Education & Workforce Development

Techpoint honors Indiana companies, educators: Judges narrow 80 nominees to 13 Mira winnersRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
This year's recipients of Techpoint's Mira awards include some of the area's best-known technology startups as well as lower-profile firms that have racked up big achievements. On May 18, the technology trade group was scheduled to acknowledge the accomplishments of Hoosier entrepreneurs in information technology, life sciences, advanced manufacturing and education with its eighth annual gala at the Indiana Roof Ballroom downtown. "It's always good to recognize companies and give them a pat on the back, put them on the...
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Welding school's custom curriculum gains notice: Institution counts on business-to-business contactsRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
Seeking to take advantage of a growing statewide welder shortage, the area's first school specializing in advanced welding opened this month. Photon School of Welding Inc. Director Charles Garinger and a silent partner have invested more than $300,000 to open the school at West 84th Street and Zionsville Road. The operation is financed through the founders' savings and a loan from National City Bank. It opened this month in a 6,000-squarefoot facility with a capacity of 52 welding booths. Many...
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Initiative aims at more minority participation: Construction group says current strategy not workingRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Scott Olson
More needs to be done to improve minority involvement in the construction industry than simply employing a certain percentage of the companies on projects. That's the consensus of the Indiana Construction Roundtable, an organization made up of some of the biggest users and providers of construction services. Its diversity outreach initiative aims to increase minority participation within the trades by rewarding contractors who support education and training, employ minorities and women, and mentor small minority- and women-owned businesses. The initiative...
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Group training for national dash: Not-for-profit wants to take race beyond hometownRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Chris O\'malley
A 2-1/2-year-old Indianapolis not-forprofit that funds melanoma education and research through an annual race hopes to extend its footprint around the country. Outrun the Sun Inc. has had preliminary talks with a race management firm in Los Angeles, said co-founder and Executive Director Anita Day. Los Angeles is the headquarters of Neutrogena, which recently agreed to sponsor Outrun the Sun's annual race. Momentum to take the organization national also picked up this year when it landed Shape magazine and Subaru...
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TeePee could rise again: Local man hopes to revive restaurant that was city fixture from 1930s to '70sRestricted Content

May 21, 2007
Cory Schouten
Dick Turner is looking for an entrepreneur who shares his taste for nostalgia and Big Chief cheeseburgers. For 20 years, he has dreamed of opening an updated version of the classic TeePee restaurants that served as hangouts for generations from the 1930s to 1970s. At its peak, the chain had three Indianapolis locations, each with dining rooms and curb service, on Madison Avenue and Fall Creek Boulevard and in Nora. Turner can show you the frayed legal documents that outline...
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Award-winning financial planner not ready for retirement: Cooke, sons gain notice for helping well-heeled clientsRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Scott Olson
As veteran financial planner John Cooke rehashes the highlights of his venerable career, it's evident that nothing can top the experience of working with his two sons. Close behind, though, are the accolades he's picked up along the way, including several mentions in various publications as one of the nation's top advisers. The latest recognition comes from Barron's magazine, in which Cooke is the only money manager in Indianapolis to make its list of the nation's top 100 brokers. His...
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CHRIS KATTERJOHN Commentary: A word to the generally assembledRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Like everyone else who's interested in these sorts of things, I have my opinions about the recently completed 2007 session of the Indiana General Assembly. Considering how long it took lawmakers to get on track, they accomplished some reasonably important business when it got down to the wire. Aside from the all-important balanced budget, tops on my list is the 44-cent increase in the cigarette tax. It should've been higher, but this will do for a start. For all you...
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NOTIONS: Hoosier college presidents teach a liberal arts lessonRestricted Content

May 14, 2007
Bruce Hetrick
Last Monday morning, my work took me to West Lafayette. When I learned that Purdue University would name a new president that afternoon, I decided to stick around for the festivities. Hundreds of people gathered in the Loeb Playhouse for the one-agenda-item trustees' meeting. The vote was unanimous. The introductory speech outlined an "out-of-this-world" resume. And out from behind the curtain emerged 59-year-old France Córdova: astrophysicist, university administrator, creative writer-someone Purdue board chair J. Timothy McGinley called "truly a Renaissance...
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EYE ON THE PIE: Can Big 10 show us more than sports?Restricted Content

May 14, 2007
Morton Marcus
There is an issue of greater importance than gay marriage, abortion or the tragedies of Iraq and Afghanistan. State regulation of interior designers is a matter of such public concern that the Indiana Senate supported it by a vote of 44-5 and the House, 62-34. Then, when we finally had the public protected from the inappropriate placement of sofas, the governor goes and vetoes the bill. Mitch, the spoilsport. Well, there is always next year. The governor could not stop...
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STATEHOUSE DISPATCH: Gambling quenched lawmakers' appetite for new revenueRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Ed Feigenbaum
The 2007 session of the Indiana General Assembly is now history. Whatever else might have been involved in shaping its outcome, nothing was so determinative as the revelation in the closing days that property taxes-driven by the first application of trending, rising property values in general, the elimination of the inventory tax, and some old-fashioned political legerdemain on the part of some assessors in different regions of the state-were expected to rise an average of 24 percent for taxes payable...
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Former sales rep alleges Ohio roofing firm overcharged: Tremco denies civil charges of unfair business practices in its work for Indiana school corporationsRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Peter Schnitzler
A longtime sales representative for one of the roofing industry's largest manufacturers alleges his former employer defrauded Indiana public schools out of more than $1.5 million. Brennen Baker charges that the company, Beachwood, Ohio-based Tremco Inc., circumvented Indiana's public bidding laws for school projects; overcharged for its services; and billed for materials, services and equipment it never delivered. Baker was a Tremco sales rep for southwest and central Indiana from 1991 until January 2004. Baker, who later founded the Fishers-based...
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State's big colleges don't lead way in presidential pay: Chiefs at IU, Purdue, Ball State haven't crossed half-million-dollar mark, but there are perks aplentyRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Tracy Donhardt
Competition for top college presidents is intense these days. But neither Indiana University nor Purdue University trustees appear willing to break the bank to make sure they're landing the right leader. About one in six of the public universities surveyed by the Chronicle of Higher Education now pays its president more than $500,000. That's well above the $400,000 IU's new leader, Michael McRobbie, will collect-though his wife, Laurie Burns McRobbie, will receive another $90,000 for her efforts to support and...
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Informatics job 'special' to dean: New leader of prominent IU school says no other offer could have lured him away from ColoradoRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Scott Olson
Even before Bobby Schnabel became a candidate to take charge at the Indiana University School of Informatics, he knew enough about the program to know he wanted to lead it. By ending his 30-year affiliation with the University of Colorado at Boulder, Schnabel, 56, officially exchanges the black and gold of the Buffaloes for the cream and crimson of the Hoosiers on July 1. But of even greater significance is the fact that IU sought Schnabel to succeed J. Michael...
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Entrepreneur sees niche for for-profit law schoolRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Chris O'Malley
But Mark Montefiori wants to create a law school to train perhaps hundreds more lawyers each year. He plans to share with potential investors his vision for The Abraham Clark School of Law, named after one of the lesser-known signers of the Declaration of Independence, May 10 at the Indianapolis Marriott North.
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Flood of traffic latest twist in RiverPlace battle: Indianapolis planners find traffic impact study for Fishers project leakyRestricted Content

May 7, 2007
Chris O\'malley
Environmentalists who lost a court battle to stop RiverPlace on grounds it will cause flooding upstream along the White River have been buoyed by concerns raised by Indianapolis officials that the 69-acre development could create a torrent of traffic trouble. Last month, in a letter sent to Fishers' public works director, the Department of Metropolitan Development cited numerous shortcomings with a traffic impact study commissioned by RiverPlace developer Centre Properties. Indianapolis-based Centre has asked Fishers to rezone the property, just...
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Minimum wage set to increase: Small-business owners bracing themselves for changeRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
Jeff Coppinger just can't support legislative efforts to raise the minimum wage. Part-time employees at his Lazy Daze Coffee House in Irvington start at $6 an hour and top out at about $8-well over the $5.15 hourly minimum. But he knows that won't be good enough if a pending federal rate change passes. "In the past, I've always been a champion for raising the minimum wage," said Coppinger, who opened his business in 2003. "But now that I'm in business,...
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Conner Prairie testing ideas for new exhibits: Officials consider virtual canoe ride, hearthside dinners in effort to keep museum's attendance on upswingRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Jennifer Whitson
The possibilities are intriguing: A tethered hot-air balloon ride. Old-time hearthside dinners prepared with farm-fresh ingredients. A wilderness-skill challenge that includes rock climbing and a virtual canoe ride. Leaders at Conner Prairie are weighing which-if any-of those ideas would be a good fit at the Hamilton County living history museum, which is focusing on its future even as it works to preserve the past. "The board is very committed to the idea that Conner Prairie must remain relevant and exciting...
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Embarking on a new Venture: New leader planning progressive changes at center, not a total revampingRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Scott Olson
The new leader of the Indiana Venture Center is beginning to put his stamp on the not-for-profit that mentors promising startups. James Eifert, 64, is the former president of Terre Haute-based Rose-Hulman Ventures who took charge of the center in December following the July resignation of Steve Beck. Beck left to become co-managing director of IVC Equity Partners, a new local seed-capital fund. Chief items on Eifert's to-do list are broadening the donor base, revamping the Venture Center's proprietary network...
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SPORTS: The Attucks story finally finds a national audienceRestricted Content

April 30, 2007
Bill Benner
Inspiration is timeless. In that regard, it doesn't matter that two years after its initial release and 52 years after the fact, the story of the Crispus Attucks Tigers and their amazing coach, Ray Crowe, is finally being shared with the nation. On April 27, "Something To Cheer About," the documentary that chronicles the triumphs and travails of the Attucks teams of the 1950s, opened in nine markets: New York; Los Angeles; Chicago; Detroit; Washington, D.C.; Atlanta; Minneapolis; Dallas; and,...
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MICKEY MAURER Commentary: An Indianapolis gem shines againRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
It's no secret that my mentor is Gene B. Glick. I was privileged to work for Gene early in my career and learn the right way to be a success in business. For example, the ability to remain calm while reacting to the many calamities and adversities of a typical business life is one of the attributes of the Glick style that I admire most. I could have used more time at the feet of this master, but, luckily, school...
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Ivy Tech: new community college with long history:Restricted Content

April 23, 2007
-Chris O\'malley
Indiana was on the verge of creating a statewide community college system 40 years ago, but Hoosier politics and university turf wars got in the way-stomping a seed that in recent years has flourished in other states as a sort of economic tree of life. Community colleges increasingly are called on to train new workers and retrain existing ones for a high-tech economy. But the thinking back in the 1960s, said then-freshman legislator John Mutz, was that a community college...
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Wright Development LLC: Providing the missing piece Development company aims to recreate neighborhoodsRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Marc D.
Driving around the Holy Cross area just east of Lockerbie, the CEO of Wright Development LLC points out several properties her company has bought and refurbished-starting with 1209 and 1210 E. Vermont St.-as well as the many rehabs in the works. "Our goal is to re-create neighborhoods and make them viable, thriving, desirable places to live," she said. "That's usually left to the city, the not-for-profits and the [community development corporations]. We feel like there's been a component missing." The...
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DOING GOOD: LINDSAY CORNELIUS: MBA student emerging as philanthropic leaderRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Judith Cebula
DOING GOOD LINDSAY CORNELIUS MBA student emerging as philanthropic leader To hear Lindsay Cornelius tell it, Indianapolis is the best place to live: It's a growing city, with terrific new restaurants, fabulous art galleries, great parks, excellent museums, hip clubs and a booming downtown. But like any major metropoli tan area, it has its problems. And that has Cornelius, 26, determined to be among the legions of young men and women who care deeply about things like quality schools and...
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Ivy Tech boasts healthy enrollment, but most students wither on vineRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Chris O'Malley
Ivy Tech Community College--charged with cranking out workers to fill high-demand jobs in critical occupations--has an output rate reminiscent of an old, state-owned Soviet assembly line. Incoming President Thomas Snyder is taking over a community college system that graduates only 12 percent of its students within three years.
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IU alum selling rare Neiman collectionRestricted Content

April 23, 2007
Anthony Schoettle
Indianapolis businessman Barton Kaufman is auctioning off 26 paintings by notable New York artist LeRoy Neiman. Kaufman plans to donate the money to Indiana University, where he earned an undergraduate degree in 1962 and law degree in 1965.
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  1. I never thought I'd see the day when a Republican Mayor would lead the charge in attempting to raise every tax we have to pay. Now it's income taxes and property taxes that Ballard wants to increase. And to pay for a pre-K program? Many studies have shown that pre-K offer no long-term educational benefits whatsoever. And Ballard is pitching it as a way of fighting crime? Who is he kidding? It's about government provided day care. It's a shame that we elected a Republican who has turned out to be a huge big spending, big taxing, big borrowing liberal Democrat.

  2. Why do we blame the unions? They did not create the 11 different school districts that are the root of the problem.

  3. I was just watching an AOW race from cleveland in 1997...in addition to the 65K for the race, there were more people in boats watching that race from the lake than were IndyCar fans watching the 2014 IndyCar season finale in the Fontana grandstands. Just sayin...That's some resurgence modern IndyCar has going. Almost profitable, nobody in the grandstands and TV ratings dropping 61% at some tracks in the series. Business model..."CRAZY" as said by a NASCAR track general manager. Yup, this thing is purring like a cat! Sponsors...send them your cash, pronto!!! LOL, not a chance.

  4. I'm sure Indiana is paradise for the wealthy and affluent, but what about the rest of us? Over the last 40 years, conservatives and the business elite have run this country (and state)into the ground. The pendulum will swing back as more moderate voters get tired of Reaganomics and regressive social policies. Add to that the wave of minority voters coming up in the next 10 to 15 years and things will get better. unfortunately we have to suffer through 10 more years of gerrymandered districts and dispropionate representation.

  5. Funny thing....rich people telling poor people how bad the other rich people are wanting to cut benefits/school etc and that they should vote for those rich people that just did it. Just saying..............

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