Economy

TAWN PARENT Commentary: Scattered images from abroadRestricted Content

May 8, 2006
We landed in the Marble City, nearly blinded by the light and the white and the reflection of it all. I think of Athens as the Marble City because of its many ruins, but also because of all the other marble buildings and the slippery marble sidewalks and, in our apartment, the marble walls and floors and marble countertops that make so much noise when you set your cup down. We felt compelled to bring some marble home with us....
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New funds target life sciences: MidPoint concentrates on agricultural technology; Heron aims at broader marketRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
Two new locally based venture capital funds believe Indiana is ripe with opportunity for biotech deals. With $20 million under management, Heron Capital LLC is broadly focused on the whole Hoosier life sciences market. Attempting to raise $30 million, the Mid-Point Food & Ag Fund LP has a narrower concentration: high-technology related to farming and nutrition. "We're very excited about our prospects," said Heron Managing Director Greg Maurer. "We have a number of deals in the hopper, some of which...
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BioCrossroads seeks help teaching math and science: Education center to bolster students' careersRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Indiana life sciences initiative BioCrossroads wants to improve the science and math skills of Indiana's elementary and high school students. To figure out how, it's asking the public for ideas. BioCrossroads released a "request for interest in participation" in the creation of a new K-12 Indiana Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education Resource Center. Patterned after the North Carolina Science, Mathematics and Technology Education Center, BioCrossroads' STEM is meant to be a Web-based, largely virtual organization. It would coordinate math...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Mysteries abound in IndianaRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Morton Marcus
There is so much I do not understand about Indiana. After living here for 35 years, after visiting every county and traveling almost every mile of state highway, after making friends with thousands of Hoosiers, I am in the dark on so many issues. Here are three examples: Example 1: What do Mitch Daniels, Arnold Schwarzenegger of California, and Kathleen Blanco of Louisiana have in common? They are all governors who have massive approval deficits. According to Survey USA (and...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: It's time we get started on a new state economyRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Have you ever plunked down a lot of money for something and worried if you made the right choice? You have plenty of company. To cope with that insecurity, some of us try to persuade our friends to follow our footsteps. We put forth convincing arguments why our brand of car, or our new electronic gizmo, is really the best thing, and feel comforted and vindicated when they make the same choice we made. For too many years, that simple...
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At age 2, Future Fund still work in progress: So far, 7 startups have received investments from BioCrossroadsRestricted Content

May 1, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
For two years now, the $73 million Indiana Future Fund has been at work in the Indiana life sciences market. BioCrossroads, Indiana's public-private life sciences economic development initiative, is pleased with the results so far. "When we put the Indiana Future Fund together and surveyed the landscape, there were only two or three [local venture capital] firms that really identified themselves as in [the life sciences] area," said BioCrossroads President David Johnson. "Now we see much more traffic than we...
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Right decision crucial for small firms:Restricted Content

April 24, 2006
Barbara Hassell
Of course, trying to be less subjective does not mean you shouldn't consider "fit" with the organization's culture. In a small company, fit can be critical. One way to attempt to reduce early turnover is to use the "realistic job preview," in which prospective employees are given both the positive and negative aspects of the job, as opposed to the traditional approach of "selling" the firm. If individuals aren't going to enjoy the job, it's better to know it before...
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NOTIONS: Seeking your input on satisfactionRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Dear Reader: For six years, I've filled this weekly space with notions, gnashings, drivel and diatribes. From time to time, some readers have responded-often with nods of agreement, occasionally with headshaking disbelief, once in a while with outraged indignation. Now that we've built something of a virtual community (call it a Neanderthal blog), I want to ask you a question. Yes, I mean you. Please don't assume someone else will answer. And please, don't feel that your insights and opinions...
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Alien hirers rarely busted: Law doesn't force employers to verify that workers are legalRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Chris O\'malley
Despite a high-profile raid against IFCO Systems on April 19, Indianapolis employers have little to fear in hiring undocumented aliens or those who present questionable identification. Rarely do immigration cops bust an Indianapolis-area workplace. Until federal agents led away about 40 allegedly undocumented Mexicans and Guatemalans at the south-side pallet plant this month, the last high-profile raid was more than a decade ago. In 1995, customs officials raided the former Simpson Race Products shoe factory in Speedway, nabbing 66 illegal...
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VIEWPOINT: Latinos and the legal system: no free lunchRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Dave Cook
Many issues face national and local civil and criminal justice systems across our nation. Years and years of application of Band-Aid remedies to complicated and longterm problems have brought many government systems to the verge of collapse. Marion County is no exception to the rule. Courts are strained with overwhelming caseloads. Average lives of cases continue to increase, clogging jails and courts. Public defender and prosecutor caseloads continue to swell, effectively reducing the quality of representation available to both the...
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Ivy Tech to focus more on results, not just growth: Student success and broader ties with employers among goals of community college system's five-year planRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Chris O\'malley
After growing its enrollment 75 percent the last decade, Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana is shifting its focus to student retention. A top administrator also wants to expand the number of training courses offered at businesses, as a way to supplement the system's $253 million annual budget. Some who've studied the state's educational system have recommended that Ivy Tech spend more to hire additional full-time faculty to strengthen its effectiveness. The school's five-year student retention plan calls for doubling...
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Real estate experts examine the market: Indianapolis in good shape overall, panelists say, but job growth, incentive issues, among concernsRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
On April 14, as part of its Power Breakfast Series, the Indianapolis Business Journal gathered a panel of commercial real estate and construction experts to discuss industry conditions in the local market. In a discussion moderated by IBJ Editor Tom Harton, panelists took on a wide range of issues, including tax incentives and the status of downtown's residential and retail markets. Power Breakfast guests were Mike Curless, executive vice president and principal with Lauth Property Group; Mike Wells, president of...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: As construction costs rise, older buildings gain appealRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Brian Mann
Construction costs continue to rise in the wake of hurricanes, tornadoes, the war in Iraq, the building boom in China and general inflation. The trickle-down effect often lands at the feet of small business owners. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' Producer Price Index, prices for materials and construction components increased 0.3 percent in February, following a 1-percent hike in January and continuing a threeyear upswing. The average building cost index has increased about 45 percent since 1995,...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Measuring jobs: How to get handle on how we're doingRestricted Content

April 24, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Getting a good read on the Indiana economy is harder than you might think. That's partly because there really is no such thing as the Indiana economy. State borders are, after all, purely legal contrivances that flows of dollars, workers and goods don't worry much about. We're a collection of regions, in actuality, some centered within our state's borders and some not. But it is the public sector that does the scorekeeping on the economy, and it is public officials...
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Suburban residents slow to jump on vanpool bandwagon: Neither cost nor environmental advantages stir the masses; advocate says 'employers need to get smarter'Restricted Content

April 17, 2006
Chris O\'malley
The federally funded Central Indiana Commuter Services has finally won over a dozen workers to share a van to and from work-somewhat of a feat in a region where a vanpool might as well be a bathing option for a conversion van. Besides a vanpool program that runs between Cloverdale and Indianapolis, CICS recently signed on a handful of Fishers residents to share a seven-passenger van between the Hamilton County town and downtown Indianapolis. Lately, CICS has been trying to...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Diversifying economy requires new mind-setRestricted Content

April 17, 2006
Patrick Barkey
The microwave oven has been a staple in most American kitchens for so long that there is now a generation of young adults who've never lived without them. And for that same generation, the doughy, limp texture of foods like pizza quick-cooked in a microwave, in contrast to the crisped, browned texture produced over a longer time by conventional heat, is associated with the food, not the technology. If you've grown up eating from a microwave, that's the way food's...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: A silent productivity killer: executives with addictionsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
L. Martin
Productivity losses-every business executive looks for ways to avoid them. Yet, an astonishing $40 billion in productivity gains were lost last year due to preventable selfinflicted behavior. This productivity killer typically openly manifests itself on days like Jan. 2, or more recently, on the Monday after the Super Bowl, when an estimated 1.4 million Americans called in sick after a Sunday of intense partying. A big loser? Indiana's economy This major loss in productivity reflects rapidly growing excessive alcohol use...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Election is critical to Gary's futureRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Morton Marcus
Let's sell Fort Wayne and its surrounding counties to Ohio or Michigan. Or in the spirit of the day, at least we could lease out part of northeast Indiana. If we got rid of Fort Wayne (Allen County) and two counties to the north (Steuben and DeKalb) plus one county to the south (Adams) and one to the west (Huntington), we could decrease our state's population by 491,500. Why would we want to do that? There's no good reason to...
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Experts: Businesses should prep for bird flu: Vast majority of U.S. companies have not budgeted for possible pandemic, despite warnings from health officialsRestricted Content

April 10, 2006
Scott Olson
The much-hyped Y2K computer bug came and went without so much as a whimper from a whirring hard drive. But unlike the threat of malfunctioning computers, health experts warn that the potential danger of an avian flu pandemic is far greater. In the event of a widespread outbreak in the United States, companies large and small need to be prepared in order to keep interruptions to a minimum, they say. "I am an evangelist for having a contingency plan," said...
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Tourism's new buzz: Product development: Officials want to build on Indiana's unique assetsRestricted Content

April 3, 2006
Matthew Kish
Billboards in southern Indiana used to tug spelunkers in four different directions. Come to Marengo Caves. Spend an afternoon at Bluespring Caverns. Visit Wyandotte Caves. Don a headlamp at Squire Boone Caverns. Two years ago, however, operators at the four attractions decided it might be a better use of cash to market the area as a single attraction. They pooled their advertising budgets and printed a brochure that listed all four destinations. They also created a passport that visitors could...
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Master planner: Veteran event organizer Smith helps city land major eventsRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Matthew Kish
Maribeth Smith never talks about herself. Despite engineering some of the biggest events in the city's history-everything from Final Fours to the Jazz Fest to last year's meeting of the American Association of Museums-she's loathe to use the word "I." She prefers "we." As in "we" the city. Or "we" Maribeth Smith & Associates, her 14-year-old event planning firm. But as reticent as the 62-yearold Smith might be to take credit for her accomplishments, convention organizers and city officials say...
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Schneider Corp. has designs on big growth in Lawrence: Long-time engineering firm gets boost from state as it plans to make $4.4 million investment, add 140 workersRestricted Content

March 27, 2006
Scott Olson
The voluminous building the Schneider Corp. occupies on the former Fort Benjamin Harrison property was built as a barracks for enlisted men and later converted to a dormitory. So it's fitting that the locally based engineering firm has a vision to create a university-type setting on its nearly fouracre campus where employees can receive training without stepping foot off the property. "We've worked on a strategic plan for the last couple of years, and Schneider University is part of that...
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TechPoint names up-and-coming Mira nominees: Annual award celebrates excellence in innovationRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Peter Schnitzler
TechPoint won't distribute its annual Mira awards until its banquet at the Indiana Roof Ballroom May 19. But the state's largest high-tech trade association has completed the nomination process for its top awards, pulling together a list of 49 innovative companies and educators in such categories as information technology, life sciences and advanced manufacturing. About 750 people usually attend the Mira banquet. But the awards are meant to reverberate among a far wider population all year long as confirmation which...
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BULLS & BEARS: Stop-loss orders might cost you in long runRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Dave Gilreath
Every fortnight, my firm sends out a newsletter to clients, prospects and friends. In it, we opine on the stock market, the economy, pop culture and politics. If you read this column, you have a general idea of the tone of the letters. This week, we got "fan mail" from neither a client nor a friend, but from a gentleman we had presented our services to about 18 months ago. He started his letter stating he found our writings "informative,...
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Hospitality madness: City wants to grow reputation as Final Four's ideal siteRestricted Content

March 20, 2006
Matthew Kish
Bill Evans' phone rang at 11 p.m. It was a basketball team. The players wanted milkshakes. He popped up like he was bouncing on one of those mini-trampolines mascots use to dunk basketballs at halftime. He tapped his partner on the shoulder. They rolled two coolers to the downtown Steak n Shake. He ordered milkshakes. Large ones. Two for each player. They put the shakes in the coolers and rolled them through the downtown night to the team hotel. The...
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  1. If what you stated is true, then this article is entirely inaccurate. "State sells bonds" is same as "State borrows money". Supposedly the company will "pay for them". But since we are paying the company, we are still paying for this road with borrowed money, even though the state has $2 billion in the bank.

  2. Andrew hit the nail on the head. AMTRAK provides terrible service and that is why the state has found a contractor to improve the service. More trips, on-time performance, better times, cleanliness and adequate or better restrooms. WI-FI and food service will also be provided. Transit from outlying areas will also be provided. I wouldn't take it the way it is but with the above services and marketing of the service,ridership will improve and more folks will explore Indy and may even want to move here.

  3. They could take the property using eminent domain and save money by not paying the church or building a soccer field and a new driveway. Ctrwd has monthly meetings open to all customers of the district. The meetings are listed and if the customers really cared that much they would show. Ctrwd works hard in every way they can to make sure the customer is put first. Overflows damage the surrounding environment and cost a lot of money every year. There have been many upgrades done through the years to help not send flow to Carmel. Even with the upgrades ctrwd cannot always keep up. I understand how a storage tank could be an eye sore, but has anyone thought to look at other lift stations or storage tanks. Most lift stations are right in the middle of neighborhoods. Some close to schools and soccer fields, and some right in back yards, or at least next to a back yard. We all have to work together to come up with a proper solution. The proposed solution by ctrwd is the best one offered so far.

  4. Fox has comments from several people that seem to have some inside information. I would refer to their website. Changed my whole opionion of this story.

  5. This place is great! I'm piggy backing and saying the Cobb salad is great. But the ribs are awesome. $6.49 for ribs and 2 sides?! They're delicious. If you work downtown, head over there.

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