Education & Workforce Development

IU ready to pick insider for president's jobRestricted Content

February 26, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Indiana University appears poised to choose an internal candidate as president for the first time in 35 years . The decision could be announced within days. Two IU trustees confirmed that finalists include Michael McRobbie and Ora Pescovitz, well-known IU administrators.
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Goodwill plotting a $10 million reuse strategy: Not-for-profit renovates HQ for expanded charter schoolRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Cory Schouten
Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana supports its job and educational programs by reselling used clothes, household items and even cars. But the virtues of reuse and recycle aren't confined to the not-for-profit's 34 local thrift stores. Goodwill has adapted its headquarters several times since it was built in 1960, to fill a variety of needs. Some of the same space within the 195,000-square-foot building has served as a retail store, an office full of cubicles, an industrial packing facility and...
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Landlords open up to 'riskier' tenants: As foreclosures increase, apartment managers let some credit issues goRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Firms that oversee large, upscale apartment complexes used to be able to set the bar high when reviewing potential tenants' credit histories. Many would turn away applicants with accounts in collections, foreclosures or outstanding medical debts. But even as more people come back to rental housing, landlords are finding they can't be as picky as in the past because more and more Indianapolis-area residents bring with them credit baggage from unpaid medical bills or home foreclosures. "Maybe 70 percent of...
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VIEWPOINT: Don't put your money into 'The Big Lie'Restricted Content

February 19, 2007
Mark Maddox
If it sounds too good to be true-invest! This perversion of the old adage has cost many investors their life savings. How does it happen? In talking to many investors who've been victimized by outright scams, I've noticed the tendency of some to respond to what we call "The Big Lie." Most investors seem to keep their guard up pretty high when approached about investing in a scheme that might return 10 percent, 15 percent or even 25 percent in...
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Not-for-profits grow as college students take hands-on approachRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Lisa Gerstner
Indianapolis not-for-profits are growing as more universities embrace service learning--an educational approach that encourages students to incorporate academics into community service.
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NOTIONS: If you want to be your best, Easy Street's a dead endRestricted Content

February 19, 2007
Bruce Hetrick
I've been driving around Indiana with my pal, the professor. For four consecutive Thursdays, we rendezvoused at dawn, grabbed cups of caffeine and headed to the northeast corner of the state to teach grant-writing. Our students, desperately seeking funds for the not-for-profit organizations they lead, were eager to learn and engaged in our lesson. The conversations en route were equally engrossing. We talked about our families and their health, our kids and their activities. We covered politics, sports and our...
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Tough road to the top: 77 percent of university presidents are men. Will new hires at IU and Purdue change that?Restricted Content

February 12, 2007
Jo Ellen
After decades of Affirmative Action, women occupy fewer than one-fourth of U.S. university presidents' offices-this despite females making up 58 percent of undergraduates, according to the U.S. Education Department. Women made decent strides between 1986, when 10 percent of college presidents' offices were occupied by women, and 2001, when 21 percent had women. However, between 2001 and 2006, the number barely changed. In the most recent survey by the Washington, D.C.-based American Council on Education, a public-policy advocacy group, preliminary...
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MICKEY MAURER Commentary: A plug for non-partisan policy makingRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
MICKEY MAURER Commentary A plug for non-partisan policy making In my final week as secretary of commerce, I appeared at a hearing before the State Budget Committee on behalf of the Indiana Economic Development Corp. The hearing was the first step in the reauthorization process for operating budget and incentive program funding for fiscal years 2008 and 2009. It was to be my final presentation at the Statehouse. In an effort to demonstrate that the Legislature was reaping a handsome...
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Technology-friendly legislation quietly advances: Bills could spur patent commercialization and moreRestricted Content

February 12, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
A handful of bills pending in the General Assembly could have a major impact on Indiana's high-tech sector. Legislation under consideration could stimulate increased commercialization of patented Indiana technology, channel more money toward development of alternative fuels, require regular review of Indiana's certified technology parks, and more. Tech leaders are optimistic about the chances their agenda will be approved. "It's the reason we married up with CICP," said Ron Brumbarger, chairman of TechPoint, a trade association for Indiana high-tech companies....
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Earmarking taxes in vogue, but is it good state policy?Restricted Content

February 12, 2007
Patrick Barkey
I was taught economics, and in particular, the subject of public finance, by a faculty dominated by old Kennedy Democrats. A lot of that teaching has rubbed off or has simply been forgotten. Much of it also could be dismissed as idealism, a sort of ivory-tower thinking not relevant to the real world. Yet as I scan and digest the various tax proposals now in front of the Indiana General Assembly, several of those old lessons keep coming to my...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Out of spotlight, state efficiency initiatives advanceRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Ed Feigenbaum
A pair of state studies last year attracted little public attention, but were highly-if warily-anticipated by business and industry, labor organizations, trade and professional groups, educators, local government officials, and even state agencies. The legislatively created Government Efficiency Commission served up its recommendation, followed, after the election, by the Office of Management and Budget's Government Efficiency and Financial Planning office Program Results: an Outcome Based Evaluation (PROBE) analysis sought by Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels. The Government Efficiency Commission offered some...
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Indiana health provider says no to drug reps: Arnett joins others wary of industry marketing powerRestricted Content

February 5, 2007
Tom Murphy
There truly is no such thing as a free lunch, or at least that's what Arnett Health-System told drug company sales representatives last fall. The Lafayette-based system banned meals for doctors that were paid for by the salespeople, but it allowed them to continue to meet with physicians through appointments. Then that stopped Jan. 1. Now, Arnett also prohibits reps from making sales calls at its roughly 20 locations in Tippecanoe County and the surrounding area. No more free samples...
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ITT leader is leaving business world behind: Chief Operating Officer Modany to step into CEO spotRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Tammy Lieber
Many CEOs take the word "retirement" figuratively, using the opportunity to become a full-time volunteer or to launch a second career. Don't count 65-year-old Rene Champagne among those people. "I'll be pursuing the leisure activities-like golf, tennis, fishing, traveling with my wife-that I don't have time to do as CEO," said the CEO and chairman of ITT Educational Services Inc., who announced Jan. 24 that he's retiring from the Carmel-based company. Although he plans to remain in Indianapolis, "I don't...
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SPORTS: Overdosing on the Colts? Enjoy it while you canRestricted Content

January 29, 2007
Bill Benner
That sport, and not religion as Karl Marx once declared, has become the "opiate of the masses" is apparent in our fair burg, where we all-or at least most of us-are overdosing on the Indianapolis Colts. The TV types are in full hyper-ventilation. The scribes are cranking out words by the thousands. No angle involving the Colts and their upcoming Super Bowl date with Da Bears in Miami will go uncovered. And, yes, some of the story lines will be...
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Lottery lease plan has fatal flaws EYE ON THE PIE:Restricted Content

January 29, 2007
Morton Marcus
Folks I talked to, Democrats and Republicans, liked the governor's State of the State speech. The fault they found was that the speech was scheduled opposite the Indiana University basketball game with Iowa. Isn't that an impeachable offense in Indiana? The part of the speech that intrigued me most was the idea about leasing the rights to the lottery to get money to establish scholarships and endowed chairs at our universities. The idea is to slow or reverse the brain...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Governor still has lots of differences with DemsRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Ed Feigenbaum
After saluting the accomplishments of the past year, Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels reached across the aisle during his State of the State Address Jan. 16 and assured Democrats that he can't make further progress without their cooperation. Once again, the governor found himself competing for the TV audience of Hoosiers at home. In what seems to be a given of sorts, the Indiana University men's basketball team was playing during the speech, taking on Hoosier hero Steve Alford's University of...
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Welder shortage looms in central Indiana, nationwideRestricted Content

January 22, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
With demand for welders outstripping supply, manufacturers, road and bridge builders, and other construction company owners are all hurting. Despite a willingness to increase hourly wages and even offer signing bonuses, the search for welders is getting more desperate.
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VIEWPOINT: Let's improve the health of working poorRestricted Content

January 15, 2007
Sue Anne
On a cold and rainy day and wearing only a thin jacket, Maria walked eight miles to get help. She was pregnant and seeking prenatal care. Her husband had deserted her. The pervasiveness of unemployed and working-poor families presents a growing challenge. Most are underinsured or have no health insurance at all. That means our charity-care system is stretched to the maximum. One north-side center that provides care for the uninsured and underinsured has seen a 15-percent increase in patients...
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Aviation school adds five degree programs: Embry-Riddle considered closing local campusRestricted Content

January 15, 2007
Chris O\'malley
One of the nation's most prominent aviation schools is giving Indianapolis another chance. After withstanding a plunge in enrollment, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is adding five degree programs at its center here, with most of them aimed at careers outside the turbulent commercial aviation sector. It also plans to expand beyond its local student base of mostly working adults to court recent high school grads. Though in Indianapolis for 13 years, Embry-Riddle has had all the profile here of a stealth...
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College targets dropouts with new program: Ivy Tech offers high school failures chance to get degree, pursue higher educationRestricted Content

January 15, 2007
Chris O\'malley
Ivy Tech Community College this month launched a pilot program that allows high school dropouts to earn their diplomas while simultaneously working toward a certificate or associate's degree in college. Intended to improve the state's labor pool, and as a lifeline to dropouts facing a dismal life in the earnings underclass, it will first be rolled out in Bloomington, Lafayette and Terre Haute. The Indianapolis campus also will offer the program aimed at those 19 or older, although a date...
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Regulator pitches first fee hike in more than a decade: The state Department of Insurance plans to hire 10Restricted Content

January 15, 2007
Tom Murphy
Indiana's thinly funded Insurance Department is pushing to raise nearly $1 million by hiking fees it charges insurers for the first time since 1994. The department also plans to shrink agent licenses from four years to two, in order to raise money and bolster continuing-education requirements. Insurance Commissioner Jim Atterholt hopes to win legislative approval this session for the measures, which would add $960,000 to the department's $5.8 million operating budget and allow it to boost its work force from...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Congress, IRS taking aim at college tax practicesRestricted Content

January 15, 2007
Marilee J.
Congress and the IRS have taken a number of significant steps recently to increase their scrutiny of colleges, universities and related organizations. What's the next step? The IRS has already tipped its hand and indicated that it intends to design and initiate unrelated business income tax-or UBIT-inquiries directed toward colleges during 2007 and 2008. This upcoming year will likely usher in a new tax climate focused upon enforcement initiatives and public transparency. The Pension Protection Act of 2006 included several...
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Business elite back alternative high school: Catholic college-prep Cristo Rey puts students to work to earn and learnRestricted Content

January 15, 2007
Chris O\'malley
Every other month, it seems, someone announces another promising alternative to the city's public schools and their low achievement levels and high dropout rates. If it isn't Indianapolis Public Schools announcing another specialty school within a high school, it's a new charter school anointed by Mayor Bart Peterson-a number now approaching 20. So one could be forgiven for being a bit cynical about these schools, as parents who can afford to continue to leave the city for better schools. But...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: Community resolutions for 2007Restricted Content

January 8, 2007
It's a week past the appropriate time to be writing about New Year's resolutions, but from the feel of traffic heading in and out of town during rush hour, it appears a number of folks are still on vacation. I think the vast majority of us are ready now to get back down to business, so I feel justified in my timing. Therefore, be it resolved: Mayor Bart Peterson and Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi should continue to address the...
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Labor sector diversification could spur local economy: $200,000 study targets finance, retail and constructionRestricted Content

January 8, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
Sexier industry sectors like life sciences or motorsports get all the press. But to remain robust, the Indianapolis Private Industry Council believes, the area economy needs diversification. The 23-year-old work-force-training not-for-profit believes the nine-county area also should target three tried-and-true industries: finance and insurance; retail, hospitality and restaurants; and construction. IPIC, whose $9 million annual budget comes from public and private grants, plans to spend $200,000 during the first quarter studying the three sectors, which collectively employ 270,000 people in...
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  1. In reality, Lilly is maintaining profit by cutting costs such as Indiana/US citizen IT workers by a significant amount with their Tata Indian consulting connection, increasing Indian H1B's at Lillys Indiana locations significantly and offshoring to India high paying Indiana jobs to cut costs and increase profit at the expense of U.S. workers.

  2. I think perhaps there is legal precedence here in that the laws were intended for family farms, not pig processing plants on a huge scale. There has to be a way to squash this judges judgment and overrule her dumb judgement. Perhaps she should be required to live in one of those neighbors houses for a month next to the farm to see how she likes it. She is there to protect the people, not the corporations.

  3. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/engineer/facts/03-111.htm Corporate farms are not farms, they are indeed factories on a huge scale. The amount of waste and unhealthy smells are environmentally unsafe. If they want to do this, they should be forced to buy a boundary around their farm at a premium price to the homeowners and landowners that have to eat, sleep, and live in a cesspool of pig smells. Imagine living in a house that smells like a restroom all the time. Does the state really believe they should take the side of these corporate farms and not protect Indiana citizens. Perhaps justifiable they should force all the management of the farms to live on the farm itself and not live probably far away from there. Would be interesting to investigate the housing locations of those working at and managing the corporate farms.

  4. downtown in the same area as O'malia's. 350 E New York. Not sure that another one could survive. I agree a Target is needed d'town. Downtown Philly even had a 3 story Kmart for its downtown residents.

  5. Indy-area residents... most of you have no idea how AMAZING Aurelio's is. South of Chicago was a cool pizza place... but it pales in comparison to the heavenly thin crust Aurelio's pizza. Their deep dish is pretty good too. My waistline is expanding just thinking about this!

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