-musician. At age 36, the bassist and lead vocalist for the band The Late Show...
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Entrepreneurs say businesses must act quickly to survive recessionRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Peter Schnitzler
Indiana's most seasoned entrepreneurs aren't standing idly by as the nation slides into what many economists believe will be the deepest recession since the early 1980s.
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Commentary: We're all in danger of motion sicknessRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Mickey Maurer
(Author's note: I submitted this column Oct. 14, with full knowledge that the world may have come to an end by the time it is published.) It's swing time. Candidates for office, state and federal, are swinging and slinging mud at one another. In a last-ditch effort to scare voters, Sarah Palin accused Barack Obama of hanging out with Bill Ayers, co-founder of the Weathermen, a militant group of the 1970s. In reality, by the time Ayers met Obama, his...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: We shouldn't let market mayhem obscure progressRestricted Content

October 20, 2008
Mike Hicks
Amid all this joyless market watching, this much is clear: The financial markets and the economy are going to get worse before they get better. But market watching is never a healthy sport, especially since it tends to make us lose track of the real economy at times like these. Over the past couple of weeks, the real economy has shown a bit of resilience. And here in Indiana, really great news has been lost in the wake of the...
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More small businesses allowed to jump in pools: Law lets employers join together for cheaper ratesRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Scott Olson
Small businesses in Indiana stung by rising health care costs now can band together to broker better deals from insurance providers. The rule from the Indiana Department of Insurance took effect in late August and is the final piece of a 2007 health care expansion state lawmakers financed with a 44-cent increase in the cigarette tax. The pooling program is open to businesses with two to 50 employees and is meant to give them strength in numbers so, in essence,...
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Bumpy road ahead for truck-driving schools?: Slowing freight and federal standards could hurt prospects and raise costsRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Chris O\'malley
With a driver shortage as bad as the freight industry says, one might think operating a truck-driving school would be a license to print money. But proposed federal rules to toughen training standards and, lately, a fishtailing economy could bring a shakeout among schools. There are even rumblings that a few big carriers that contract with driving schools are poised to eliminate tuition reimbursement as they sweat out the economic downturn. "We're going to start losing schools," predicted John Priest,...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: We may be in a recession, but don't expect calamityRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Mike Hicks
It will be some months before we know for sure, but I would wager today that the United States is in a recession. Our unemployment rate is at right about the 50-year average, productivity is up, and living standards never have been higher. Even so, the economy likely has been pushed into recession because uncertainty about credit will dramatically slow hiring and production the next few months. Demand for goods also will be affected. This is financial-market mayhem spreading to...
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EYE ON THE PIE: No numbers equal bad decisionsRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Morton Marcus
"Geez Morton, lighten up," was one of the e-mails that came in this week. I find it difficult to do that while our state and national economies are under such stress. Another correspondent wanted an answer to that persistent question, "Are we better off than we were a year ago? Four years ago?" Here is a small part of that answer: At this writing, there are 5.5 million more jobs in the country than four years ago, an increase averaging...
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Recession takes its toll on charitiesRestricted Content

October 13, 2008
Kathleen McLaughlin

Area not-for-profits are beginning to feel the sting of the year-old credit crunch, which has escalated into a full-blown financial crisis that's battered investors and likely pushed the nation into recession.


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Nervous banks cut off some borrowers, tighten reins on othersRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Cory Schouten

Local companies that rely on credit have seen their borrowing power shrink and in some cases disappear as a deep freeze in the nation's credit markets drives fears of a broad economic slowdown. A handful of businesses, including a Greenwood security firm and an Indianapolis contractor, already have shut down after credit dried up, and others are on the ropes as troubled banks seek to limit their loan exposure.


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BEHIND THE NEWS: Firms with debt in check starting to reap rewardsRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Greg Andrews
Managing the balance sheet. The very phrase is s l e e p - i n d u c i n g . But in times like these, doing it well is what separates the winners from the losers. In the winners' column is Simon Property Group Inc., which finds itself on the offensive as competitors, including Chicago-based General Growth Properties Inc., lean back on their heels. In the losers' column is Emmis Communications Corp., which is saddled with more...
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INVESTING: Advocates did bad job selling rescue packageRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Ken Skarbeck
The word bailout is being used more than the folks at Merriam-Webster ever could have imagined. Yet, bailout is the wrong term to characterize the rescue plan the Federal Reserve and the Treasury presented to Congress. Our leaders have done a poor job explaining why. At present, the U.S. financial system is in cardiac arrest, and this plan is the defibrillator designed to jolt the system back to life. The crux of the problem is that banks and other financial...
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EDITORIAL: Signs of hope as many retreat: Some shrug off economic fearsRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Signs of hope as many retreat Some shrug off economic fears The front page of this week's IBJ tells of companies that are in dire straits-or out of business-after banks, jittery about a financial collapse, called their loans or canceled their credit line. Stories like these put a local face on the economic crisis that has gripped the American psyche in the last two weeks unlike anything since the terrorist attacks of 9/11. Anyone who didn't realize credit's vital role...
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Turmoil thrashes regional banks: As economy weakens, big local players fight to keep capital, customers' confidenceRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Cory Schouten
A rush of government-aided acquisitions has bestowed a too-big-to-fail halo over the likes of JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America and Citigroup. But what about the formidable regional banks that operate more than half the bank branches in the Indianapolis area? How stable are banks like National City, Huntington, Fifth Third, Key, M&I and Regions? Their shares have endured a rough ride on Wall Street, but there's little evidence the ups and downs reflect the true health of the institutions....
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Avoid a royalty mess by reviewing your patent licenseRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Lynn C.
The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Quanta Computer v. LG Electronics left LG stuck in "a royalty mess" that should inspire local businesses to review their patent licenses. More specifically, the decision raises important questions about the extent to which-and the cir cumstances under which-patent owners can collect royalties from more than one party in the distribution chain. Although the case arose out of the IT industry, its lessons could significantly impact Indiana life sciences companies. Collecting downstream In...
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Greenwood company hits it out of the park: Big League Tours tripled its revenue this yearRestricted Content

October 6, 2008
Anthony Schoettle
While most Major League Baseball fans are focused on this year's playoffs, local entrepreneur Glenn Dunlap is already thinking about next year. Dunlap formed Greenwood-based Big League Tours in 2006, offering group trips to big-league baseball games and other related attractions. One such trip took swings through games at Fenway Park in Boston, Yankee Stadium in New York, and the baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Other trips hit fabled ballparks in Chicago, St. Louis, Milwaukee and San Francisco....
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SPORTS: Some stop paying, start playing when money's tightRestricted Content

September 29, 2008
Bill Benner
Goodness knows, I'm not an economist. One look at my checking account would confirm that. So as my wife and I gather in front of the evening news and try to digest the ups and downs of the stock market along with our dinner, we, like most Americans, can only hope and trust (?) that our wiser (?) government and financial leaders will find a way out of the morass. We're luckier than many. Our children are raised and college...
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  1. I had read earlier this spring that Noodles & Co was going to open in the Fishers Marketplace (which is SR 37 and 131st St, not 141st St, just FYI). Any word on that? Also, do you happen to know what is being built in Carmel at Pennsylvania and Old Meridian? May just be an office building but I'm not sure.

  2. I'm sorry, but you are flat out wrong. There are few tracks in the world with the history of IMS and probably NO OTHER as widely known and recognized. I don't care what you think about the stat of Indy Car racing, these are pretty hard things to dispute.

  3. Also wondering if there is an update on the Brockway Pub-Danny Boy restaurant/taproom that was planned for the village as well?

  4. Why does the majority get to trample on the rights of the minority? You do realize that banning gay marriage does not rid the world of gay people, right? They are still going to be around and they are still going to continue to exist. The best way to get it all out of the spotlight? LEGALIZE IT! If gay marriage is legal, they will get to stop trying to push for it and you will get to stop seeing it all over the news. Why do Christians get to decide what is moral?? Why do you get to push your religion on others? How would legalizing gay marriage expose their lifestyle to your children? By the way, their lifestyle is going to continue whether gay marriage is legalized or not. It's been legal in Canada for quite a while now and they seem to be doing just fine. What about actual rules handed down by God? What about not working on Sundays? What about obeying your parents? What about adultery? These are in the 10 Commandments, the most important of God's rules. Yet they are all perfectly legal. What about divorce? Only God is allowed to dissolve a marriage so why don't you work hard to get divorce banned? Why do you get to pick and choose the parts of the Bible you care about?

  5. Look at the bright side. With the new Lowe's call center, that means 1000 jobs at $10 bucks an hour. IMS has to be drooling over all that disposable income. If those employees can save all their extra money after bills, in five years they can go to the race LIVE. Can you say attendance boost?

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