Education & Workforce Development

NOTIONS: A suburban pay-me-now-or-pay-me-later storyRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Longer ago than I'd like to admit, my parents were expecting their first child (me). And they wanted their little guy to grow up in a nice, safe neighborhood. Mom and Dad weren't earning much. But they borrowed a down payment from Grandpa, took out a whopping $80-per-month mortgage, and purchased a tiny, newly constructed house on the outskirts of Lafayette. My parents had grown up in the established parts of Lafayette. They knew well the old homes, old streets...
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IUPUI's tourism department luring hundreds of students: City's convention industry, program's focus on meeting planning make department fastest growing on campusRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
After Kelly Sernau earned an associate in arts degree in hospitality at Michigan State University, she began researching schools that offered a bachelor's degree in the field. She considered staying in her home state, then researched schools in Chicago and other places. Ultimately, she opted to transfer to IUPUI's Department of Tourism, Conventions and Event Management within the School of Physical Education and Tourism Management. "I wanted to focus on meeting planning, [but] most programs focus on the hotel aspect...
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Moving lessons from classrooms to boardrooms: MBA students get firsthand experience with startupsRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Victoria D.
No matter how many bold and italicized words scholars cram into textbooks, nothing compares to students rolling up their sleeves and testing a theory themselves. For years, Indiana University's Kelley School of Business has offered its Bloomington MBA candidates real-world experience through so-called "academies" focused on specific industries. Now Kelley Indianapolis' evening MBA program is set to launch a scaled-back version for its students. This fall, it will offer three such "enterprise" programs, including one with an entrepreneurial emphasis. The...
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VIEWPOINT: Indiana ripe for new breed of auto industryRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
Robert A.
Landing the Honda plant is a great coup for Indiana. Gov. Mitch Daniels deserves congratulations. Not only will Honda employ an estimated 2,000 Hoosiers, it appears the governor secured the facility at a bargain price for Indiana's taxpayers. While the plant brings much-needed employment, future wealth created from Honda's production accrues to its primarily Japanese shareholders. This is only fair, as Japanese automakers have innovated, invested and expanded over the past 30 years. They have earned their success and deserve...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: In defense of daydreamingRestricted Content

July 31, 2006
In addition to standbys like Little League and Girl Scouts, our children have the opportunity to learn sailing at Geist Reservoir, strut their stuff at the Jewish Community Center's Broadway camp, or try medieval fantasy drawing at the Indianapolis Art Center. With such an appetizing array of choices, it's hard to resist serving our kids a heaping plateful. Most of us want to give our children advantages we were not afforded, and "Mixed Media for Preschoolers" certainly qualifies. Besides, who...
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Indiana encourages agri-tourism efforts:Restricted Content

July 31, 2006
Scott Olson
For Cliff Carley, Sept. 11, 2001, is a date of great personal significance unrelated to tragic events. That's the day the construction company owner bought a pair of Rocky Mountain elk and began raising the large deer on his northern Hamilton County property near Atlanta. Nearly five years later, Carley Elk Farm hosts Saturday tours for which visitors pay $5 to roam the rural acreage and help feed a herd that numbers about 50. On the way home, they can...
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State awarenesss initiative targeting investment fraud: Program touts knowledge to prevent financial scamsRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Tracy Donhardt
Conservative estimates put the amount of money Hoosiers are bilked by investment fraud scammers at $100 million a year. The high-end estimate for victims of pyramid scams, bogus gas and oil ventures and unscrupulous mortgage practices is closer to $800 million. Those involved in catching and prosecuting the scammers say proactively educating people about investments in general and scams in particular would go a long way toward helping the problem. "Our financial illiteracy is high," said Mark Maddox, managing partner...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Education does matter in today's labor marketRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Here's an update from the American labor market: Paying attention in school really does matter. Getting good grades and going to college is a big deal. What you study and what you learn will affect the rest of your life. Parents have been telling their kids that for a long time, and some of us even listened. But the message above isn't from a speech or a lecture. It comes from evidence provided by the U.S. economy, in particular the...
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VOICES FROM THE INDUSTRY: Consumers rarely raise banks above commodity statusRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Jeffrey A.
Toothpaste. Laundry bleach. Cat food. Banking services. Despite the hopes of many bank executives, vast numbers of consumers rarely elevate their banks beyond everyday commodity status. Through traditional advertising and marketing, many banks attempt to differenti ate themselves as the bank of choice or the bank that makes a difference. Repeat the tag line often enough and hopefully potential customers will start to believe it. One fact underscores this unfortunate commodity service status: According to recent market research, the No....
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Hispanic radio stations are singing new song: New general manager making major changesRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Anthony Schoettle
Russ Dodge is used to scaling cultural barriers. For 17 years, Dodge, who is white, was a sales manager at WTLC, one of Indianapolis' top radio stations targeting blacks. Dodge was central in numerous community outreach efforts at WTLC. As the new general manager of two Indianapolis Hispanic radio stations, Dodge is attempting to hurdle not only another cultural divide, but a language barrier to boot. Dodge, 54, took the helm of WEDJFM 107.1 and WSYW-AM 810 in April, and...
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New fiscal year, no cuts for IU School of Medicine: But concern remains about funds for future growthRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Tom Murphy
No layoffs. No seven-figure budget cut to sweat through. IU School of Medicine Dean Dr. Craig Brater had many reasons to raise a toast this month, when a new fiscal year began and the school left behind an old one marked by the worst budget cuts in decades. Indeed, Brater said he is breathing a little easier as the school starts fiscal 2006-2007 with a budget of more than $815 million. An increase in clinical revenue and grant money helped...
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Ivy Tech to offer mortuary science degreeRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Chris O'Malley
Ivy Tech Community College will train students in mortuary sciences, filling a void left when Indiana College of Mortuary Science kicked the bucket several years ago.
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Ball State downtown outpost to offer classes, master's degreesRestricted Content

July 24, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
Ball State University is preparing to stake a big claim in downtown Indianapolis, where it will offer classes and graduate degree programs at a new satellite facility.
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: Will telecom reform bring cell service to remote areas?Restricted Content

July 17, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Those of us who spend a lot of time in airports get an effective education in the economics of competition by observing-and paying-the fares charged by airlines. It's really quite simple. Fly a route served by several airlines, especially if one of them is a low-cost, no-frills carrier such as Southwest, and fares will be reasonably low. But if you are unlucky enough to fly to or from a smaller city, or even a large one where a single carrier...
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Animated startup foresees big growth in life sciences: Company produces 3-D graphics with young talentRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Scott Olson
Harlon Wilson and Kurtis Rush originally intended their Indianapolis-based upstart business to provide 3-D animation for use in court cases. But if they had stuck to that business plan, Medical Animatics Inc. could not have produced the video to the hilarious "Urine Stream," a song parody of Abba's "Dancing Queen." Here's a sample of the chorus: So when you get the chance, undo your pants ... And make a urine stream, gold and clean, oh it's such a dream. Urine...
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NOTIONS: Hailing the hare in the land of the tepid tortoiseRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
I was going to play smart aleck this week. I was going to write in hick dialect. I was going to lambaste us Hoosiers over our stubborn adherence to the status quo, our penchant to take things slow, our preference for partisanship, our pooh-poohing of progress and our bull-headed gumption to go it alone in a global economy. Then news broke that Indiana has the highest high school dropout rate in America. So I figured that for two reasons, I'd...
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Knowledge is Power: Women need to be active participants in planning for a secure financial futureRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Shari Finnell
Women need to be active participants in planning for a secure financial future When Elaine E. Bedel started her practice as a certified financial planner nearly 30 years ago, she and her colleagues spent most of their time educating clients on the basics of developing an overall strategy for their financial future. Up until then, the typical retirement revolved around employer pensions and maybe a few outside investments. And most clients were men. It was typical for the husband to handle...
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ECONOMIC ANALYSIS: State's 'circuit breaker' law worsens flawed tax systemRestricted Content

July 10, 2006
Patrick Barkey
Fifty years ago, economist Charles Tiebout expressed a vision of how freeing local governments to pursue their own unique strategies for setting taxes and providing services could produce an efficient outcome much like the private marketplace. He called it "voting with your feet." The idea was simple-by moving, people could sort themselves out and live in communities that came closest to providing the tax and expenditure combinations they valued most. Reality is quite a bit more complicated. When people move...
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Black Expo CEO seeks 'next level': Rogers hopes to build on Williams' legacy The Summer Celebration schedule appears in our Diversity in Business Focus. PAGES 15A-19ARestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Tammy A.
The Summer Celebration schedule appears in our Diversity in Business Focus. PAGES 15A-19A The title of Indiana Black Expo Inc.'s 2005 annual report couldn't be more fitting: "Con tinuing the Legacy." It's an apt description for both the organization's recent history and its goals for the future. As Black Expo prepares to kick off its second Summer Celebration without its longtime leader, Rev. Charles Williams, CEO Joyce Q. Rogers is abuzz with ideas to make the nation's largest black heritage...
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TAWN PARENT Commentary: Take 2 aspirin and a few months offRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Maybe what you need is a sabbatical. The term comes from ancient Judea, where it described the year of rest given to land every seventh year to keep it from becoming depleted. Today, "sabbatical" conjures up images of ivory towers and a practice out of step with the breakneck pace of modern business. A perk that seems at best a luxury and at worst a waste of time and money for the employer. Tell that to Intel, Xerox Corp. and...
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Patient safety center steers clear of the blame game: New approach modeled after aviation industryRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Tom Murphy
Indiana hospitals are drawing inspiration from the aviation industry for their latest push to reduce medical errors. The Indiana Patient Safety Center, which opened July 1, will foster a blamefree approach to reporting errors, much like the environment promoted by the Federal Aviation Administration. The result will be a culture that encourages system analysis to fix flaws that lead to an error, rather than one that merely heaps blame on the person who committed it, said Bob Morr, vice president...
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Leader tapped to make the IMA a 'must see': New director to focus on art and nature parkRestricted Content

July 3, 2006
Jennifer Whitson
The Indianapolis Museum of Art's new director isn't afraid to ruffle feathers. During his five years as director of the Whitney Museum of American Art, he reportedly butted heads with the board over programming and oversaw a staff reorganization that triggered the departure of several curators. He also resigned after the board rejected a $200 million expansion he pushed. But Maxwell Anderson, who started at the IMA June 19, dismisses that reputation. "The Whitney is a very unusual place," said...
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Artist out to protect her images: Noel sues Texas distributor for copyright infringementRestricted Content

June 26, 2006
Victoria D.
Zionsville artist Nancy Noel's original work can be seen in the homes of Mikhail Gorbachev, Robert Redford, Denzel Washington and Oprah Winfrey. Noel prides herself on its originality and authenticity. And she said she'll "go after anyone" who threatens that. This spring, Noel filed a federal lawsuit against Texas-based art distributor Martha Ewell, alleging she made unauthorized copies of Noel's images-including her popular Amish and angel collections-and sold them on the Internet. She is asking to be paid $30,000 for...
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NOTIONS: Gore's film has lessons we should heedRestricted Content

June 26, 2006
Bruce Hetrick
Last Friday night, my friend Cheri and I decided to go out to dinner and a movie. The film we chose wasn't playing near our downtown home. So we had to get in the car and drive 14 miles northwest to Traders Point. As we sat outside at Abuelo's eating and talking, we watched hundreds of cars, trucks and SUVs pass by on 86th Street. This led to a conversation about the environment and the need for mass transit in...
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Scrapping it: Flurry of area shops close the books on once-hot business

June 26, 2006
Matthew Kish
Forget-Me-Not in Greenwood will soon be forgotten. The store, which sold scrapbook albums and supplies, closed last month. It was the latest of at least seven scrapbook stores to close in the past few months in central Indiana. Business analysts are calling the rash of out-of-business signs a cautionary tale for proprietors who invest in "silo businesses" that base their bottom line on a trend or product that may soon be out of style. "A lot of the mom-and-pop [scrapbook]...
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  1. By Mr. Lee's own admission, he basically ran pro-bono ads on the billboard. Paying advertisers didn't want ads on a controversial, ugly billboard that turned off customers. At least one of Mr. Lee's free advertisers dropped out early because they found that Mr. Lee's advertising was having negative impact. So Mr. Lee is disingenous to say the city now owes him for lost revenue. Mr. Lee quickly realized his monstrosity had a dim future and is trying to get the city to bail him out. And that's why the billboard came down so quickly.

  2. Merchants Square is back. The small strip center to the south of 116th is 100% leased, McAlister’s is doing well in the outlot building. The former O’Charleys is leased but is going through permitting with the State and the town of Carmel. Mac Grill is closing all of their Indy locations (not just Merchants) and this will allow for a new restaurant concept to backfill both of their locations. As for the north side of 116th a new dinner movie theater and brewery is under construction to fill most of the vacancy left by Hobby Lobby and Old Navy.

  3. Yes it does have an ethics commission which enforce the law which prohibits 12 specific items. google it

  4. Thanks for reading and replying. If you want to see the differentiation for research, speaking and consulting, check out the spreadsheet I linked to at the bottom of the post; it is broken out exactly that way. I can only include so much detail in a blog post before it becomes something other than a blog post.

  5. 1. There is no allegation of corruption, Marty, to imply otherwise if false. 2. Is the "State Rule" a law? I suspect not. 3. Is Mr. Woodruff obligated via an employment agreement (contractual obligation) to not work with the engineering firm? 4. In many states a right to earn a living will trump non-competes and other contractual obligations, does Mr. Woodruff's personal right to earn a living trump any contractual obligations that might or might not be out there. 5. Lawyers in state government routinely go work for law firms they were formally working with in their regulatory actions. You can see a steady stream to firms like B&D from state government. It would be interesting for IBJ to do a review of current lawyers and find out how their past decisions affected the law firms clients. Since there is a buffer between regulated company and the regulator working for a law firm technically is not in violation of ethics but you have to wonder if decisions were made in favor of certain firms and quid pro quo jobs resulted. Start with the DOI in this review. Very interesting.

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