Education & Workforce Development

Retailers hope to buck holiday predictions: Optimism found in online sales, busy Black FridayRestricted Content

December 3, 2007
Scott Olson
High oil prices and a continuing credit crunch have many retailers bracing for a blue Christmas. Holiday sales this year are expected to grow a modest 4 percent, according to some retail experts, which would be the weakest pace in five years. The ominous forecasts prompted retailers to unveil promotions in October, although the official start of the shopping season was the day after Thanksgiving, traditionally known as "Black Friday." Stores likely will rely upon a variety of incentives to...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Reforms could create barriers to homeownershipRestricted Content

November 26, 2007
Mike Hicks
Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. Maybe it is because no one wants me to help cook, or perhaps it's due to the stream of college football. Mostly I think I like it because it is such an unhurried, fun, shared day. This year, many of us gathered for Thanksgiving at family homes and we gave thanks for the many gifts life brings us in this nation. What many of us didn't conscientiously dwell on is how important the simple act...
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New seminar, gallery space opening in the Stutz: Move will create gathering place, could help artists teaching classes hang onto more of tuitionRestricted Content

November 26, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The sprawling Stutz Business Center downtown already is a haven of sorts for the 72 artists who have studios there. Beginning in January, it also will have a space they can use to teach, mingle and show their work. It's the brainchild of Stutz Artists Association President Jerry Points, who envisioned a first-floor gathering place for the diverse group of painters, sculptors, photographers and others who toil within the labyrinthine building. "Most [artists] will go to their studio, close the...
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'BUILD YOUR BUSINESS by investing in it':Restricted Content

November 26, 2007
-Andrea Muirragui
Creative Street Media Group has come a long way-literally and figuratively-from its humble beginnings 23 years ago. The small video production company has become a corporate conglomerate, with 67 employees in five facilities who handle everything from promotional materials to interactive education. Oh yeah, and they also crank out some award-winning TV shows-like the Emmy Award-winning "Vietnam Nurses with Dana Delany." For all its progress, Creative Street is not done growing. Any day now, the company will expand its reach...
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What's new is old for Brooks: Former U.S. attorney finding familiar ground in Ivy Tech positionsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Susan Brooks seems to have returned to her roots in her new role with Ivy Tech Community College. The former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana began Oct. 1 leading the post-secondary educational institution's work force and economic development functions, as well as becoming its general counsel. Brooks spent her growing-up years in Fort Wayne watching her father, a high school teacher and football coach, push his students and players on the football field and in the classroom....
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Leader program builds following: Center for Leadership Excellence set to welcome third class of execsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Scott Olson
Ten times a year, for 24 hours, a select group of executives leaves the comforts of career to embark on an experience meant to mold the participants into better leaders. They gather on Thursday evenings for dinner, bunk overnight at a hotel, and spend the following day listening to the likes of Dennis Perkins, author of "Leading at the Edge: Leadership Lessons from the Extraordinary Saga of Shackleton's Antarctic Expedition." Or, they may travel to Saint Meinrad in southern Indiana...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Existing work force is our biggest education challengeRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Carol D\'amico
As Hoosiers, every time we open our wallets and pocketbooks, we should think about going back to school. For the last three decades, Indiana's per capita income growth has lagged the rest of the country, to the point where the average Hoosier earns less nized for work force development use a combination of state and local dollars and even lottery funds (as in Georgia). Private management of the Hoosier Lottery, as proposed during the last legislative session, could provide the...
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Health care top choice in career poll: Student interest in technology jobs holds steady, state survey findsRestricted Content

November 19, 2007
Scott Olson
Recent results from an annual survey show health services remains the most popular career choice among Indiana high-school juniors planning to go to college. The questionnaire was administered by Learn More Indiana, an effort to promote college and career planning supported by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, as well as a few other state agencies. Learn More Indiana has existed for about 20 years, but had been known as the Indiana College Admissions and Placement Center before the arrival...
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Bariatric product key for software firm's growth: Former WellPoint execs heading up young companyRestricted Content

November 12, 2007
J.K. Wall
Medical Animatics LLC hopes its latest product helps double its size while helping patients shrink theirs. The small Indianapolis firm plans to roll out bariatric-education software by yearend. By tapping the popular surgery procedure, Medical Animatics' officers hope that product grows sales enough to double its nine-person work force in a year. The new product launch is the first major initiative for Medical Animatics since it secured angel investments from two former WellPoint Inc. officers earlier this year. Jane Niederberger...
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Commentary: A bibliophile's view of IndianapolisRestricted Content

November 12, 2007
Brian Williams
A public library preserves the record of humanity's intellectual, scientific and artistic achievements, as well as its failures. Those records and the people who facilitate the community's access to them support democracy, encourage economic development, sustain lifelong learning, and foster an information- and technology-literate community. A community's investment in its public library system symbolizes the importance of the civic role of public libraries in ensuring an informed society. In our community, the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library Foundation raised more than...
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Measured strides in science: Engineering, science still male dominatedRestricted Content

November 12, 2007
Cynthia Sequin
When the 2007 Nobel Prize winners in science were announced in October, it didn't take a mathematical wizard to calculate the number of women who won the eminent prize in the field of science. Zero. Women and men might wonder: was the shutout because of gender discrimination or innate ability? "No one wants to be a sexist, but whether we like it or not we make assessments based on all kinds of factors, including gender," said Carol McCord, assistant dean...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: World War II veterans built economy into juggernautRestricted Content

November 12, 2007
Mike Hicks
Veterans Day is upon us again, and the slow passing of the World War II generation sparks thought on their contributions. I will let others dwell on their considerable wartime achievements. I am an economist, not a historian, after all. Our 16 million World War II veterans emerged from conflict in the late summer of 1945 to a muchfractured world. The production of goods-where facilities had survived bombs and artillery-was almost wholly focused on the demands of war. A worldwide...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Children are central issue for '08Restricted Content

November 12, 2007
Morton Marcus
The election campaign of 2008 can transform our state if the candidates focus their attention on children. We can develop a healthy economy and become a model of civility if we focus systematically on our children. Many people are convinced government spends too much. What they mean is that government spends for services that don't benefit them or services they wish they did not need. Who wants to spend money on juvenile corrections or adult reading programs for prisoners? Who...
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Fast-growing WDG built on years of industry experience: Veteran of Kite, Lauth branches out on his ownRestricted Content

November 5, 2007
Scott Olson
For Mike Wyman, a devastating fire that gutted the family home during his teen-age years laid the foundation for a rewarding career in construction. The 41-year-old Wyman climbed from carpenter to become a leader of projects at two of the city's largest commercial developers before launching his own company in 2005. WDG Construction & Development Services Inc. on East Washington Street downtown has since grown into a firm that expects to top $30 million in revenue next year-double this year's...
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Commentary: To the victor go the schools?Restricted Content

November 5, 2007
Abdul-Hakim Shabazz
I have no idea who will get the job of mayor of Indianapolis come Nov. 7. But whoever it is can make a real difference in this town by tackling its most pressing issue: public schools. Good schools are the lifeblood of any community. They increase property values, lower crime and make your municipality more attractive to companies looking to relocate. Marion County schools haven't had the best track records. Whether it's Indianapolis Public Schools and its academic performance, Washington...
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Design Build Institute hoping to spur flood of projects:Restricted Content

November 5, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Public entities, like school districts and universities, are not known for being risk takers. Some even call them "risk averse." So, those in the architectural and construction industries aren't surprised that a state law passed two years ago allowing public entities to use the design-build process is only now taking hold. Design-build lets the owner hire one team to carry out both the design and construction of a project-unlike the traditional design-bid-build process in which the owner commissions architectural plans,...
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Financial education on a roll: Money Bus travels state to make children smarter about financesRestricted Content

October 29, 2007
Katie Maurer
Teaching kids about finances used to be as simple as giving them lunch money. With credit card debt and bankruptcy rates soaring among young adults, however, there's a new push nationwide to help kids get smart about money. Experts say even kindergartners aren't too young to learn the ins and outs of spending, saving, borrowing and budgeting. One local program is hoping to do all that in a fun, informative setting. The Money Bus, a sort of traveling classroom, visits...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Time for a little schooling on income inequalityRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Mike Hicks
A reader in South Bend recently argued that attention to growing wage inequality in the country should be part of these economic discussions. He is right-and given the proximity of the presidential election, we are all going to hear plenty about it. Here's a bit of economic analysis of the situation. By itself, income data can tell a misleading story. The United States enjoys significant income variability over an individual's life cycle. So, a snapshot across one year tells us...
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White-collar crime has a new watchdog: Indiana securities commissioner aims to educate investors, enforce lawRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Madison native Chris Naylor on Oct. 5 became Indiana's securities commissioner. He was appointed by Indiana Secretary of State Todd Rokita to succeed O. Wayne Davis, who now is a semi-retired legal consultant. Naylor, former county prosecutor in two southern Indiana counties, sat down with IBJ to talk about his goals as the state's top securities cop. The following is an edited version of that interview. IBJ: What's your office's focus? NAYLOR: There are two large areas: investor protection and...
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VIEWPOINT: Reform won't require constitutional rewriteRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Jon Laramore
In July, when Gov. Mitch Daniels appointed the Commission on Local Government Reform to search for ways to streamline and modernize Indiana's system of local government, he recommended considering every option for bringing government into the 21st century. And he raised one particularly dramatic option: convening a convention to rewrite Indiana's constitution, a document that has been amended often, but never rewritten, in 156 years. Times were different in 1851, when Indiana enacted its constitution. The state had fewer than...
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Washington Township tests anti-tax moodRestricted Content

October 22, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
A north-side Marion County school district is reigniting the property-tax furor by rolling out a plan to spend as much as $200 million on renovations and new construction. Washington Township is the first school district in the county to unveil major capital projects since residents howled in protest last summer against property-tax increases that averaged 35 percent.
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New leader aims to keep school, students growing: More businesses support private north-side institutionRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
What began in 1994 as a six-room schoolhouse with 38 students has grown into a three-building campus with 602 pupils. The growth of the International School of Indiana, which welcomed a new headmaster this year, has been possible because of increased support from an expanding flock of businesses. They believe in its mission: to help attract scientists and executives from around the world to this community by providing a global education for their children. Before the school opened, recalled Eli...
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IU business incubator partners with Siberian school: Reciprocal visits could lead to high-tech opportunitiesRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
After unwrapping his luggage from its seal of shrink-wrap, Mark Long reviewed his notes for the upcoming seminar. He hardly needed them. Long, CEO of Indiana University's Research and Technology Corp., has spoken many times about how academics transfer their research discoveries to the market. But this was the first time he ever delivered the speech in Siberia. The audience-a group of business and academic leaders-ultimately could help Hoosiers access a treasure-trove of Russian technologies. "They have a lot of...
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Experts look into the future of health care: Industry panelists disagree on whether current system needs radical changesRestricted Content

October 15, 2007
Five local industry leaders conducted a serious debate over problems and issues facing our health care system during the most recent installment in Indianapolis Business Journal's Power Breakfast series. The event took place at the Downtown Marriott hotel on Sept. 21 The panelists: Robert Brody, president and CEO of St. Francis Hospital & Health Centers, the Indianapolis-area's fourth-largest hospital system. Brody has been chief executive at St. Francis since 1996. Dr. Robert Mouser, a primary care physician at Cornerstone Family...
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PEOs bouncing back following shakeout: Professional employer organizations enjoying growth as companies seek better ways to manage benefitsRestricted Content

October 8, 2007
Scott Olson
Even though Sentelligence Inc. in Noblesville has only five employees, the tiny tech firm offers an appealing benefits package rivaling that of a large corporation. The designer of diagnostic sensing devices for diesel engines has not discovered the Holy Grail of human resources. Rather, it's using what's known as a professional employer organization. Companies contract with PEOs to handle all the headaches of human resources, including payroll, payroll taxes, Worker's Compensation claims, health plans, and other employee benefits, not to...
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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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